N. Chritin

CERN, Genève, Geneva, Switzerland

Are you N. Chritin?

Claim your profile

Publications (7)3.85 Total impact

  • Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A Accelerators Spectrometers Detectors and Associated Equipment 11/2013; · 1.14 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a study for a future linear electron-positron collider based on a two-beam acceleration scheme in which a high-intensity drive beam is decelerated in order to provide the power to accelerate the main beam for collision in the TeV range. The power extracted from the drive beam deteriorates the beam quality and increases the energy spread significantly. Monitoring of the beam properties is therefore challenging but essential. These challenges are being addressed experimentally at the CLIC test facility where up to 55% of the power is extracted from the beam in the test beam line, a small-scale version of the CLIC drive-beam decelerator, leaving the beam with a very wide energy profile. For monitoring of the transverse beam profile and Twiss parameters we use optical transition radiation screens and quadrupole scans. The intra-pulse-train energy spectrum before and after deceleration is measured with segmented beam dumps. In this paper we discuss the performance of these diagnostic devices with a particular emphasis on the large energy spread and its effect on the beam imaging techniques, and with a final outlook to the CLIC drive-beam diagnostics.
    Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams 08/2013; 16:082802. · 1.57 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The power source of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) relies on the generation and deceleration of a high-intensity electron drive beam. In order to provide the best radio-frequency (RF) to beam-energy transfer efficiency, the electron beam is accelerated using fully loaded RF cavities, which leads to strong beam loading effects resulting in a high-energy transient. The stability of the RF power produced by the drive beam depends on the stability of the drive beam energy and energy spread along the pulse. The control and the monitoring of the time evolution of the beam energy distribution are therefore crucial for the accelerator performance. For this purpose segmented beam dumps, which are simple and robust devices, have been designed and installed at the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3). These devices are located at the end of spectrometer lines and provide horizontal beam profiles with a time resolution better than 10 ns. The segmented dumps are composed of parallel, vertical, metallic plates, and are based on the same principle as a Faraday cup: the impinging beam current is read by a fast acquisition channel. Both FLUKA and Geant4 simulations were performed to define the optimum detector geometry for beam energies ranging from 5 MeV to 150 MeV. This paper presents a detailed description of the different steps of the design: the optimization of the detector spatial resolution, the minimization of the thermal load and the long-term damage resulting from high radiation doses. Four segmented dumps are currently used in the CTF3 complex. Their measured performance and limitations are presented in this paper. Typical beam spectra as measured in the CTF3 linac are also presented along with a description of the RF manipulations needed for tuning the beam energy spectrum.
    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A Accelerators Spectrometers Detectors and Associated Equipment 08/2012; · 1.14 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The CLIC study is based on the so-called two-beam acceleration concept and one of the main goals of the CLIC Test Facility 3 is to demonstrate the efficiency of the CLIC RF power production scheme. As part of this facility a Test Beam Line (TBL), presently under commissioning, is a small-scale version of a CLIC decelerator. To perform as expected the beam line must show efficient and stable RF power production over 16 consecutive decelerating structures. As the high intensity electron beam is decelerated its energy spread grows by up to 60 %. A novel segmented beam dump for time resolved energy measurements has been designed to match the requirements of the TBL. As a complement, a diffusive OTR screen is also installed in the same spectrometer line. The combination of these two devices will provide both a high spatial resolution measurement of both the energy and energy spread and a measurement with a few nanoseconds time response. This paper describes the design of the new segmented dump and presents the results from the first commissioning of the TBL spectrometer line.
    01/2010;
  • The European Particle Accelerator Conference, Genoa, Italy; 01/2008
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The CERN CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) aims at assessing the feasibility of the future multi-TeV Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The CTF3 Tail Clipper Collimator (TCC) will serve to adjust the bunch train length of the beam extracted from the combiner ring, in combination with a fast kicker magnet. In addition, the TCC will operate, when required, as an internal beam dump. The challenge of the TCC design is to meet the requirements of both collimation and dump operational modes for a low energy e -beam (100-300MeV) of 35A peak intensity. The TCC collimator will be installed in January 2009 in the TL2 transfer line of CTF3. This paper describes the final design of the TCC and the main issues related to its integration in the line.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The high charge (>6μC) electron beams produced in the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) is accelerated in fully loaded cavities. Leading to a strong transient effect, the time evolution of the beam energy and its energy spread must be measured with at least 50MHz bandwidth. Three different detectors have been installed and tested so far on the three existing spectrometer lines of the machine: a secondary emission wire grid, a segmented beam dump and a segmented photomultiplier tube observing OTR emissions. This contribution describes the three devices and gives a comparison of the relative performances.