Begoña Sanz

Biocruces Health Research Institute, Baracaldo, Basque Country, Spain

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Publications (19)33.75 Total impact

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    Ref. No: ES2455745, Year: 07/2015
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    ABSTRACT: Aminopeptidase N (APN; EC 3.4.11.2) is a membrane dimeric metallopeptidase involved in differentiation, development, and proliferative processes of several tissues. Recent studies have demonstrated the increased expression and activity of this enzyme in several cancers. However, there are no available data about the impact of this peptidase in the biological aggressiveness and the survival of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. The activity and mRNA expression of APN in tumor tissue (n = 81) and plasma (n = 40) of patients with CRC of low and high grades and stages were prospectively analyzed by fluorimetric and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction methods. Data obtained in adenoma and CRC were compared with those from the surrounding normal mucosa. Classic clinical and pathological parameters were stratified following APN data and analyzed for 5-year survival. mRNA levels of APN (ANPEP) were lower in colorectal adenomas and adenocarcinomas than in the surrounding uninvolved mucosa (Kruskal-Wallis, P < 0.001). Aminopeptidase N activity in CRC tissue was higher in patients with better overall survival (log-rank P < 0.05, Cox analysis P < 0.05). By contrast, higher plasmatic APN activity correlated with worse overall survival (log-rank P < 0.01, Cox analysis P < 0.05). Aminopeptidase N activity in tissue and plasma from CRC patients is an independent prognostic factor of 5-year survival. The determination of APN activity levels in the plasma may be a safe, minimally invasive, and inexpensive way to define the aggressiveness of CRC in daily practice.
    Journal of Investigative Medicine 04/2015; 63:740-746. DOI:10.1097/JIM.0000000000000199 · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (EC 3.4.14.5) (DPPIV) is a serine peptidase involved in cell differentiation, adhesion, immune modulation and apoptosis, functions that control neoplastic transformation. Previous studies have demonstrated altered expression and activity of tissue and circulating DPPIV in several cancers and proposed its potential usefulness for early diagnosis in colorectal cancer (CRC). The activity and mRNA and protein expression of DPPIV was prospectively analyzed in adenocarcinomas, adenomas, uninvolved colorectal mucosa and plasma from 116 CRC patients by fluorimetric, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemical methods. Results were correlated with the most important classic pathological data related to aggressiveness and with 5-year survival rates. Results showed that: 1) mRNA levels and activity of DPPIV increased in colorectal neoplasms (Kruskal-Wallis test, p<0.01); 2) Both adenomas and CRCs displayed positive cytoplasmic immunostaining with luminal membrane reinforcement; 3) Plasmatic DPPIV activity was lower in CRC patients than in healthy subjects (Mann-U test, p<0.01); 4) Plasmatic DPPIV activity was associated with worse overall and disease-free survivals (log-rank p<0.01, Cox analysis p<0.01). 1) Up-regulation of DPPIV in colorectal tumors suggests a role for this enzyme in the neoplastic transformation of colorectal tissues. This finding opens the possibility for new therapeutic targets in these patients. 2) Plasmatic DPPIV is an independent prognostic factor in survival of CRC patients. The determination of DPPIV activity levels in the plasma may be a safe, minimally invasive and inexpensive way to define the aggressiveness of CRC in daily practice.
    PLoS ONE 01/2015; 10:e0119436. DOI:10.7150/ijms.7178 · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Advances in the knowledge of renal neoplasms have demonstrated the implication of several proteases in their genesis, growth and dissemination. Glutamyl-aminopeptidase (GAP) (EC. 3.4.11.7) is a zinc metallopeptidase with angiotensinase activity highly expressed in kidney tissues and its expression and activity have been associated wtih tumour development. Methods In this prospective study, GAP spectrofluorometric activity and immunohistochemical expression were analysed in clear-cell (CCRCC), papillary (PRCC) and chromophobe (ChRCC) renal cell carcinomas, and in renal oncocytoma (RO). Data obtained in tumour tissue were compared with those from the surrounding uninvolved kidney tissue. In CCRCC, classic pathological parameters such as grade, stage and tumour size were stratified following GAP data and analyzed for 5-year survival. Results GAP activity in both the membrane-bound and soluble fractions was sharply decreased and its immunohistochemical expression showed mild staining in the four histological types of renal tumours. Soluble and membrane-bound GAP activities correlated with tumour grade and size in CCRCCs. Conclusions This study suggests a role for GAP in the neoplastic development of renal tumours and provides additional data for considering the activity and expression of this enzyme of interest in the diagnosis and prognosis of renal neoplasms.
    BMC Cancer 05/2014; 14(1):386. DOI:10.1186/1471-2407-14-386 · 3.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background. Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), follicular thyroid adenoma (FTA), and thyroid nodular hyperplasia (TNH) are the most frequent diseases of the thyroid gland. Previous studies described the involvement of dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPPIV/CD26) in the development of thyroid neoplasia and proposed it as an additional tool in the diagnosis/prognosis of these diseases. However, very little is known about the involvement of other peptidases in neoplastic and hyperplastic processes of this gland. Methods. The catalytic activity of 10 peptidases in a series of 30 PTC, 10 FTA, and 14 TNH was measured fluorimetrically in tumour and nontumour adjacent tissues. Results. The activity of DPPIV/CD26 was markedly higher in PTC than in FTA, TNH, and nontumour tissues. Aspartyl aminopeptidase (AspAP), alanyl aminopeptidase (AlaAP), prolyl endopeptidase, pyroglutamyl peptidase I, and aminopeptidase B activities were significantly increased in thyroid neoplasms when compared to nontumour tissues. AspAP and AlaAP activities were also significantly higher in PTC than in FTA and TNH. Conclusions. These data suggest the involvement of DPPIV/CD26 and some cytosolic peptidases in the neoplastic development of PTC and FTA. Further studies will help to define the possible clinical usefulness of AlaAP and AspAP in the diagnosis/prognosis of thyroid neoplasms.
    Disease markers 11/2013; 35(6):825-32. DOI:10.1155/2013/970736 · 2.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Aspartyl aminopeptidase (ASP; EC 3.4.11.21) is a widely distributed and abundant cytosolic enzyme that regulates bioactive peptides such as angiotensin II. It has been demonstrated that the expression and activity of this enzyme is modified in tissue and serum of patients with several types of cancer. However, the involvement of ASP in the neoplastic development and survival of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) has not been analyzed to date. The activity and messenger RNA expression of ASP in tumor tissue (n = 71) and plasma (n = 40) of patients with CRC was analyzed prospectively using fluorometric and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction methods. Data obtained from tumor tissue were compared with those from the surrounding normal mucosa. Classic pathologic parameters (grade, stage, nodal invasion, distant metastases and perineural, lymphatic, and vascular invasion) were stratified following ASP data and analyzed for 5-year survival. ASP was upregulated in CRC tissues, and greater activity correlated significantly with the absence of lymph node metastases and with better overall survival. Inversely, greater plasmatic ASP activity was associated with worse overall and disease-free survival. Data suggest that ASP is involved in colorectal neoplasia and point to this enzyme as a potential useful diagnostic tool in clinical practice.
    Translational Research 08/2013; 162(5). DOI:10.1016/j.trsl.2013.07.010 · 4.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To analyse the mRNA and protein expression of cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 in chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (ChRCC) and renal oncocytoma (RO). DESIGN & METHODS: Fresh and formalin-fixed tissue samples of ChRCC and RO were analysed by using real-time quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemical techniques (n=40). RESULTS: Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that CB1 mRNA was underexpressed by 12-fold in ChRCC and had a variable expression in RO. CB1 protein showed intense positive immunostaining in both neoplasms. Both CB2 mRNA and protein were not expressed in tumor and non tumor renal tissue. CONCLUSION: This distinct immunoprofile may eventually be used as an additional tool with practical interest in the differential diagnosis of renal tumors.
    Clinical biochemistry 01/2013; DOI:10.1016/j.clinbiochem.2012.12.023 · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Several studies have proposed that protease expression and activity may have a predictive value in the survival of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC). Most efforts in this issue have been focused on the analysis of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and very little on the role of other proteases, such as peptidases. The catalytic activity of 9 peptidases (APN, APB, ASP, CAP, DPP-IV, NEP/CD10, PEP, PGI, and PSA) was quantified by fluorimetric methods in a series of 79 CCRCC and the obtained results analyzed for survival (Kaplan-Meier curves, log-rank test and Cox multivariate analysis). CCRCC with higher activity levels of membrane-bound APN and soluble APN, DPP-IV and CAP had significantly shorter 5-year survival rates than those with lower levels. By contrast, higher soluble APB activity significantly correlated with longer survivals. Our data suggest the involvement of peptidases in the biological aggressiveness of CCRCC and support the usefulness of measuring these proteases to assess the prognosis of patients with CCRCC.
    AJP Renal Physiology 09/2012; 303(12). DOI:10.1152/ajprenal.00477.2012 · 4.42 Impact Factor
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    International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology 02/2012; 76(2):305. DOI:10.1016/j.ijporl.2011.11.017 · 1.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To analyze soluble and membrane-bound peptidase activities in the tonsils and adenoids removed from patients with adenoid hyperplasia, tonsillar hyperplasia and chronic tonsillitis. A total of 48 tissue samples from patients undergoing adenoidectomy and tonsillectomy for adenoid hyperplasia, tonsillar hyperplasia or chronic tonsillitis were analyzed. The catalytic activity of a pool of peptidases in the soluble (dipeptidyl peptidase IV, aminopeptidase A, aminopeptidase N and cystinyl aminopeptidase) and membrane-bound (prolyl endopeptidase, aspartyl aminopeptidase, aminopeptidase B and pyroglutamyl peptidase I) fractions was measured fluorometrically. The activity of membrane-bound aminopeptidase B was higher in cases of chronic tonsillitis and adenoid hyperplasia than in tonsillar hyperplasia, p=0.004. Soluble dipeptidyl peptidase IV and membrane-bound pyroglutamyl peptidase I were found to be more active in tissues from male chronic tonsillitis tissues, p<0.05, while membrane-bound aminopeptidase B activity was higher in tissues of females with tonsillar hyperplasia, p<0.001. In the case of chronic tonsillitis, soluble aminopeptidase A was found to have a higher level of activity in tissues from children than those from adults, p=0.005. Our results suggest a potential role of soluble aminopeptidase A, soluble dipeptidyl peptidase IV, membrane-bound aminopeptidase B and membrane-bound pyroglutamyl peptidase I in the pathobiology of adenoid hyperplasia, tonsillar hyperplasia and chronic tonsillitis that is differently regulated as a function of gender. These finfings may modify in the future the clinical approach to these diseases.
    International journal of pediatric otorhinolaryngology 09/2011; 75(11):1399-403. DOI:10.1016/j.ijporl.2011.07.037 · 1.32 Impact Factor
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    23rd European Congress of Pathology. August 27-September 1, 2011. Helsinki, Finland., Helsinki, Finland.; 09/2011
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    23rd European Congress of Pathology. August 27-September 1, 2011. Helsinki, Finland., Helsinki, Finland.; 09/2011
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    23rd European Congress of Pathology. August 27-September 1, 2011. Helsinki, Finland., Helsinki, Finland.; 09/2011
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    ABSTRACT: To analyse peptidase activities in the removed tonsils and adenoids from patients with chronic tonsillitis, tonsillar hyperplasia and adenoid hyperplasia. We have analyzed 48 tissue samples from patients undergoing tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy for chronic tonsillitis, tonsillar hyperplasia or adenoid hyperplasia. Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy samples were collected and frozen for later enzyme analysis. The catalytic activity of a pool of peptidases (dipeptidyl peptidase IV, prolyl endopeptidase, aminopeptidase A, aminopeptidase N, aspartyl aminopeptidase, aminopeptidase B, neutral endopeptidase, pyroglutamyl peptidase I, puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase and cystinyl aminopeptidase) was measured fluorometrically. The activity of prolyl endopeptidase was higher in tonsillar hyperplasia and adenoid hyperplasia than in chronic tonsillitis. On the contrary, dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity was higher in chronic tonsillitis than in hypertrophic tissues. When data were stratified by age and gender, dipeptidyl peptidase IV was also found to be more active in adult and male chronic tonsillitis tissues. Inversely, dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity was higher in tissues of females with tonsillar hyperplasia. These data indicate the involvement of dipeptidyl peptidase IV and prolyl endopeptidase in the mechanisms underlying chronic tonsillitis, tonsillar hyperplasia and adenoid hyperplasia.
    International journal of pediatric otorhinolaryngology 03/2011; 75(3):347-50. DOI:10.1016/j.ijporl.2010.11.028 · 1.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The angiotensin-converting enzymes (ACE and ACE2) are highly expressed in renal tubules and play an important role in the regulation of renal function by the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (iRAS). Dysregulation of these cell-surface peptidases has been associated with renal injury. Most of these studies, however, have focused on non-neoplastic kidney diseases. In the present study, ACE and ACE2 activity and protein and mRNA expression were analysed in a subset of clear-cell (CCRCC) and chromophobe (ChRCC) renal cell carcinomas, and in renal oncocytoma (RO). Enzyme activity was measured by spectrofluorometric (ACE2) and spectrophotometric assays (ACE), and protein and mRNA expression were determined by immunohistochemistry and qRT-PCR assays, respectively. The enzyme activities and immunohistochemistry showed that both enzymes are mainly downregulated in these neoplasms. qRT-PCR studies in CCRCC showed no positive correlation between ACE and ACE2 activity/protein expression and mRNA levels, whereas downregulation of ACE2 mRNA levels was observed in tumors from the distal nephron (ChRCC and RO). These findings suggest a metabolic imbalance in iRAS and a role of this system in renal neoplastic diseases, and point to ACE and ACE2 as potential prognostic/diagnostic markers.
    Regulatory Peptides 12/2010; 165(2-3):218-23. DOI:10.1016/j.regpep.2010.07.170 · 2.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Several studies in cell cultures and in animal models have demonstrated that cannabinoids have important antitumoral properties. Because many of these effects are mediated through cannabinoid (CB) receptors CB₁ and CB₂, the study of their expression in human neoplasms has become of great interest in recent years. Fresh and formalin-fixed tissue samples of 20 consecutive clear cell renal cell carcinomas (CCRCCs) were collected prospectively and analyzed for the expression of both CB receptors by using RT-PCR, Western blot (WB), and immunohistochemical techniques. RT-PCR assays demonstrated the expression of mRNA encoding the CB₁ in tumor tissue and in adjacent non-neoplastic kidney. Conversely, WB and IHC revealed a marked downregulation of CB₁ protein in tumor tissue; CB₂ was not expressed. The obtained data suggest a possible implication of the endocannabinoid system in renal carcinogenesis. A posttranscriptional downregulation of CB₁ and the absence of expression of CB₂ characterize CCRCC.
    Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry 12/2010; 58(12):1129-34. DOI:10.1369/jhc.2010.957126 · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The presence of CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors and their physiological role in the kidney has been described in animal models but not in humans. Our aim in this study was to evaluate the presence of these receptors in human kidney, adult and fetal. For this purpose, RT-PCR, western-blot and immunohisto-chemical assays were performed. RT-PCR confirmed the presence of CB1 receptor mRNA receptor and the absence of the CB2 receptor mRNA in adult and fetal kidney. Western-blot and immunohistochemical assays revealed the presence of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor protein, which displayed a similar distribution in fetal and adult kidneys. Proximal and distal convoluted tubule cells and intercalated cells in the collecting ducts showed marked positivity. Conversely, the CB2 cannabinoid receptor protein was consistently negative in all cases. Our data suggest a possible implication of the endocannabinoid system in the physiology and development of the human kidney.
    Histology and histopathology 09/2010; 25(9):1133-8. · 2.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Renal cancer is one of the ten most common malignant tumours in humans and its histological classification, best clinical management and treatment strategies are continuously debated. Roughly 10% of renal carcinomas are papillary renal cell carcinomas (RCCs), a histologically well characterized tumour subtype that is linked to alterations on chromosomes 7 and 17. Peptidases are proteolytic enzymes known to be involved in oncological processes, although their precise role in renal cancer is poorly understood. Eighteen papillary RCCs were selected for the study. Tumour and normal tissue samples were frozen for enzymatic analysis. The catalytic activity for a pool of peptidases (EC numbers: 3.4.11.14; 3.4.11.2; 3.4.11.6; 3.4.11.21; 3.4.11.7; 3.4.14.5; 3.4.24.11; 3.4.21.26; 3.4.19.3) was measured fluorometrically. Statistically significant decreases were observed in the following cell surface activities: EC.3.4.11.2 (six-fold decrease in tumour vs. non-tumour); 3.4.11.6 (five-fold decrease); 3.4.11.7 (eight-fold decrease); 3.4.24.11 (four-fold decrease). No significant alterations were observed in the soluble activities. These data confirm the involvement of cell-surface peptidases in the mechanisms underlying RCC aetiogenesis and suggest that the peptidase activity profile in the RCC may be a diagnostic/prognostic marker.
    Anticancer research 04/2010; 30(4):1137-41. · 1.87 Impact Factor