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Publications (7)147.16 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: VKORC1 and CYP2C9 are important contributors to warfarin dose variability, but explain less variability for individuals of African descent than for those of European or Asian descent. We aimed to identify additional variants contributing to warfarin dose requirements in African Americans. METHODS: We did a genome-wide association study of discovery and replication cohorts. Samples from African-American adults (aged ≥18 years) who were taking a stable maintenance dose of warfarin were obtained at International Warfarin Pharmacogenetics Consortium (IWPC) sites and the University of Alabama at Birmingham (Birmingham, AL, USA). Patients enrolled at IWPC sites but who were not used for discovery made up the independent replication cohort. All participants were genotyped. We did a stepwise conditional analysis, conditioning first for VKORC1 -1639G→A, followed by the composite genotype of CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9*3. We prespecified a genome-wide significance threshold of p<5×10(-8) in the discovery cohort and p<0·0038 in the replication cohort. FINDINGS: The discovery cohort contained 533 participants and the replication cohort 432 participants. After the prespecified conditioning in the discovery cohort, we identified an association between a novel single nucleotide polymorphism in the CYP2C cluster on chromosome 10 (rs12777823) and warfarin dose requirement that reached genome-wide significance (p=1·51×10(-8)). This association was confirmed in the replication cohort (p=5·04×10(-5)); analysis of the two cohorts together produced a p value of 4·5×10(-12). Individuals heterozygous for the rs12777823 A allele need a dose reduction of 6·92 mg/week and those homozygous 9·34 mg/week. Regression analysis showed that the inclusion of rs12777823 significantly improves warfarin dose variability explained by the IWPC dosing algorithm (21% relative improvement). INTERPRETATION: A novel CYP2C single nucleotide polymorphism exerts a clinically relevant effect on warfarin dose in African Americans, independent of CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9*3. Incorporation of this variant into pharmacogenetic dosing algorithms could improve warfarin dose prediction in this population. FUNDING: National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Wisconsin Network for Health Research, and the Wellcome Trust.
    The Lancet 06/2013; · 39.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: VKORC1 and CYP2C9 are important contributors to warfarin dose variability, but explain less variability for individuals of African descent than for those of European or Asian descent. We aimed to identify additional variants contributing to warfarin dose requirements in African Americans. METHODS: We did a genome-wide association study of discovery and replication cohorts. Samples from African-American adults (aged ≥18 years) who were taking a stable maintenance dose of warfarin were obtained at International Warfarin Pharmacogenetics Consortium (IWPC) sites and the University of Alabama at Birmingham (Birmingham, AL, USA). Patients enrolled at IWPC sites but who were not used for discovery made up the independent replication cohort. All participants were genotyped. We did a stepwise conditional analysis, conditioning first for VKORC1 -1639G→A, followed by the composite genotype of CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9*3. We prespecified a genome-wide significance threshold of p<5×10(-8) in the discovery cohort and p<0·0038 in the replication cohort. FINDINGS: The discovery cohort contained 533 participants and the replication cohort 432 participants. After the prespecified conditioning in the discovery cohort, we identified an association between a novel single nucleotide polymorphism in the CYP2C cluster on chromosome 10 (rs12777823) and warfarin dose requirement that reached genome-wide significance (p=1·51×10(-8)). This association was confirmed in the replication cohort (p=5·04×10(-5)); analysis of the two cohorts together produced a p value of 4·5×10(-12). Individuals heterozygous for the rs12777823 A allele need a dose reduction of 6·92 mg/week and those homozygous 9·34 mg/week. Regression analysis showed that the inclusion of rs12777823 significantly improves warfarin dose variability explained by the IWPC dosing algorithm (21% relative improvement). INTERPRETATION: A novel CYP2C single nucleotide polymorphism exerts a clinically relevant effect on warfarin dose in African Americans, independent of CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9*3. Incorporation of this variant into pharmacogenetic dosing algorithms could improve warfarin dose prediction in this population.
    The Lancet 06/2013; · 39.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Regulation of key proteins by microRNAs (miRNAs) is an emergent field in biomedicine. Vitamin K 2,3-epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1) is a relevant molecule for cardiovascular diseases, since it is the target of oral anticoagulant drugs and plays a role in soft tissue calcification. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of miRNAs on the expression of VKORC1. Potential miRNAs targeting VKORC1 mRNA were searched using on-line algorithms. Validation studies were carried out in HepG2 cells using miRNA precursors; direct miRNA interaction was investigated with reporter assays.In silico studies identified two putative conserved binding sites for miR-133a and miR-137 on VKORC1 mRNA. Ex vivo studies showed that only miR-133a was expressed in liver; transfection of miRNA precursors of miR-133a in HepG2 cells reduced VKORC1 mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner as assessed by qRT-PCR as well as protein expression. Reporter assays in HEK293T cells showed that miR-133a interacts with the 3'UTR of VKORC1. Additionally, miR-133a levels correlated inversely with VKORC1 mRNA levels in 23 liver samples from healthy subjects.In conclusion, miR-133a appears to have a direct regulatory effect on expression of VKORC1 in humans; this regulation may have potential importance for anticoagulant therapy or aortic calcification.
    Molecular Medicine 11/2012; · 4.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Regulation of key proteins by microRNAs (miRNAs) is an emergent field in biomedicine. Vitamin K 2,3-epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1) is a relevant molecule for cardiovascular diseases, since it is the target of oral anticoagulant drugs and plays a role in soft tissue calcification. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of miRNAs on the expression of VKORC1. Potential miRNAs targeting VKORC1 mRNA were searched by using online algorithms. Validation studies were carried out in HepG2 cells by using miRNA precursors; direct miRNA interaction was investigated with reporter assays. In silico studies identified two putative conserved binding sites for miR-133a and miR-137 on VKORC1 mRNA. Ex vivo studies showed that only miR-133a was expressed in liver; transfection of miRNA precursors of miR-133a in HepG2 cells reduced VKORC1 mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner, as assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) as well as protein expression. Reporter assays in HEK293T cells showed that miR-133a interacts with the 3'UTR of VKORC1. Additionally, miR-133a levels correlated inversely with VKORC1 mRNA levels in 23 liver samples from healthy subjects. In conclusion, miR-133a appears to have a direct regulatory effect on expression of VKORC1 in humans; this regulation may have potential importance for anticoagulant therapy or aortic calcification.
    Mol Med. 01/2012; 18:1466-72.
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    ABSTRACT: Carbamazepine causes various forms of hypersensitivity reactions, ranging from maculopapular exanthema to severe blistering reactions. The HLA-B*1502 allele has been shown to be strongly correlated with carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS-TEN) in the Han Chinese and other Asian populations but not in European populations. We performed a genomewide association study of samples obtained from 22 subjects with carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity syndrome, 43 subjects with carbamazepine-induced maculopapular exanthema, and 3987 control subjects, all of European descent. We tested for an association between disease and HLA alleles through proxy single-nucleotide polymorphisms and imputation, confirming associations by high-resolution sequence-based HLA typing. We replicated the associations in samples from 145 subjects with carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity reactions. The HLA-A*3101 allele, which has a prevalence of 2 to 5% in Northern European populations, was significantly associated with the hypersensitivity syndrome (P=3.5×10(-8)). An independent genomewide association study of samples from subjects with maculopapular exanthema also showed an association with the HLA-A*3101 allele (P=1.1×10(-6)). Follow-up genotyping confirmed the variant as a risk factor for the hypersensitivity syndrome (odds ratio, 12.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.27 to 121.03), maculopapular exanthema (odds ratio, 8.33; 95% CI, 3.59 to 19.36), and SJS-TEN (odds ratio, 25.93; 95% CI, 4.93 to 116.18). The presence of the HLA-A*3101 allele was associated with carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity reactions among subjects of Northern European ancestry. The presence of the allele increased the risk from 5.0% to 26.0%, whereas its absence reduced the risk from 5.0% to 3.8%. (Funded by the U.K. Department of Health and others.).
    New England Journal of Medicine 03/2011; 364(12):1134-43. · 51.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) whose sample size (1,053 Swedish subjects) is sufficiently powered to detect genome-wide significance (p<1.5 x 10(-7)) for polymorphisms that modestly alter therapeutic warfarin dose. The anticoagulant drug warfarin is widely prescribed for reducing the risk of stroke, thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and coronary malfunction. However, Caucasians vary widely (20-fold) in the dose needed for therapeutic anticoagulation, and hence prescribed doses may be too low (risking serious illness) or too high (risking severe bleeding). Prior work established that approximately 30% of the dose variance is explained by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the warfarin drug target VKORC1 and another approximately 12% by two non-synonymous SNPs (*2, *3) in the cytochrome P450 warfarin-metabolizing gene CYP2C9. We initially tested each of 325,997 GWAS SNPs for association with warfarin dose by univariate regression and found the strongest statistical signals (p<10(-78)) at SNPs clustering near VKORC1 and the second lowest p-values (p<10(-31)) emanating from CYP2C9. No other SNPs approached genome-wide significance. To enhance detection of weaker effects, we conducted multiple regression adjusting for known influences on warfarin dose (VKORC1, CYP2C9, age, gender) and identified a single SNP (rs2108622) with genome-wide significance (p = 8.3 x 10(-10)) that alters protein coding of the CYP4F2 gene. We confirmed this result in 588 additional Swedish patients (p<0.0029) and, during our investigation, a second group provided independent confirmation from a scan of warfarin-metabolizing genes. We also thoroughly investigated copy number variations, haplotypes, and imputed SNPs, but found no additional highly significant warfarin associations. We present power analysis of our GWAS that is generalizable to other studies, and conclude we had 80% power to detect genome-wide significance for common causative variants or markers explaining at least 1.5% of dose variance. These GWAS results provide further impetus for conducting large-scale trials assessing patient benefit from genotype-based forecasting of warfarin dose.
    PLoS Genetics 03/2009; 5(3):e1000433. · 8.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Many genome-wide association studies focus on associating single loci with target phenotypes. However, in the setting of rare variation, accumulating sufficient samples to assess these associations can be difficult. Moreover, multiple variations in a gene or a set of genes within a pathway may all contribute to the phenotype, suggesting that the aggregation of variations found over the gene or pathway may be useful for improving the power to detect associations. Results Here, we present a method for aggregating single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) along biologically relevant pathways in order to seek genetic associations with phenotypes. Our method uses all available genetic variants and does not remove those in linkage disequilibrium (LD). Instead, it uses a novel SNP weighting scheme to down-weight the contributions of correlated SNPs. We apply our method to three cohorts of patients taking warfarin: two European descent cohorts and an African American cohort. Although the clinical covariates and key pharmacogenetic loci for warfarin have been characterized, our association metric identifies a significant association with mutations distributed throughout the pathway of warfarin metabolism. We improve dose prediction after using all known clinical covariates and pharmacogenetic variants in VKORC1 and CYP2C9. In particular, we find that at least 1% of the missing heritability in warfarin dose may be due to the aggregated effects of variations in the warfarin metabolic pathway, even though the SNPs do not individually show a significant association. Conclusions Our method allows researchers to study aggregative SNP effects in an unbiased manner by not preselecting SNPs. It retains all the available information by accounting for LD-structure through weighting, which eliminates the need for LD pruning.
    BMC Genomics 14(3). · 4.40 Impact Factor