Toshinori Mito

Tohoku University, Sendai-shi, Miyagi-ken, Japan

Are you Toshinori Mito?

Claim your profile

Publications (4)5.83 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between muscle conduction velocity (MCV) of the masseter muscle and the direction of mandibular growth. Longitudinal cephalometric X-rays taken at the prepubertal and postpubertal periods of 16 Japanese girls were analyzed. MCV was calculated from the delay in myoelectric signals obtained by using multiple surface electrode arrays placed along the fibers of the left masseter muscle in the postpubertal period. The direction of mandibular growth was evaluated by superimposition of the lateral cephalometric X-rays at the prepubertal and postpubertal periods. The relationship between MCV and the direction of mandibular growth was analyzed statistically. MCV was significantly correlated with the vertical facial height at the postpubertal period and the direction of mandibular condyle growth. If the relationship between prepubertal and postpubertal of MCV is clarified, it might be possible to predict the direction of mandibular growth and the vertical facial proportions at the postpubertal period from MCV of the masseter muscle at the prepubertal period.
    American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics 08/2005; 128(1):35-43; discussion 43-4. · 1.46 Impact Factor
  • Toshinori Mito, Koshi Sato, Hideo Mitani
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study assessed the possibility of using cervical vertebral bone age determined from cephalometric radiographs to predict mandibular growth potential. The subjects were 2 groups of 20 Japanese girls and young women: one group to derive a formula for predicting mandibular growth potential, the other to compare predicted values with actual values. Each group included subjects in the initial stage of the pubertal growth period and the final stage of growth in early adulthood. A formula for predicting mandibular growth potential that included cervical vertebral bone age and the actual growth of the mandible (condylion-gnathion) was determined with regression analysis. Cervical vertebral bone age, bone age on hand-wrist radiographs, and chronological age were inserted into the formula, and actual values and values predicted with these parameters of the formula for mandibular growth potential were compared. The formula found mandibular growth potential (in millimeters) = -2.76 x cervical vertebral bone age + 38.68. The average error between the value predicted by cervical vertebral bone age and the actual value (1.79 mm) was significantly less (P <.001) than that between the actual value and the value predicted by chronological age (3.48 mm) and approximately the same as that between the actual value and the value predicted by bone age (2.09 mm). The formula derived from this study might be useful for treating orthodontic patients in the growth stage.
    American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics 08/2003; 124(2):173-7. · 1.46 Impact Factor
  • Toshinori Mito, Koshi Sato, Hideo Mitani
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to establish cervical vertebral bone age as a new index for objectively evaluating skeletal maturation on cephalometric radiographs. Using cephalometric radiographs of 176 girls (ages 7.0-14.9 years), we measured cervical vertebral bodies and determined a regression formula to obtain cervical vertebral bone age. Next, using cephalometric and hand-wrist radiographs of another 66 girls (ages 8.0-13.9 years), we determined the correlation between cervical vertebral bone age and bone age using the Tanner-Whitehouse 2 method. The following results were obtained: (1) a regression formula was determined to obtain cervical vertebral bone age based on ratios of measurements in the third and fourth cervical vertebral bodies; (2) the correlation coefficient for the relationship between cervical vertebral bone age and bone age (0.869) was significantly (P <.05) higher than that for the relationship between cervical vertebral bone age and chronological age (0.705); and (3) the difference (absolute value) between the cervical vertebral bone age and bone age (0.75 years) was significantly (P <.001) smaller than that between cervical vertebral bone age and chronological age (1.17 years). These results suggest that cervical vertebral bone age reflects skeletal maturity because it approximates bone age, which is considered to be the most reliable method for evaluating skeletal maturation. Using cervical vertebral bone age, it might be possible to evaluate maturity in a detailed and objective manner on cephalometric radiographs.
    American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics 10/2002; 122(4):380-5. · 1.46 Impact Factor
  • K Sato, T Mito, H Mitani
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Mandibular growth prediction provides important information for planning treatment and for evaluating occlusal stability after treatment. At present, several methods can predict mandibular growth, but it is not clear which method is the most accurate. This study compared the predictive error of several methods by using skeletal maturity indicators. Twenty-two longitudinal cephalograms and hand-wrist radiographs of female subjects (average initial age, 8.3 years; final age, 18.4 years) were collected to construct the prediction formula. Another 22 female subjects (initial age, 10.8 years; final age, 18.6 years) were examined to compare differences between the predicted values and the actual values. Mandibular total length (condylion-gnathion) at the final stage can be accurately predicted by (1) the ossification events of the third middle phalanx and the radius, (2) the growth potential method, (3) the growth percentage method, (4) the multiple regression method, and (5) the growth chart method. Bone age as a parameter was calculated by both the Tanner-Whitehouse 2 (TW2) method and the computer-aided skeletal maturity assessment system (CASMAS) that we developed. The average error between the predicted length of condylion to gnathion and the actual length at the final stage for each method was (1) 3.0 mm; (2) 2.1 mm (TW2), 2.4 mm (CASMAS); (3) 2.3 mm (TW2), 2.6 mm (CASMAS); (4) 4.3 mm (TW2), 4.9 mm (CASMAS); and (5) 3.6 mm (TW2), 3.7 mm (CASMAS). The growth potential method and the growth percentage method were the most accurate predictors of mandibular growth potential.
    American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics 10/2001; 120(3):286-93. · 1.46 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

60 Citations
5.83 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2002–2003
    • Tohoku University
      • Graduate School of Dentistry
      Sendai-shi, Miyagi-ken, Japan