Sayuri Katano

Kyoto Women's University, Kioto, Kyōto, Japan

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Publications (5)7.72 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Prevalence of men with cardiometabolic risk factors (CMRF) is increasing in Japan. Few studies have comprehensively examined the relation between lifestyles and CMRF. We examined the baseline data from 3,498 male workers ages 19 to 69 years who participated in the high-risk and population strategy for occupational health promotion (HIPOP-OHP) study at 12 large-scale companies throughout Japan. The physical activity of each participant was classified according to the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Dietary intake was surveyed by a semi-quantitative Food Frequency Questionnaire. We defined four CMRF in this study as follows: 1) high blood pressure (BP): systolic BP ≥ 130 mmHg, or diastolic BP ≥ 85 mmHg, or the use of antihypertensive drugs; 2) dyslipidemia: high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentration < 40 mg/dl, or triglycerides concentration ≥ 150 mg/dl, or on medication for dyslipidemia; 3) impaired glucose tolerance: fasting blood sugar concentration ≥110 mg/dl; 4) obese: a body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m2. Those who had 0 to 4 CMRF accounted for 1,597 (45.7%), 1,032 (29.5%), 587 (16.8%), 236 (6.7%), and 44 (1.3%) participants, respectively, in the Poisson distribution. Poisson regression analysis revealed that independent factors that contributed to the number of CMRF were age (b = 0.020, P < 0.01), IPAQ (b = -0.091, P < 0.01), alcohol intake (ml/day) (b = 0.001, P = 0.03), percentage of protein intake (b = 0.059, P = 0.01), and total energy intake (kcal)(b = 0.0001, P < 0.01). Furthermore, alcohol intake and its frequency had differential effects. Alcohol intake, percent protein and total energy intake were positively associated, whereas drinking frequency and IPAQ were inversely associated, with the number of CMRF.
    Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome 11/2011; 3:30. · 1.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the association of the number of metabolic syndrome diagnostic components (MetS-DC) with health-related quality of life (HR-QOL). We examined the baseline data from 4,480 healthy workers in Japan (3,668 men and 812 women) aged 19-69 years. We assessed HR-QOL based on scores for five scales of the SF-36. We defined four components for MetS in this study as follows: (1) high blood pressure (BP); (2) dyslipidemia; (3) impaired glucose tolerance; and (4) overweight: a body mass index ≥25 kg/m(2). Logistic regression analysis adjusted for lifestyle factors was used to examine the association of the number of MetS-DC with the HR-QOL sub-scales. Those who had 0-4 MetS-DC accounted for 2,287, 1,135, 722, 282, and 54 participants. The number of MetS-DC inversely contributed significantly to General Health (norm-based scoring >50) (odd ratios [OR] 0.59-0.82, P < 0.05) and positively associated with Mental Health (OR 1.37, P < 0.05). When adjusted for lifestyle factors, the number of MetS-DC was inversely associated with General Health and positively with Mental Health in men and women.
    Quality of Life Research 10/2011; 21(7):1165-70. · 2.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Aims/Introduction: To examine the cross-sectional relationship between sleep duration and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), including diabetes mellitus (DM), we analyzed a large-scale healthy workers database in Japan.Materials and Methods: We examined the baseline database of 4143 participants (3415 men and 728 women) aged 19–69 years. Sleep duration of participants was categorized into four groups:
    Journal of Diabetes Investigation. 10/2011; 2(5).
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the relation between sleep duration and metabolic syndrome (MetS). We examined the baseline data from 4356 healthy workers (3556 men and 800 women) aged 19-69 years. The physical activity of each participant was classified according to the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). We defined four components of MetS diagnostic components in this study as follows: 1) high blood pressure (BP) systolic BP [SBP] ≥ 130 mmHg, or diastolic BP [DBP] ≥ 85 mmHg, or on medication; 2) dyslipidemia (high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentration <40 mg/dL, or triglycerides concentration ≥150 mg/dL, or on medication; 3) impaired glucose tolerance (fasting blood sugar concentration ≥ 110 mg/dL, or if less than 8 hours after meals ≥ 140 mg/dL), or on medication; and 4) overweight (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 25 kg/m(2)), or obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)). There were 680 participants in the group, with sleep duration <6 hours (15.6%). Those who had 0-4 MetS diagnostic components, including overweight, accounted for 2159, 1222, 674, 255, and 46 participants, respectively, in the Poisson distribution. Poisson regression analysis revealed that independent factors that contributed to the number of MetS diagnostic components were being male (regression coefficient b = 0.752, P < 0.001), age (b = 0.026, P < 0.001), IPAQ classification (b = -0.238, P = 0.034), and alcohol intake (mL/day) (b = 0.018, P < 0.001). Short sleep duration (<6 hours) was also related to the number of MetS (b = 0.162, P < 0.001). The results of analyses with obesity component showed a similar association. Short sleep duration was positively associated with the number of MetS diagnostic components independent of other lifestyle habits.
    Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy 01/2011; 4:119-25.
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the relation between lifestyle and the number of metabolic syndrome (MetS) diagnostic components in a general population, and to find a means of preventing the development of MetS components. We examined baseline data from 3,365 participants (2,714 men and 651 women) aged 19 to 69 years who underwent a physical examination, lifestyle survey, and blood chemical examination. The physical activity of each participant was classified according to the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). We defined four components for MetS in this study as follows: 1) high BP: systolic BP > or = 130 mmHg or diastolic BP > or = 85 mmHg, or the use of antihypertensive drugs; 2) dyslipidemia: high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentration < 40 mg/dL, triglycerides concentration > or = 150 mg/dL, or on medication for dyslipidemia; 3) Impaired glucose tolerance: fasting blood sugar level > or = 110 mg/d, or if less than 8 hours after meals > or = 140 mg/dL), or on medication for diabetes mellitus; 4) obesity: body mass index > or = 25 kg/m(2). Those who had 0 to 4 MetS diagnostic components accounted for 1,726, 949, 484, 190, and 16 participants, respectively, in the Poisson distribution. Poisson regression analysis revealed that independent factors contributing to the number of MetS diagnostic components were being male (regression coefficient b=0.600, p < 0.01), age (b=0.027, p < 0.01), IPAQ class (b=-0.272, p= 0.03), and alcohol consumption (b=0.020, p=0.01). The contribution of current smoking was not statistically significant (b=-0.067, p=0.76). Moderate physical activity was inversely associated with the number of MetS diagnostic components, whereas smoking was not associated.
    Journal of atherosclerosis and thrombosis 04/2010; 17(6):644-50. · 2.93 Impact Factor