Raffaella Pinzani

Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda - Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano, Lombardy, Italy

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Publications (6)10.95 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: There are few prospective evaluations of point-of-care ultrasonography (US) for the diagnosis of pediatric community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). In particular, there are very few data concerning the efficiency of US in comparison with that of chest radiography (CR) in defining different kinds of lung alterations in the various pulmonary sections. The aim of this study was to bridge this gap in order to increase our knowledge of the performance of US in diagnosing CAP in childhood. A total of 103 children (56 males, 54.4%; mean age +/- standard deviation 5.6 +/- 4.6 years) admitted to hospital with a clinical diagnosis of suspected CAP were prospectively enrolled and underwent CR (evaluated by an independent expert radiologist) and lung US (performed by a resident in paediatrics with limited experience in US). The performance of US in diagnosing CAP (i.e. its sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values) was compared with that of CR. A total of 48 patients had radiographically confirmed CAP. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of US in comparison with CR were respectively 97.9%, 94.5%, 94.0% and 98.1%. US identified a significantly higher number of cases of pleural effusion, but the concordance of the two methods in identifying the type of CAP was poor. US can be considered a useful means of diagnosing CAP in children admitted to an Emergency Department with a lower respiratory tract infection, although its usefulness in identifying the type of lung involvement requires further evaluation.
    Italian Journal of Pediatrics 04/2014; 40(1):37. · 1.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The development of neurological complications due to varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation is relatively uncommon, particularly in the case of immunocompetent patients. Only a few cases have been described in the literature, most of which involved adult or elderly patients.Clinical presentation: Two days after his pediatrician had diagnosed herpes zoster and prescribed oral acyclovir 400 mg three times a day, a 14-year-old boy was admitted to our hospital because of mild fever, severe headache, slowness, drowsiness and vomiting. A cerebrospinal fluid examination was performed and showed an increased protein concentration (95 mg/dL), normal glucose level (48 mg/dL; blood glucose level, 76 mg/dL) and lymphocytic pleocytosis (1,400 lymphocytes/muL), and VZV DNA was detected by means of polymerase chain reaction (1,250 copies/mL). The results of immunological screening for HIV, lymphocyte subpopulation counts, serum immunoglobulin and complement (C3 and C4) levels, vaccine responsiveness and lymphocytes stimulation tests were unremarkable. Acyclovir was administered intravenously at a dose of 10 mg/kg three times a day and continued for 10 days. The therapy was highly effective and the patient's clinical condition rapidly improved: fever disappeared after two days, and all of the signs and symptoms of neurological involvement after four days. The skin lesions resolved in about one week, and no pain or dysesthesia was ever reported. Given the favourable evolution of the illness, the child was discharged without further therapy after the 10-day treatment. The findings of a magnetic resonance examination immediately after the discontinuation of the antiviral therapy were normal, and a control examination carried out about four weeks later did not find any sign or symptom of disease. VZV reactivation can also lead to various neurological complications in immunocompetent children. Prompt therapy with acyclovir and the integrity of the immune system are important in conditioning outcome, but other currently unknown factors probably also play a role.
    Italian Journal of Pediatrics 11/2013; 39(1):72. · 1.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Despite the availability of effective antibacterial agents and vaccines, pneumococcal meningitis and sepsis are still associated with high mortality rates and a high risk of neurological sequelae. We describe the case of a 17-month-old boy vaccinated with heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) who developed bacterial meningitis complicated by subdural empyema and deafness caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 7F. The 7F strain is not contained in PCV7 (the only vaccine on the market at the time of the onset of meningitis) but is included in the new pediatric 13-valent PCV, which may therefore prevent cases such as this in the future.
    Journal of preventive medicine and hygiene 06/2012; 53(2):98-100.
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    ABSTRACT: In order to evaluate the use of an algorithm based on a procalcitonin (PCT) cut-off value as a means of guiding antibiotic therapy, 319 hospitalised children with uncomplicated community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) were randomised 1:1 to be treated on the basis of the algorithm or in accordance with standard guidelines. The children in the PCT group did not receive antibiotics if their PCT level upon admission was <0.25 ng/mL, and those receiving antibiotics from the time of admission were treated until their PCT level was ≥ 0.25 ng/mL. The final analysis was based on 155 patients in the PCT group and 155 in the control group. In comparison with the controls, the PCT group received significantly fewer antibiotic prescriptions (85.8% vs 100%; p < 0.05), were exposed to antibiotics for a shorter time (5.37 vs 10.96 days; p < 0.05), and experienced fewer antibiotic-related adverse events (3.9% vs 25.2%; p < 0.05), regardless of CAP severity. There was no significant between-group difference in recurrence of respiratory symptoms and new antibiotic prescription in the month following enrollment. The results of this first prospective study using a PCT cut-off value to guide antibiotic therapy for pediatric CAP showed that this approach can significantly reduce antibiotic use and antibiotic-related adverse events in children with uncomplicated disease. However, because the study included mainly children with mild to moderate CAP and the risk of the use of the algorithm-based approach was not validated in a relevant number of severe cases, further studies are needed before it can be used in routine clinical practice.
    Respiratory medicine 09/2011; 105(12):1939-45. · 2.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In order to evaluate the immunogenicity and the effect of a virosomal influenza vaccine on viral replication and T-cell activation in HIV-infected children receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), 29 children infected with HIV-1 vertically (19 primed with a previous influenza vaccination and 10 who were not been immunized against influenza) were immunized with an intramuscular virosome-adjuvanted influenza vaccine. According to the European Agency for Evaluation of Medical Products (EMEA) criteria, the immunogenicity of the vaccine was adequate against all three influenza strains (A H1N1, A H3N2, and B) in the primed children, and against A H1N1 and A H3N2 in the unprimed children. After in vitro stimulation with vaccine antigens, the IFN-gamma levels in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells cultures increased significantly from a baseline level of 103.0 +/- 229.8 pg/ml to a 30-day level of 390.7 +/- 606.3 pg/ml (P < 0.05), with concentrations significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the primed children than in the unprimed children. No increase in plasma HIV-1 RNA or HIV-1 proviral DNA was observed in either subgroup, and the immunophenotype analyses demonstrated that the CD4+ cell counts and percentages, the CD4/CD8 ratio and activated lymphocytes remained stable in either group from baseline to 1 month after each vaccine dose. This study showed that the virosomal influenza vaccine does seem to be immunogenic in the majority of HIV-infected children receiving HAART and does not induce viral replication or T-cell activation. Given the possible influenza-related complications in children infected with HIV, these results support the use of this influenza vaccine in such patients.
    Journal of Medical Virology 04/2006; 78(4):440-5. · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on cardiovascular involvement was evaluated in 38 vertically human immunodeficiency virus-infected children followed up for 5 years. This study demonstrates for the first time in a cohort of children the resolution of previous dilated cardiomyopathy after the start of HAART and the absence of cardiovascular events related to metabolic abnormalities during the period of its administration.
    The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal 07/2004; 23(6):559-63. · 3.57 Impact Factor