Sunday M Stray

University of Washington Seattle, Seattle, WA, United States

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Publications (10)110.95 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: RAD51D, a gene in the Fanconi Anemia-BRCA homologous recombination pathway, has recently been shown to harbor germline mutations responsible for ovarian carcinoma in multiply affected families. We aimed to extend these results to ovarian carcinoma in the general population. METHODS: We sequenced RAD51D in germline DNA from 360 individuals with primary ovarian, peritoneal or fallopian tube carcinoma who were not selected for age of cancer onset or family history. We also sequenced RAD51D in 459 probands from 226 high risk breast cancer families who were wild type for 21 breast and ovarian cancer genes. RESULTS: Of 360 cases, three (0.8%) carried loss-of-function mutations in RAD51D. All three subjects had ovarian carcinoma; one was also diagnosed with a synchronous endometrial carcinoma. Only one of the three subjects had a family history of breast or ovarian cancer. Combined with previous data for this series, 23.9% of women with unselected ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal carcinoma carried a germline loss-of-function mutation in any of 13 tumor suppressor genes. Among the 449 women and 10 men with familial breast cancer, none carried a loss of function mutation in RAD51D. CONCLUSIONS: These data support the previous observation that loss-of-function mutations in RAD51D predispose to ovarian carcinoma but not to breast carcinoma. We conclude that inherited ovarian cancer is highly heterogeneous genetically, and that approximately one in four ovarian carcinoma patients carry a germline mutation in a known tumor suppressor gene that confers high risk.
    Gynecologic Oncology 09/2012; · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pentosuria is one of four conditions hypothesized by Archibald Garrod in 1908 to be inborn errors of metabolism. Mutations responsible for the other three conditions (albinism, alkaptonuria, and cystinuria) have been identified, but the mutations responsible for pentosuria remained unknown. Pentosuria, which affects almost exclusively individuals of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, is characterized by high levels of the pentose sugar L-xylulose in blood and urine and deficiency of the enzyme L-xylulose reductase. The condition is autosomal-recessive and completely clinically benign, but in the early and mid-20th century attracted attention because it was often confused with diabetes mellitus and inappropriately treated with insulin. Persons with pentosuria were identified from records of Margaret Lasker, who studied the condition in the 1930s to 1960s. In the DCXR gene encoding L-xylulose reductase, we identified two mutations, DCXR c.583ΔC and DCXR c.52(+1)G > A, each predicted to lead to loss of enzyme activity. Of nine unrelated living pentosuric subjects, six were homozygous for DCXR c.583ΔC, one was homozygous for DCXR c.52(+1)G > A, and two were compound heterozygous for the two mutant alleles. L-xylulose reductase was not detectable in protein lysates from subjects' cells and high levels of xylulose were detected in their sera, confirming the relationship between the DCXR genotypes and the pentosuric phenotype. The combined frequency of the two mutant DCXR alleles in 1,067 Ashkenazi Jewish controls was 0.0173, suggesting a pentosuria frequency of approximately one in 3,300 in this population. Haplotype analysis indicated that the DCXR c.52(+1)G > A mutation arose more recently than the DCXR c.583ΔC mutation.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 11/2011; 108(45):18313-7. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Inherited loss-of-function mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 and other tumor suppressor genes predispose to ovarian carcinomas, but the overall burden of disease due to inherited mutations is not known. Using targeted capture and massively parallel genomic sequencing, we screened for germ-line mutations in 21 tumor suppressor genes in genomic DNA from women with primary ovarian, peritoneal, or fallopian tube carcinoma. Subjects were consecutively enrolled at diagnosis and not selected for age or family history. All classes of mutations, including point mutations and large genomic deletions and insertions, were detected. Of 360 subjects, 24% carried germ-line loss-of-function mutations: 18% in BRCA1 or BRCA2 and 6% in BARD1, BRIP1, CHEK2, MRE11A, MSH6, NBN, PALB2, RAD50, RAD51C, or TP53. Six of these genes were not previously implicated in inherited ovarian carcinoma. Primary carcinomas were generally characterized by genomic loss of normal alleles of the mutant genes. Of women with inherited mutations, >30% had no family history of breast or ovarian carcinoma, and >35% were 60 y or older at diagnosis. More patients with ovarian carcinoma carry cancer-predisposing mutations and in more genes than previously appreciated. Comprehensive genetic testing for inherited carcinoma is warranted for all women with ovarian, peritoneal, or fallopian tube carcinoma, regardless of age or family history. Clinical genetic testing is currently done gene by gene, with each test costing thousands of dollars. In contrast, massively parallel sequencing allows such testing for many genes simultaneously at low cost.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 11/2011; 108(44):18032-7. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Individuals with autism are more likely to carry rare inherited and de novo copy number variants (CNVs). However, further research is needed to establish which CNVs are causal and the mechanisms by which these CNVs influence autism. We examined genomic DNA of children with autism (N = 41) and healthy controls (N = 367) for rare CNVs using a high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization platform. We show that individuals with autism are more likely to harbor rare CNVs as small as ∼ 10 kb, a threshold not previously detectable, and that CNVs in cases disproportionately affect genes involved in transcription, nervous system development, and receptor activity. We also show that a subset of genes that have known or suspected allele-specific or imprinting effects and are within rare-case CNVs may undergo loss of transcript expression. In particular, expression of CNTNAP2 and ZNF214 are decreased in probands compared with their unaffected transmitting parents. Furthermore, expression of PRODH and ARID1B, two genes affected by de novo CNVs, are decreased in probands compared with controls. These results suggest that for some genes affected by CNVs in autism, reduced transcript expression may be a mechanism of pathogenesis during neurodevelopment.
    European journal of human genetics: EJHG 03/2011; 19(6):727-31. · 3.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Inherited mutations in the BRCA2-interacting protein PALB2 are known to be associated with increased risks of developing breast cancer. To evaluate the contribution of PALB2 to familial breast cancer in the United States, we sequenced the coding sequences and flanking regulatory regions of the gene from constitutional genomic DNA of 1,144 familial breast cancer patients with wild-type sequences at BRCA1 and BRCA2. Overall, 3.4% (33/972) of patients not selected by ancestry and 0% (0/172) of patients specifically of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry were heterozygous for a nonsense, frameshift, or frameshift-associated splice mutation in PALB2. Mutations were detected in both male and female breast cancer patients. All mutations were individually rare: the 33 heterozygotes harbored 13 different mutations, 5 previously reported and 8 novel mutations. PALB2 heterozygotes were 4-fold more likely to have a male relative with breast cancer (P = 0.0003), 6-fold more likely to have a relative with pancreatic cancer (P = 0.002), and 1.3-fold more likely to have a relative with ovarian cancer (P = 0.18). Compared with their female relatives without mutations, increased risk of developing breast cancer for female PALB2 heterozygotes was 2.3-fold (95% CI: 1.5-4.2) by age 55 and 3.4-fold (95% CI: 2.4-5.9) by age 85. Loss of the wild-type PALB2 allele was observed in laser-dissected tumor specimens from heterozygous patients. Given this mutation prevalence and risk, consideration might be given to clinical testing of PALB2 by complete genomic sequencing for familial breast cancer patients with wild-type sequences at BRCA1 and BRCA2.
    Cancer Research 02/2011; 71(6):2222-9. · 9.28 Impact Factor
  • Gynecologic Oncology - GYNECOL ONCOL. 01/2011; 121(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Inherited loss-of-function mutations in the tumor suppressor genes BRCA1, BRCA2, and multiple other genes predispose to high risks of breast and/or ovarian cancer. Cancer-associated inherited mutations in these genes are collectively quite common, but individually rare or even private. Genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations has become an integral part of clinical practice, but testing is generally limited to these two genes and to women with severe family histories of breast or ovarian cancer. To determine whether massively parallel, "next-generation" sequencing would enable accurate, thorough, and cost-effective identification of inherited mutations for breast and ovarian cancer, we developed a genomic assay to capture, sequence, and detect all mutations in 21 genes, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, with inherited mutations that predispose to breast or ovarian cancer. Constitutional genomic DNA from subjects with known inherited mutations, ranging in size from 1 to >100,000 bp, was hybridized to custom oligonucleotides and then sequenced using a genome analyzer. Analysis was carried out blind to the mutation in each sample. Average coverage was >1200 reads per base pair. After filtering sequences for quality and number of reads, all single-nucleotide substitutions, small insertion and deletion mutations, and large genomic duplications and deletions were detected. There were zero false-positive calls of nonsense mutations, frameshift mutations, or genomic rearrangements for any gene in any of the test samples. This approach enables widespread genetic testing and personalized risk assessment for breast and ovarian cancer.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 07/2010; 107(28):12629-33. · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In communities with high rates of consanguinity and consequently high prevalence of recessive phenotypes, homozygosity mapping with SNP arrays is an effective approach for gene discovery. In 20 Palestinian kindreds with prelingual nonsyndromic hearing loss, we generated homozygosity profiles reflecting linkage to the phenotype. Family sizes ranged from small nuclear families with two affected children, one unaffected sibling, and parents to multigenerational kindreds with 12 affected relatives. By including unaffected parents and siblings and screening 250 K SNP arrays, even small nuclear families yielded informative profiles. In 14 families, we identified the allele responsible for hearing loss by screening a single candidate gene in the longest homozygous region. Novel alleles included missense, nonsense, and splice site mutations of CDH23, MYO7A, MYO15A, OTOF, PJVK, Pendrin/SLC26A4, TECTA, TMHS, and TMPRSS3, and a large genomic deletion of Otoancorin (OTOA). All point mutations were rare in the Palestinian population (zero carriers in 288 unrelated controls); the carrier frequency of the OTOA genomic deletion was 1%. In six families, we identified five genomic regions likely to harbor novel genes for human hearing loss on chromosomes 1p13.3 (DFNB82), 9p23-p21.2/p13.3-q21.13 (DFNB83), 12q14.3-q21.2 (DFNB84; two families), 14q23.1-q31.1, and 17p12-q11.2 (DFNB85).
    European journal of human genetics: EJHG 11/2009; 18(4):407-13. · 3.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Schizophrenia is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder whose genetic influences remain elusive. We hypothesize that individually rare structural variants contribute to the illness. Microdeletions and microduplications >100 kilobases were identified by microarray comparative genomic hybridization of genomic DNA from 150 individuals with schizophrenia and 268 ancestry-matched controls. All variants were validated by high-resolution platforms. Novel deletions and duplications of genes were present in 5% of controls versus 15% of cases and 20% of young-onset cases, both highly significant differences. The association was independently replicated in patients with childhood-onset schizophrenia as compared with their parents. Mutations in cases disrupted genes disproportionately from signaling networks controlling neurodevelopment, including neuregulin and glutamate pathways. These results suggest that multiple, individually rare mutations altering genes in neurodevelopmental pathways contribute to schizophrenia.
    Science 04/2008; 320(5875):539-43. · 31.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Genetic testing for inherited mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 has become integral to the care of women with a severe family history of breast or ovarian cancer, but an unknown number of patients receive negative (ie, wild-type) results when they actually carry a pathogenic BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. Furthermore, other breast cancer genes generally are not evaluated. To determine the frequency and types of undetected cancer-predisposing mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, TP53, and PTEN among patients with breast cancer from high-risk families with negative (wild-type) genetic test results for BRCA1 and BRCA2. Between 2002-2005, probands from 300 US families with 4 or more cases of breast or ovarian cancer but with negative (wild-type) commercial genetic test results for BRCA1 and BRCA2 were screened by multiple DNA-based and RNA-based methods to detect genomic rearrangements in BRCA1 and BRCA2 and germline mutations of all classes in CHEK2, TP53, and PTEN. Previously undetected germline mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, TP53, and PTEN that predispose to breast cancer; frequencies of these mutations among families with negative genetic test results. Of the 300 probands, 52 (17%) carried previously undetected mutations, including 35 (12%) with genomic rearrangements of BRCA1 or BRCA2, 14 (5%) with CHEK2 mutations, and 3 (1%) with TP53 mutations. At BRCA1 and BRCA2, 22 different genomic rearrangements were found, of sizes less than 1 kb to greater than 170 kb; of these, 14 were not previously described and all were individually rare. At CHEK2, a novel 5.6-kb genomic deletion was discovered in 2 families of Czechoslovakian ancestry. This deletion was found in 8 of 631 (1.3%) patients with breast cancer and in none of 367 healthy controls in the Czech and Slovak Republics. For all rearrangements, exact genomic breakpoints were determined and diagnostic primers validated. The 3 families with TP53 mutations included cases of childhood sarcoma or brain tumors in addition to multiple cases of breast cancer. The mutational spectra of BRCA1 and BRCA2 include many high-penetrance, individually rare genomic rearrangements. Among patients with breast cancer and severe family histories of cancer who test negative (wild type) for BRCA1 and BRCA2, approximately 12% can be expected to carry a large genomic deletion or duplication in one of these genes, and approximately 5% can be expected to carry a mutation in CHEK2 or TP53. Effective methods for identifying these mutations should be made available to women at high risk.
    JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association 04/2006; 295(12):1379-88. · 29.98 Impact Factor