Peijin Hu

Peking University Health Science Center, Peping, Beijing, China

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Publications (4)10.87 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To identify gender differences among Chinese school-aged children from 1995 to 2010, and to project the future BMI-for-age z-score distribution and prevalence of obesity. Design and methods: The data were from four cross-sectional surveys (1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010) of Chinese National Surveys on Students Constitution and Health (CNSSCH) with a national representative sample of Chinese children, involving more than 200,000 participants at each survey. BMI-for-age Z-score distributional shifts overall and in percentiles were compared by gender. Average shift was calculated for 4 survey periods and used for projecting future distributions and obesity prevalence. Results: BMI-for-age Z-score increased more in their upper percentile distribution, indicating that Chinese children have become heavier over the past 15 years. Gender disparity in BMI-for-age Z-score has become wider during the period. Over a 15-year period, BMI-for-age Z-score shift among girls has been stable, while boy's BMI-for-age Z-score shifts has increased linearly. By 2020, the obesity prevalence is predicted to be 10.18% and 4.99% for boys and girls, respectively. Conclusions: The wider gender disparity suggested a larger proportion of obesity in boys than in girls. Therefore, gender-specific preventive guidelines and public health policies for childhood obesity and cardiovascular diseases are urgently needed in China.
    Obesity 12/2013; · 3.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Children in China are experiencing a rapid increase in the prevalence of obesity, which is associated with hypertension. To compare the effect of body fat on blood pressure (BP) with that of the normal physical growth, we compared BP levels in Chinese children with different body fat levels. In the present population-based study, 13 972 children in the highest-skinfold-thickness-quartile group were individually matched to 13 972 children in the lowest-skinfold-thickness-quartile group by height and weight. Similarly, 5103 children in the highest-waist-circumference-quartile group were matched to the same number of children in the lowest-waist-circumference-quartile group. The high- and low-fat groups had similar height and weight but the high-fat group had significantly higher skinfold and waist circumference measurements. The differences in systolic BP (SBP) between the high- and low-skinfold-thickness groups were small: 0·01 (95 % CI - 0·41, 0·44) mmHg in boys and 0·20 (95 % CI - 0·15, 0·54) mmHg in girls. The differences in diastolic BP (DBP) were also small (0·39 and 0·38 mmHg for boys and girls, respectively) but were statistically significant. The differences in both SBP and DBP between the high- and low-waist-circumference groups were small but not statistically significant. For a given body size as measured by height and weight, relative body fat had little impact on BP levels in these children. Fat mass and lean mass may have a similar quantitative impact on BP in healthy-weight children.
    The British journal of nutrition 01/2012; · 3.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to quantify the relationships of height, weight and body mass index (BMI) with blood pressure (BP) levels in Chinese children and adolescents. Height, weight, BMI and BP measurements were obtained from a nationally representative sample of 231,227 children aged 7-18 years. Body size measurements were converted to age- and sex-specific standard deviation (SD) scores. The relationships between body size and BP measurements were assessed using linear regression analysis. All body size measurements were significantly associated with BP levels. Systolic BP increased 4.14, 3.70 and 2.88 mmHg in boys and 2.98, 2.63 and 1.87 mmHg in girls, corresponding to 1 SD increase in weight, BMI and height, respectively. A similar pattern was also observed for diastolic BP. After adjustment for height, systolic BP increased substantially with increasing weight (3.96 mmHg/SD increase for boys and 2.92 mmHg for girls). With adjustment for weight, systolic BP increased slightly with 1 SD increase in height (0.27 mmHg for boys and 0.10 mmHg for girls). The strength of the association between a body size measurement and BP varied among different ages, peaked at 10-11 years in girls and around 12-14 years in boys. Weight is the most powerful driving force of BP in children and adolescents, followed by BMI and height. Height has little impact on BP in children with a given weight, while weight has considerable impact on BP in children with a given height.
    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health 11/2011; 48(5):413-8. · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To establish BMI percentile curves that describe the contemporary BMI distribution among Chinese children, and to compare their BMI percentile curves with those in two recently developed international references: the WHO and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (US CDC) growth references. A cross-sectional national survey. Thirty provinces, municipalities and autonomous regions in China. Nationally representative sample of 232 140 school students aged 7-18 years. BMI percentile curves were established using the LMS method, and were compared with the percentiles of the WHO and the US CDC references. BMI distributions and growth patterns in Chinese children were dramatically different from those in the two international reference populations. Compared with the international reference populations, younger Chinese boys (7-12 years of age) had higher values of the percentiles above the median and lower values of the percentiles below the median, suggesting that they had larger proportions of extreme BMI values in both directions. Chinese girls and older Chinese boys (15-18 years of age) had substantially lower BMI percentiles than their counterparts in the reference populations, particularly those high percentiles among older age groups. The present study described the unique patterns of BMI curves at the national level, and these curves are useful as a reference for comparing different regions and for monitoring changes over time in Chinese children. Higher proportions of children with extreme values in both directions indicate that China is currently facing both an increasing level of obesity and a high level of undernutrition, simultaneously.
    Public Health Nutrition 04/2010; 13(12):1990-6. · 2.25 Impact Factor