Bei Sun

Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States

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Publications (16)79.02 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Striatin is a novel protein that interacts with steroid receptors and modifies rapid, nongenomic activity in vitro. We tested the hypothesis that striatin would in turn affect mineralocorticoid receptor function and consequently sodium, water, and blood pressure homeostasis in an animal model. We evaluated salt sensitivity of blood pressure in novel striatin heterozygote knockout mice. Compared with wild type, striatin heterozygote exhibited a significant increase in blood pressure when sodium intake was increased from restricted (0.03%) to liberal (1.6%) sodium. Furthermore, renal expression of mineralocorticoid receptor and its genomic downstream targets serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1, and epithelial sodium channel was increased in striatin heterozygote versus wild-type mice on liberal sodium intake while the pAkt/Akt ratio, readout of mineralocorticoid receptor's rapid, nongenomic pathway, was reduced. To determine the potential clinical relevance of these findings, we tested the association between single nucleotide polymorphic variants of striatin gene and salt sensitivity of blood pressure in 366 white hypertensive subjects. HapMap-derived tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms identified an association of rs2540923 with salt sensitivity of blood pressure (odds ratio, 6.25; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-20; P=0.01). These data provide the first in vivo evidence in humans and rodents that associates striatin with markers of mineralocorticoid receptor activity. The data also support the hypothesis that the rapid, nongenomic mineralocorticoid receptor pathway (mediated via striatin) has a role in modulating the interaction between salt intake and blood pressure.
    Hypertension 11/2014; · 6.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Accumulating evidence shows an increase in insulin resistance on salt restriction. We compared the effect of low salt diet on insulin resistance in salt-sensitive versus salt-resistant hypertensive subjects. We also evaluated the relationship between salt sensitivity of blood pressure and salt sensitivity of insulin resistance in a multivariate regression model. Studies were conducted after 1 week of high salt (200 mmol per day sodium) and 1 week of low salt (10 mmol per day sodium) diet. Salt sensitivity was defined as the fall in systolic blood pressure >15 mmHg on low salt diet. The study includes 389 subjects (44% women; 16% blacks; body mass index, 28.5±4.2 kg/m(2)). As expected, blood pressure was lower on low salt (129±16/78±9 mmHg) as compared with high salt diet (145±18/86±10 mmHg). Fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and homeostasis model assessment were higher on low salt diet (95.4±19.4 mg/dL; 10.8±7.3 mIU/L; 2.6±1.9) as compared with high salt diet (90.6±10.8 mg/dL; 9.4±5.8 mIU/L; 2.1±1.4; P<0.0001 for all). There was no difference in homeostasis model assessment between salt-sensitive (n=193) versus salt-resistant (n=196) subjects on either diet. Increase in homeostasis model assessment on low salt diet was 0.5±1.4 in salt-sensitive and 0.4±1.5 in salt-resistant subjects (P=NS). On multivariate regression analysis, change in systolic blood pressure was not associated with change in homeostasis model assessment after including age, body mass index, sex, change in serum and urine aldosterone, and cortisol into the model. We conclude that the increase in insulin resistance on low salt diet is not affected by salt sensitivity of blood pressure.
    Hypertension 09/2014; · 6.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), vitamin D, and parathyroid hormone have all been implicated as regulators of adipocytokines and inflammation. We evaluated human interventional study protocols to investigate whether controlled modulations of these calcium- and sodium-regulatory hormones could influence adipocytokines and inflammation in obesity and diabetes. METHODS: Post-hoc analyses of two separate human protocols (Protocol 1, n=14; Protocol 2, n=24) conducted in a clinical research setting after rigorous control of diet, posture, medications, and diurnal rhythm, were performed. Protocol 1 evaluated obese hypertensives with vitamin D deficiency who received an infusion of angiotensin II (AngII) before and after 1month of vitamin D(3) therapy. Protocol 2 evaluated obese subjects with type 2 diabetes who also received AngII. Adipocytokines and inflammatory markers were measured before and after vitamin D(3) therapy, and also before and after infusions of AngII. RESULTS: Vitamin D(3) therapy significantly raised 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)(2)D concentrations, and lowered parathyroid hormone, but had no effect on concentrations of adiponectin, resistin, leptin, IL-6, PAI-1, urinary TGFβ1, or HOMA-IR. AngII infusions, despite significant elevations in blood pressure and serum aldosterone, did not influence adipocytokine concentrations in either protocol. CONCLUSION: In contrast to prior studies conducted in healthy populations, or those that could not control major regulators of the RAAS or adipocytokines, we observed that robust modulations in calcium- and sodium-regulatory hormones did not influence adipocytokines or inflammation in obesity or diabetes. Adipose-tissue physiology in these conditions may alter the hormonal regulation of inflammatory parameters.
    Metabolism: clinical and experimental 11/2012; · 3.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: How interactions of an individual's genetic background and environmental factors, such as dietary salt intake, result in age-associated blood pressure elevation is largely unknown. Lysine-specific demethylase-1 (LSD1) is a histone demethylase that mediates epigenetic regulation and modification of gene transcription. We have shown previously that hypertensive African-American minor allele carriers of the LSD1 single nucleotide polymorphism (rs587168) display blood pressure salt sensitivity. Our goal was to further examine the effects of LSD1 genotype variants on interactions between dietary salt intake, age, and blood pressure. We found that LSD1 single nucleotide polymorphism (rs7548692) predisposes to increasing salt sensitivity during aging in normotensive Caucasian subjects. Using a LSD1 heterozygous knockout mouse model, we compared blood pressure values on low (0.02 % Na(+)) vs. high (1.6 % Na(+)) salt intake. Our results demonstrate significantly increased blood pressure salt sensitivity in LSD1-deficient compared to wild-type animals with age, confirming our findings of salt sensitivity in humans. Elevated blood pressure in LSD1(+/-) mice is associated with total plasma volume expansion and altered renal Na(+) excretion. In summary, our human and animal studies demonstrate that LSD1 is a genetic factor that interacts with dietary salt intake modifying age-associated blood pressure increases and salt sensitivity through alteration of renal Na(+) handling.
    Age 10/2012; · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies have demonstrated that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the sodium-bicarbonate co-transporter gene (SLC4A5) are associated with hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that SNPs in SLC4A5 are associated with salt sensitivity of blood pressure in 185 whites consuming an isocaloric constant diet with a randomized order of 7 days of low Na(+) (10 mmol/d) and 7 days of high Na(+) (300 mmol/d) intake. Salt sensitivity was defined as a ≥7-mm Hg increase in mean arterial pressure during a randomized transition between high and low Na(+) diet. A total of 35 polymorphisms in 17 candidate genes were assayed, 25 of which were tested for association. Association analyses with salt sensitivity revealed 3 variants that associated with salt sensitivity, 2 in SLC4A5 (P<0.001) and 1 in GRK4 (P=0.020). Of these, 2 SNPs in SLC4A5 (rs7571842 and rs10177833) demonstrated highly significant results and large effects sizes, using logistic regression. These 2 SNPs had P values of 1.0×10(-4) and 3.1×10(-4) with odds ratios of 0.221 and 0.221 in unadjusted regression models, respectively, with the G allele at both sites conferring protection. These SNPs remained significant after adjusting for body mass index and age (P=8.9×10(-5) and 2.6×10(-4) and odds ratios 0.210 and 0.286, respectively). Furthermore, the association of these SNPs with salt sensitivity was replicated in a second hypertensive population. Meta-analysis demonstrated significant associations of both SNPs with salt sensitivity (rs7571842 [P=1.2×10(-5)]; rs1017783 [P=1.1×10(-4)]). In conclusion, SLC4A5 variants are strongly associated with salt sensitivity of blood pressure in 2 separate white populations.
    Hypertension 09/2012; 60(5):1359-66. · 6.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Both aldosterone and cortisol can activate the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). Polymorphisms in the MR gene have been inconsistently shown to be associated with risk of hypertension and aldosterone and cortisol levels. The purpose of this project was to investigate the association of MR gene variants with serum aldosterone and a previously identified hypertension subgroup with higher urinary free cortisol (UFC) levels (high-mode UFC) in a rigorously phenotyped Caucasian hypertensive cohort. Materials and Methods: A haplotype-based tagging single nucleotide polymorphism (htSNP) association study was conducted in the HyperPATH cohort of 570 hypertensive Caucasian subjects on a salt-controlled diet. Haplotypes generated from 74 htSNP representing the common genetic variations of the entire MR gene were analyzed by comparing high- vs. normal-mode UFC groups and the association with serum aldosterone levels. Results: Of the observed 20 haplotype blocks, there were three main linkage disequilibrium (LD) regions with high recombination rates between adjacent regions. Overlaying gene structure on this LD map revealed that block 1-8 corresponded to exon 5-9 [ligand binding domain (LBD)], blocks 9-18 to exon 3-4 [DNA binding domain (DBD)], and block 19-20 to exon 1-2 (N-terminal domain). Haplotype association results showed that DBD-aligned LD blocks were associated with high-mode UFC status (global P values, 0.0004 to 0.05). The LBD-aligned LD blocks showed significant associations with serum aldosterone levels. Conclusions: These findings imply that there may be differential functional importance of the DBD and LBD of the MR in the regulation of glucocorticoid and aldosterone levels in hypertensive subjects.
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 06/2012; 97(9):E1825-9. · 6.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hypertension (HTN) represents a complex heritable disease in which environmental factors may directly affect gene function via epigenetic mechanisms. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that dietary salt influences the activity of a histone-modifying enzyme, lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD-1), which in turn is associated with salt-sensitivity of blood pressure (BP). Animal and human studies were performed. Salt-sensitivity of LSD-1 expression was assessed in wild-type (WT) and LSD-1 heterozygote knockout (LSD-1(+/-)) mice. Clinical relevance was tested by multivariate associations between single-nuclear polymorphisms (SNPs) in the LSD-1 gene and salt-sensitivity of BP, with control of dietary sodium, in a primary African-American hypertensive cohort and two replication hypertensive cohorts (Caucasian and Mexican-American). LSD-1 expression was modified by dietary salt in WT mice with lower levels associated with liberal salt intake. LSD-1(+/-) mice expressed lower LSD-1 protein levels than WT mice in kidney tissue. Similar to LSD-1(+/-) mice, African-American minor allele carriers of two LSD-1 SNPs displayed greater change in systolic BP (SBP) in response to change from low to liberal salt diet (rs671357, P = 0.01; rs587168, P = 0.005). This association was replicated in the Hispanic (rs587168, P = 0.04) but not the Caucasian cohort. Exploratory analyses demonstrated decreased serum aldosterone concentrations in African-American minor allele carriers similar to findings in the LSD-1(+/-) mice, decreased α-EnaC expression in LSD-1(+/-) mice, and impaired renovascular responsiveness to salt loading in minor allele carriers. The results of this translational research study support a role for LSD-1 in the pathogenesis of salt-sensitive HTN.
    American Journal of Hypertension 04/2012; 25(7):812-7. · 3.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Vitamin D deficiency and obesity are associated with increased tissue renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity. The objective of the study was to evaluate whether vitamin D(3) therapy in obesity reduces tissue-RAS activity, as indicated by an increase in tissue sensitivity to angiotensin II (AngII). Participants included obese subjects with hypertension and 25-hydroxyvitamin D less than 25 ng/ml. Subjects were studied before and after 1 month of vitamin D(3) 15,000 IU/d, while in dietary sodium balance, and off all interfering medications. Fourteen subjects successfully completed all study procedures. The study was conducted at a clinical research center. At each study visit, tissue sensitivity to AngII was assessed by measuring renal plasma flow (RPF), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and adrenal secretion of aldosterone during an infusion of AngII. Subjects were then given captopril, and a second AngII infusion to evaluate the effect of captopril on tissue-RAS activity. Vitamin D(3) therapy increased 25-hydroxyvitamin D (18 to 52 ng/ml) and basal RPF (+5%) and lowered supine MAP (-3%) (all P < 0.01). There was a greater decline in RPF and higher stimulation of aldosterone with AngII infusion after vitamin D(3) therapy (both P < 0.05). As anticipated, captopril increased the renal-vascular, MAP, and adrenal sensitivity to AngII, but this effect was much smaller after vitamin D(3) therapy, indicating that vitamin D(3) therapy corrected the tissue sensitivity to AngII akin to captopril. Vitamin D(3) therapy in obese hypertensives modified RPF, MAP, and tissue sensitivity to AngII similar to converting enzyme inhibition. Whether chronic vitamin D(3) therapy abrogates the development of diseases associated with excess RAS activity warrants investigation.
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 04/2012; 97(7):2456-65. · 6.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Dietary sodium intake and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) on electrocardiogram (ECG) are both independent determinants of cardiovascular risk. Prior studies demonstrated that acute dietary sodium modulation significantly altered LVH-specific ECG voltage in hypertensive individuals, thus modifying cardiovascular risk prediction; but whether this phenomenon exists in normotensive individuals is not known. We evaluated the influence of dietary sodium intake on ECG voltage and ECG criteria for LVH in normotensive individuals. Retrospective evaluation of ECGs of healthy normotensive individuals (n = 39) who were prospectively randomized to a dietary study protocol of 1 week of high-sodium diet (>200 mmol of sodium per day) and 1 week of low-sodium diet (<10 mmol/d) was conducted. Electrocardiogram voltage amplitudes and biochemical assessments were performed at the end of each dietary intervention. As expected, blood pressure declined and measures of circulating renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activity rose significantly with low-sodium diet. No significant changes in specific LVH voltage criteria or overall precordial or limb lead ECG voltage amplitudes were detected between diets. Although immediate dietary sodium modulation has been shown to significantly alter LVH-specific ECG voltage and the detection of LVH in hypertensive individuals, dietary sodium intake did not influence ECG voltage in normotensive individuals. Healthy normotensive individuals may exhibit adaptive measures that dampen ECG voltage fluctuations in response to dietary sodium modulation. More specific cardiac imaging studies may provide additional insight into this observation and the influence of dietary sodium in cardiac health.
    Journal of Investigative Medicine 11/2011; 60(1):39-43. · 1.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Insulin resistance (IR) is a complex disorder caused by an interplay of both genetic and environmental factors. Recent studies identified a significant interaction between body mass index (BMI) and the rs1800795 polymorphism of the interleukin-6 gene that influences both IR and onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus, with obese individuals homozygous for the C allele demonstrating the highest level of IR and greatest risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Replication of a gene-environment interaction is important to confirm the validity of the initial finding and extend the generalizability of the results to other populations. Thus, the objective of this study was to replicate this gene-environment interaction on IR in a hypertensive population and perform a meta-analysis with prior published results. The replication analysis was performed using white individuals with hypertension from the Hypertensive Pathotype cohort (N = 311), genotyped for rs1800795. Phenotype studies were conducted after participants consumed 2 diets--high sodium (200 mmol/d) and low sodium (10 mmol/d)--for 7 days each. Measurements for plasma glucose, insulin, and interleukin-6 were obtained after 8 hours of fasting. Insulin resistance was characterized by the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR). In Hypertensive Pathotype, BMI was a significant effect modifier of the relationship between rs1800795 and HOMA-IR; higher BMI was associated with higher HOMA-IR among homozygote CC individuals when compared with major allele G carriers (P = .003). Furthermore, the meta-analysis in 1028 individuals confirmed the result, demonstrating the same significant interaction between rs1800795 and BMI on HOMA-IR (P = 1.05 × 10(-6)). This rare replication of a gene-environment interaction extends the generalizability of the results to hypertension while highlighting this polymorphism as a marker of IR in obese individuals.
    Metabolism: clinical and experimental 11/2011; 61(5):667-71. · 3.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) deficiency and excess activity of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are both associated with cardiovascular disease. Vitamin D interacts with the vitamin D receptor (VDR) to negatively regulate renin expression in mice; however, human studies linking genetic variation in the VDR with renin are lacking. We evaluated (i) whether genetic variation in the VDR at the Fok1 polymorphism was associated with plasma renin activity (PRA) in a population of hypertensives and a separate population of normotensives and (ii) whether the association between Fok1 genotype and PRA was independent of 25(OH)D levels. Genetic association study, assuming an additive model of inheritance, of 375 hypertensive and 146 normotensive individuals from the HyperPATH cohort, who had PRA assessments after 1 week of high dietary sodium balance (HS) and l week of low dietary sodium balance (LS). The minor allele (T) at the Fok1 polymorphism was significantly associated with lower PRA in hypertensives (LS: β = -0·22, P < 0·01; HS: β = -0·19, P < 0·01); when repeated in normotensives, a similar relationship was observed (LS: β = -0·17, P < 0·05; HS: β = -0·18, P = 0·14). In multivariable analyses, both higher 25(OH)D levels and the T allele at Fok1 were independently associated with lower PRA in hypertensives; however, 25(OH)D was not associated with PRA in normotensives. Genetic variation at the Fok1 polymorphism of the VDR gene, in combination with 25(OH)D levels, was associated with PRA in hypertension. These findings support the vitamin D-VDR complex as a potential regulator of renin activity in humans.
    Clinical Endocrinology 06/2011; 74(6):783-90. · 3.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The co-occurrence of insulin resistance (IR) and hypertension is a heritable condition leading to cardiovascular complications. Caveolin-1 (CAV1), a gene previously associated with metabolic dysfunction in animal and cellular models, may be a marker for these conditions in humans. The objective of the study was to examine the relationship between CAV1 variants and IR in two hypertensive cohorts and to corroborate the findings in a CAV1 knockout mouse. A candidate gene association study was conducted in two hypertensive cohorts: 1) Caucasian and 2) Hispanic. Multivariate associations between individual variants and insulin-resistant phenotypes were analyzed, accounting for age, gender, body mass index, and sibling relatedness. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests were conducted in wild-type and CAV1 knockout mice. In the Caucasian hypertensive cohort, minor allele carriers of two CAV1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (rs926198, rs3807989) had significantly higher fasting insulin levels (P = 0.005, P = 0.007), increased homeostatic assessment model for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (P =0.005, P = 0.008), and decreased M value during hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp procedure (P = 0.004, P = 0.05) than major allele homozygotes. Findings were replicated in the Hispanic hypertensive cohort cohort for fasting insulin levels (P = 0.005, P = 0.02) and HOMA-IR (P = 0.008 and P = 0.02). Meta-analysis demonstrated significant associations of both single-nucleotide polymorphisms with fasting insulin levels (P = 0.00008, P = 0.0004) and HOMA-IR (P = 0.0001, P = 0.0004). As compared with wild type, CAV1 knockout mice displayed higher blood pressure levels and higher fasting glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR levels and an exaggerated glycemic response to a glucose challenge. Variations in the CAV1 gene are associated with IR and hypertension. CAV1 gene polymorphisms may be a biomarker for IR and hypertension, enabling earlier detection and improved treatment strategies.
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 05/2011; 96(8):E1288-92. · 6.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The renin gene has been previously reported to be associated with essential hypertension in a variety of ethnic groups. However, no studies have systematically evaluated the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) representing coverage of the entire renin gene and hypertension risk. To evaluate the association between renin gene variation and hypertension we investigated data on HyperPATH cohort with 570 hypertensive and 222 normotensive Caucasian subjects. Six tagging SNPs and resultant haplotypes were tested for associations with hypertension risk, followed by mean arterial pressure (MAP), plasma renin activity (PRA) and the change in MAP in response to angiotensin II (AngII) infusion (AngII ΔMAP). The A allele of SNP rs6693954 and the haplotype containing rs6696954A were significantly associated with higher risk for hypertension (OR = 1.98, p = 0.0001; OR = 1.63 p = 0.0005, respectively). The same haplotype block was also associated with altered PRA levels and blunted AngII ΔMAP (global p-value = 0.02, 0.047, respectively). Our results confirm that polymorphisms in the renin gene are associated with increased risk for hypertension in an independent cohort, and that the underlying mechanism may reside in the interaction of renin activity and vascular responsiveness to angiotensin II.
    Journal of Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System 04/2011; 12(4):564-71. · 2.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to clarify the association of the angiotensinogen gene (AGT) with insulin sensitivity using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and haplotype analyses in a white cohort. A candidate gene association study was conducted in white persons with and without hypertension (N = 449). Seventeen SNPs of the AGT gene and their haplotypes were analyzed for an association with homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Multivariate regression model accounting for age, sex, body mass index, hypertension status, study site, and sibling relatedness was used to test the hypothesis. Nine of the 17 SNPs were significantly associated with lower HOMA-IR levels. Homozygous minor allele carriers of the most significant SNP, rs2493134 (GG), a surrogate for the gain-of-function mutation rs699 (AGT p.M268T), had significantly lower HOMA-IR levels (P = .0001) than heterozygous or homozygous major allele carriers (AG, AA). Direct genotyping of rs699 in a subset of the population showed similar results, with minor allele carriers exhibiting significantly decreased HOMA-IR levels (P = .003). Haplotype analysis demonstrated that haplotypes rs2493137A|rs5050A|rs3789678G|rs2493134A and rs2004776G|rs11122576A|rs699T|rs6687360G were also significantly associated with HOMA-IR (P = .0009, P = .02), and these results were driven by rs2493134 and rs699. This study confirms an association between the AGT gene and insulin sensitivity in white humans. Haplotype analysis extends this finding and implicates SNPs rs2493134 and rs699 as the most influential. Thus, AGT gene variants, previously shown to be associated with AGT levels, are also associated with insulin sensitivity; suggesting a relationship between the AGT gene, AGT levels, and insulin sensitivity in humans.
    Metabolism: clinical and experimental 02/2011; 60(8):1150-7. · 3.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) agonists often cause volume retention and edema. A relationship between PPARgamma and renin may play a role in this process. The aim was to examine the relationship between the PPARgamma gene and plasma renin activity (PRA) levels in human hypertension. DESIGN, PARTICIPANTS, AND MEASURES: A candidate gene association study was conducted with two distinct groups of human participants: Caucasian hypertensives (n = 395) and African-American hypertensives (n = 55). Single nucleotide polymorphisms of the PPAR(Upsilon) gene were analyzed. Phenotype studies were conducted after participants consumed a low-salt diet (10 mmol/d) for 7 d and included PRA and aldosterone measurements before and after a 60-min angiotensin II infusion (3 ng/kg x min). Participants homozygous for the minor allele of rs2959272 (CC) had significantly higher PRA levels at baseline (P = 0.016) than major allele carriers (AA, AC) in Caucasian-hypertensive participants. The association of the C allele carrier status with increased PRA levels was replicated in the group of African-American hypertensive participants (P = 0.027). The Fisher's combined P value for both observations was significant (P = 0.002). These results demonstrate the first known association between a PPARgamma single nucleotide polymorphism and alterations in PRA levels in humans with hypertension. This link between PPARgamma and renin raises the possibility of a genetically based mechanism for the increased volume retention and edema in some users of PPARgamma agonists.
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 09/2010; 95(9):E75-9. · 6.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Beta(2)-adrenergic receptor (beta2-AR) is a susceptibility locus for hypertension, and polymorphisms at this site relate to salt sensitivity and low plasma renin activity (PRA). The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) dietary pattern lowers blood pressure and appears to interact with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). We hypothesized that the DASH diet associates with increased RAAS activity, and genotype status at beta2-AR G46A modifies this response. We genotyped participants in the DASH-Sodium study (n = 372) at beta2-AR G46A to determine the association with blood pressure, RAAS components, and consumption of the DASH diet. We used 2-way mixed linear regression and an additive model for all primary analyses. Mean (+/-SEM) PRA was significantly higher in participants in the DASH group than in participants in the control group (0.68 +/- 0.03 compared with 0.54 +/- 0.03 ng x mL(-1) x h(-1), P = 0.002). Serum aldosterone, urinary aldosterone, and urinary potassium concentrations were also significantly higher in the DASH group (P < 0.01 for all). We observed significant gene-diet interactions for changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and concentrations of aldosterone and urinary potassium (P for interaction = 0.048, 0.017, and 0.001 for SBP and aldosterone and urinary potassium concentrations, respectively). There was an association between the A allele of beta2-AR G46A and greater blood pressure reduction and blunted aldosterone and PRA responses to the DASH diet. Our results indicate that the DASH diet lowers blood pressure and increases PRA and aldosterone concentrations. There is an association between the G46A polymorphism of beta2-AR and blood pressure and RAAS responses to the DASH diet, which suggests that beta2-AR may be a genetic modifier of DASH-diet responsiveness. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00000608.
    American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 08/2010; 92(2):444-9. · 6.50 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

78 Citations
79.02 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011–2014
    • Harvard Medical School
      • Department of Medicine
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2010–2012
    • Partners HealthCare
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2010–2011
    • Brigham and Women's Hospital
      • Department of Medicine
      Boston, MA, United States