S O'Sullivan

Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Stockholm, Sweden

Are you S O'Sullivan?

Claim your profile

Publications (9)45.39 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Some patients with severe asthma cannot be controlled with high doses of inhaled steroids (ICS), which may be related to ongoing environmental allergen exposure. We investigated whether 10 weeks of high altitude allergen avoidance leads to sustained benefits regarding clinical and inflammatory markers of disease control in adolescents with persistent asthma despite treatment with high dose ICS. Eighteen atopic asthmatic adolescents (12-18 yr, 500-2000 microg ICS daily) with established house dust mite allergy, participated in a parallel-group study. Quality of life (PAQL), lung function, bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) to adenosine and histamine, induced sputum and urine samples were collected repeatedly from 10 patients during a 10-week admission period to the Swiss Alps (alt. 1560 m) and at 6 weeks after return to sea level. Results were compared with those in eight patients, studied in their home environment at sea level for a similar time period. Throughout the study, asthma medication remained unchanged in both groups. During admission to high altitude, PAQL, lung function, BHR to adenosine and histamine, and urinary levels of eosinophil protein X (U-EPX), leukotriene E4 (U-LTE4) and 9alpha11beta prostaglandin F2 (U-9alpha11beta PGF2) improved significantly (P < 0.05), with a similar tendency for sputum eosinophils (P < 0.07). Furthermore, the changes in PAQL and BHR to adenosine and histamine were greater in the altitude than in the control group (P < 0.05). At 6 weeks after renewed allergen exposure at sea level, the improvements in PAQL (P < 0.05), BHR to adenosine (P < 0.07) and histamine (P < 0.05), as well as U-EPX (P < 0.05) and U-LTE4 (P < 0.05) were maintained. A short period of high altitude allergen avoidance, on top of regular treatment with ICS and long-acting beta2-agonists, results in improvement of asthma, as assessed by clinical and inflammatory markers of disease severity. These findings indicate that short-term, rigorous allergen avoidance can improve the long-term control of severe asthma over and above what can be achieved even by high doses of inhaled steroids.
    Clinical & Experimental Allergy 03/2001; 31(3):400-8. · 4.79 Impact Factor
  • S O'Sullivan, M Kumlin
    Clinical & Experimental Allergy 12/1999; 29(11):1454-6. · 4.79 Impact Factor
  • S O'Sullivan, M J Mueller, S E Dahlén, M Kumlin
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Measurements of the prostaglandin (PGD2) metabolite 9 alpha, 11 beta-PGF2 in unextracted urine performed by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) were compared with values obtained by negative chemical ionisation gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (NCI GC-MS). Values determined by NCI GC-MS were in the same range but consistently lower than those obtained by EIA, suggesting that other endogenous compounds could be contributing to the immunoreactivity. Isoprostanes were generated by autoxidation of arachidonic acid and the 9 alpha, 11 beta-PGF2 antibody demonstrated less than 0.7% crossreactivity to the mix, making it unlikely that isoprostanes in urine interfere with quantification of 9 alpha, 11 beta-PGF2 by EIA. This was further supported by the 70% reduction in immunoreactive material measured in urine after three days treatment in a healthy volunteer with the cyclooxygenase inhibitor ibuprofen. Purification of urine samples by reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) revealed the presence of two immunoreactive compounds in addition to 9 alpha, 11 beta-PGF2. The compounds were identified as dinor compounds by NCI GC-MS. One of the compounds was identical to 9 alpha, 11 beta-2,3-dinor-PGF2 which was generated by beta-oxidation of 9 alpha, 11 beta-PGF2 and identified by electron impact (EI)-GC-MS. In conclusion, urinary 9 alpha, 11 beta-PGF2 concentrations measured by EIA represent the sum of 9 alpha, 11 beta-PGF2 and two isomers of its dinor metabolite. Thus, the direct EIA is fast, sensitive and sufficiently specific to monitor activation of the PGD2 pathway, thereby providing a valuable clinical tool to assess the status of mast cell activation in vivo.
    Prostaglandins & other lipid mediators 06/1999; 57(2-3):149-65. · 2.42 Impact Factor
  • S O'Sullivan
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) is the major cyclooxygenase metabolite of arachidonic acid released after stimulation of mast cells. Quantification of metabolites of PGD2 can be used as an objective indices of PGD2 production and hence mast cell activation in vivo. The aim of this thesis was to investigate the feasibility of measuring the primary urinary metabolite of PGD2, 9 alpha,11 beta-PGF2 with enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Measurements of 9 alpha,11 beta-PGF2 in urine made by EIA were compared with values obtained by negative ion chemical ionisation gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (NCI GC-MS), the gold standard method. Levels of 9 alpha,11 beta-PGF2, in urine samples measured by NCI GC-MS were consistently lower than those obtained by EIA. NCI GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of two additional dinor compounds, shorter metabolites of 9 alpha,11 beta-PGF2 in the urine. One of the compounds was identical to 9 alpha,11 beta-2,3-dinor-PGF2 which was generated by beta-oxidation of 9 alpha,11 beta-PGF2 and identified by electron impact (EI GC-MS). Thus, urinary 9 alpha,11 beta-PGF2 concentrations measured by EIA represent the sum of three PGD2 metabolites. For convenience sake, the metabolites are collectively referred to as 9 alpha,11 beta-PGF2 in the subsequent studies. A 3-fold increase in the urinary excretion of 9 alpha,11 beta-PGF2 was documented after allergen-induced bronchoconstriction in nine atopic asthmatics. This challenge was considered a positive control since it is unambiguous that mast cell activation occurs during the early phase of allergen-induced airway obstruction. Histamine-induced bronchoconstriction did not result in an increase in the levels of 9 alpha,11 beta-PGF2 demonstrating that PGD2 was not formed as a consequence of the bronchoconstriction per se. Moreover, bronchial challenge with lysine-aspirin in eight aspirin-intolerant asthmatics elicited bronchoconstriction and was accompanied by a significant increase in the urinary excretion of 9 alpha,11 beta-PGF2. Challenge with a higher dose of aspirin produced an even greater increase in 9 alpha,11 beta-PGF2 levels, indicating a dose-dependent release of PGD2 during aspirin-induced bronchoconstriction. The pattern of mediator release during the early (EAR) and late asthmatic response (LAR) to allergen was investigated by subjecting twelve mild atopic asthmatics to allergen challenge. Within one hour of the maximal bronchoconstrictor response, there was a significant increase in the urinary concentrations of the mast cell markers, 9 alpha,11 beta-PGF2 and N tau-methylhistamine, urinary metabolite of histamine, and the end product of the cysteinyl-leukotrienes, leukotriene (LT)E4. Levels of all three mediators were also significantly elevated above baseline during the LAR. Urinary levels of eosinophil protein X (EPX), a marker of eosinophil activation, remained unaltered during both the EAR and LAR. Preliminary evidence suggests a diurnal variation in the urinary excretion of EPX. Increased airway fluid osmolarity in the lower airways as a result of exercise, has been suggested to trigger mast cell activation and subsequent bronchoconstriction in a subset of asthmatics. Twelve subjects with a history of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), exercised on a stationary bicycle ergometer for 5 minutes. Seven of the subjects (responders) experienced bronchoconstriction, whereas, the pulmonary function of the remaining five subjects (non-responders) remained stable. The urinary excretion of 9 alpha,11 beta-PGF2 in the responder group increased significantly compared to the non-responders at 30 and 90 minutes after exercise. The urinary excretion of LTE4 and N tau-methylhistamine was not significantly different between the two groups at either time point after exercise, although there was a tendency for elevated levels of N tau-methylhistamine in the responder group. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)
    Acta physiologica Scandinavica. Supplementum 05/1999; 644:1-74.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: It is generally accepted that the early asthmatic response to inhaled allergen is a result of IgE-mediated mast cell activation. In contrast, the underlying mechanism of the late asthmatic response is much less clear. In order to investigate the pattern of mediator release during the early and late asthmatic responses to allergen, measurements of the urinary excretion of the mast cell markers 9alpha,11beta-PGF2 and Ntau-methylhistamine were made. In addition, urinary levels of eosinophil protein X (EPX) and leukotriene E4 (LTE4) were measured. Twelve mild atopic asthmatics participated in the study. On the study day, pulmonary function was recorded at baseline and for 12 h after inhalation of allergen. Urine was collected prior to challenge and thereafter at 1 h intervals. Measurements of 9alpha, 11beta-PGF2 and LTE4 were made with enzyme-immunoassay, and levels of Ntau-methylhistamine and EPX were analysed with radioimmunoassay. All subjects developed both an early and late phase airway response. Within 1 h of the early peak airway response, there was a significant increase in the urinary concentrations (AUC/h) of 9alpha, 11beta-PGF2 (49.3 +/- 9.2 to 142.5 +/- 49.2; P < 0.001) Ntau-methylhistamine (10.4 +/- 1.4 to 19.5 +/- 1.4; P < 0.001) and LTE4 (43.7 +/- 5.9 to 105.9 +/- 21.3; P < 0.001). Levels of all three mediators were also significantly increased above baseline during the LAR to 79.4 +/- 9.5 (P < 0.01), 19.8 +/- 1.9 (P < 0.001) and 85.6 +/- 10.4 (P < 0.001), respectively. Levels of EPX remained unchanged during the early and late responses (39.2 +/- 10.2 to 37.5 +/- 18.5, 33.9 +/- 6.8). These results indicate that mast cell activation is a feature not only of the early but also the late asthmatic response. Finally, increased LTE4 supports the contribution of the leukotrienes to airway obstruction during both phases of the asthmatic response to allergen.
    Clinical & Experimental Allergy 12/1998; 28(11):1332-9. · 4.79 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Acute exposure of healthy subjects to swine house dust causes increased bronchial responsiveness to methacholine but no acute bronchoconstriction. The role of cysteinyl leukotrienes and mast cells in increased bronchial responsiveness is unclear. Ten non-asthmatic subjects were exposed to swine dust for three hours while weighing pigs in a piggery. Urine was collected prior to and for up to 12 hours after entering the piggery and at the same times five days before and the day after exposure. As indices of whole body leukotriene production and mast cell activation, urinary levels of leukotriene E4 (LTE4) and 9 alpha, 11 beta-PGF2, the earliest appearing urinary metabolite of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), were measured. Bronchial responsiveness to methacholine was determined five days before and the day after the exposure. Methacholine PD20FEV1 decreased from 1.32 mg (95% CI 0.22 to 10.25) before exposure to 0.38 mg (95% CI 0.11 to 1.3) after exposure (p < 0.01). Associated with the increase in bronchial responsiveness there was a significant mean difference between post- and prechallenge levels of LTE4 (difference 38.5 ng/mmol creatinine (95% CI 17.2 to 59.8); p < 0.01) and 9 alpha, 11 beta-PGF2 (difference 69 ng/mmol creatinine (95% CI 3.7 to 134.3); p < 0.05) on the day of exposure to swine dust. Swine dust exposure induced a 24-fold increase in the total cell number and a 12-fold increase in IL-8 levels in the nasal lavage fluid. The levels of LTB4 and LTE4 in nasal lavage fluid following exposure also increased 5.5-fold and 2-fold, respectively. The findings of this study indicate that cysteinyl leukotrienes and other mast cell mediators contribute to the development of increased bronchial responsiveness following inhalation of organic swine dust.
    Thorax 12/1998; 53(12):1041-6. · 8.38 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Controversy remains about the causative mediators in the bronchoconstrictive response to exercise in asthma. This study examined whether mast cell activation is a feature of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction by measuring urinary metabolites of mast cell mediators. Twelve nonsmoking subjects with mild asthma and a history of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction exercised on a stationary bicycle ergometer for 5 min at 80% maximum work load. Pulmonary function was monitored and urine was collected before and 30 and 90 min after the provocation. The urinary concentrations of the mast cell markers 9alpha,11beta-prostaglandin (PG)F2 and Ntau-methylhistamine, as well as leukotriene E4 (LTE4) were determined by immunoassay. Seven of the 12 subjects (responders) experienced bronchoconstriction (>15% fall in the forced expiratory volume in one second) following exercise, whereas the pulmonary function of the remaining five subjects (nonresponders) remained stable. The urinary excretion (mean+/-SE) of 9alpha,11beta-PGF2 in the responders increased significantly compared with the nonresponders at 30 (77.1+/-14.4 versus 37.2+/-5.6; p<0.05) and 90 min (79.3+/-8.6 versus 40.4+/-8.5, p<0.05) after exercise challenge. The urinary excretion of Ntau-methylhistamine and LTE4 was not significantly different between the two groups at 30 or 90 min after exercise. The findings represent the first documentation of increased urinary levels of 9alpha,11beta-prostaglandin F2 in adults following exercise challenge and provides clear evidence for mast cell activation during exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in asthmatics.
    European Respiratory Journal 09/1998; 12(2):345-50. · 6.36 Impact Factor
  • Advances in experimental medicine and biology 02/1997; 433:159-62. · 1.83 Impact Factor
  • S O'Sullivan, B Dahlén, S E Dahlén, M Kumlin
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Prostaglandin (PG)D2 is a major product of arachidonic acid metabolism in pulmonary mast cells. We therefore attempted to determine whether measurement of the stable urinary metabolite of PGD2, 9 alpha, 11 beta-PGF2, could serve as a marker of mast cell activation in the lungs. A commercially available enzyme immunoassay was validated and found to be specific and sensitive when applied to unpurified urine. There was no diurnal variation in the levels of 9 alpha, 11 beta-PGF2 in healthy volunteers. Morning baseline values of urinary 9 alpha, 11 beta-PGF2 were measured in three groups--healthy volunteers (n = 9), patients with atopic asthma (n = 14), and aspirin-intolerant patients with asthma (n = 12)--and found to be very similar, 54 +/- 9, 62 +/- 6, and 71 +/- 15 ng/mmol creatinine, respectively (means +/- SEM). Urinary excretion of 9 alpha, 11 beta-PGF2 was increased threefold immediately after allergen-induced bronchoconstriction in nine patients with atopic asthma. Bronchial challenge with inhaled lysine aspirin in eight aspirin-intolerant patients with asthma produced bronchoconstriction without extrapulmonary symptoms and was also followed by a significant increase in the urinary excretion of 9 alpha, 11 beta-PGF2. In addition, challenge with a higher dose of aspirin produced an even greater increase in urinary 9 alpha, 11 beta-PGF2, supporting dose-dependent release of PGD2 during aspirin-induced bronchoconstriction. In contrast, the postchallenge levels of urinary 9 alpha, 11 beta-PGF2 were not increased when bronchoconstriction was induced by histamine challenge in the aspirin-intolerant patients with asthma. The study confirms mast cell involvement in allergen-induced bronchoconstriction and provides novel data, which strongly support the hypothesis that pulmonary mast cells are activated during aspirin-induced airway obstruction. It is finally suggested that measurement of urinary 9 alpha, 11 beta-PGF2 with enzyme immunoassay may be used as a new noninvasive strategy to monitor mast cell activation in vivo.
    Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology 09/1996; 98(2):421-32. · 12.05 Impact Factor