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Publications (11)36.71 Total impact

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    01/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the collection, standardisation and checking of cancer survival data included in the EUROCARE-4 database. Methods for estimating relative survival are also described. Incidence and vital status data on newly diagnosed European cancer cases were received from 93 cancer registries in 23 countries, covering 151,400,000 people (35% of the participating country population). The third revision of the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology was used to specify tumour topography and morphology. Records were extensively checked for consistency and compatibility using multiple routines; flagged records were sent back for correction. An algorithm assigned standardised sequence numbers to multiple cancers. Only first malignant cancers were used to estimate relative survival from registry, year, sex and age-specific life tables. Age-adjusted and Europe-wide survival were also estimated. The database contains 13,814,573 cases diagnosed in 1978-2002; 92% malignant. A negligible proportion of records was excluded for major errors. Of 5,753,934 malignant adult cases diagnosed in 1995-2002, 5.3% were second or later cancers, 2.7% were known from death certificates only and 0.4% were discovered at autopsy. The remaining 5,278,670 cases entered the survival analyses, 90% of these had microscopic confirmation and 1.3% were censored alive after less than five years' follow-up. These indicators suggest satisfactory data quality that has improved since EUROCARE-3.
    European journal of cancer (Oxford, England: 1990) 02/2009; 45(6):909-30. · 4.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Since the issue of the first regulations concerning the remediation of contaminated sites, the Istituto Superiore di Sanità, on the basis of specific requests, has drawn up various technical opinions regarding the proposed reference values (quality standards) for soils and underground waters, to be achieved when remediating contaminated sites, for substances for which no standard limit values did not exist at that time. These reference values, widely used throughout the country and accepted and adopted as "remediation aim" values by various territorial bodies responsible for the approval and monitoring of remediation projects, have been collected in a specific reclamation oriented data bank known as the "Banca Dati Bonifiche (BDB)" (Reclamation Data Bank). The BDB contains the related standardized "rationale" for each reference value, in order to serve as a useful reference for the national bodies concerned with the remediation of contaminated sites.
    Annali dell'Istituto superiore di sanita 02/2008; 44(1):75-80. · 0.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Data Bank on Carcinogens (Banca Dati Cancerogeni, BDC) is a factual data bank, available on the Istituto Superiore di Sanità website, aimed at supporting the risk management decision making of central and local administrators. It can also represent a valuable tool for industry. The available information on carcinogenicity evaluations/classifications produced by European Union and by other institutions (IARC, USEPA, NTP, CCTN) is presented in a concise form accompanied by bibliographic references enabling the users to consult the original sources and, in some cases, to be directly connected to the relevant website. The classifications carried out by each organization in accordance with its own criteria assign the examined agents to specific qualitative categories and do not include quantitative assessment. BDC intends to provide an easy tool for experts, researchers and risk managers dealing with carcinogenic agents.
    Annali dell'Istituto superiore di sanita 02/2008; 44(1):31-42. · 0.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Istituto Superiore Sanità has developed a data bank on sensitizing substances (Banca Dati Sensibilizzanti, BDS), available on website (www.iss.it/bdse/), sharing complete, controlled and updated information coming from different sources, such as scientific publications, international agencies and governmental or non governmental organizations. It is worthwhile that the main objective of the BDS is not the classification of sensitizing or potentially sensitizing agents within specific risk classes, but it is essentially to provide concise and non confidential information related to this endpoint. At present, the BDS includes: all the substances officially classified by European Union, (Annex I to Directive 67/548/EEC), some substances listed in I (Directive 67/548/EEC) for endpoints different than "sensitization" but indicated as sensitizers by other relevant institutions, all the substances indicated as sensitizers by relevant agencies or institutions (ACGIH, DFG), some substances indicted as sensitizers by industry and other non-governmental organizations (ETAD and HERA), all the substances regarded as "potentially sensitizing dyes" by the Commission of the European Community for the award of the eco-label to textile products, some substances for which, even in the absence of any categorization by Union, ACGIH or DFG, it is not possible to exclude a sensitizing potential on the basis of reliable documents.
    Annali dell'Istituto superiore di sanita 02/2008; 44(1):64-74. · 0.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Between 1 February and 31 March 2006, the Poison Control Centers (PPC) active in Lombardy collaborated with an integrated surveillance system carried out in Piedmont during the Olympic Games 2006. The collaborating PPC notified to the system 697 human cases of exposure occurred in Piedmont during the observation period. Among these cases, 70% were exposed accidentally, 40% were 6 years old or younger, and 45% reported at least a clinical effect. The agents more frequently reported were: cleaning substances (household) (110 cases), fumes/gases/vapors (63 cases, comprising 38 cases accidentally exposed to carbon monoxide), and sedative/hypnotics/antipsychotics (53 cases). Although very limited, the available observations focused the attention on specific hazards and were able to highlight the potential of a toxic exposure surveillance system based on the information reported by the Italian PPC.
    Annali dell'Istituto superiore di sanita 02/2007; 43(3):287-94. · 0.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The EUROCARE-3 CD-ROM has been developed to provide more detailed data with respect to those published in the monograph. The CD-ROM provides estimates of age-specific and age-standardised survival figures, cumulative and interval-specific survival, observed and relative survival for 47 cancer sites or combinations of sites, based on >4 million adult cancer patients diagnosed from 1983 to 1994 and reported from 56 European cancer registries. In addition, the CD-ROM provides observed survival proportions for 25 childhood cancer entities based on 23,000 young patients diagnosed from 1990 to 1994. Survival indicators, corresponding standard errors and confidence intervals can be selected according to cancer site, registry or country, sex, age class and disease duration. Basic graphical display and export facilities have also been provided. As an example of how to use this CD-ROM, this paper will report a descriptive analysis of relative survival patterns for all cancers combined, by age, sex and country. The EUROCARE-3 CD-ROM can be ordered free of charge or directly downloaded at http://www.eurocare.it.
    Annals of Oncology 02/2003; 14 Suppl 5:v150-5. · 7.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: EUROCARE-3 collected data from 45 population-based cancer registries in 20 countries on 24 620 European children aged from 0 to 14 years diagnosed with malignancy in the period 1990-1994. Five-year survival between countries was compared for all malignancies and for the major diagnostic categories, adjusting for age, and estimated average European survival weighting for differences in childhood populations. For all cancers combined, survival variation was large (45% in Estonia to 90% in Iceland), and was generally low (60-70%) in eastern Europe and high (> or =75%) in Switzerland, Germany and the Nordic countries (except Denmark). The Nordic countries had the highest survival for four of the seven major tumour types: nephroblastoma (92%), acute lymphoid leukaemia (85%), CNS tumours (73%) and acute non-lymphocytic leukaemia (62%). The eastern countries had lowest survival: 89% for Hodgkin's disease, 71% for nephroblastoma, 68% for acute lymphoid leukaemia, 61% for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, 57% for central nervous system (CNS) tumours and 29% for acute non-lymphocytic leukaemia. The Nordic countries represent a survival gold standard to which other countries can aspire. Since most childhood cancers respond well to treatment, survival differences are attributable to differences in access (including referral and timely diagnosis) and use of modern treatments; however, the obstacles to access and application of standard treatments probably vary markedly with country.
    Annals of Oncology 02/2003; 14 Suppl 5:v119-27. · 7.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The EUROCARE database contains data on 6.5 million cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 1994 in populations covered by 67 cancer registries in 22 European countries. The quality-checked entries specify age, sex, diagnosis date, cancer site, morphology, microscopic confirmation and vital status, as well as containing broad indicators of stage. For EUROCARE-3, which refers to diagnoses from 1990 to 1994, 3389 cases with major data problems and 142,525 second or subsequent cancers were removed, leaving more than 2 million cases for analysis. From these data, observed and relative survival for each cancer site and country were calculated at 1, 3 and 5 years from diagnosis. Overall European survival for each cancer site and for all cancers combined were calculated combining country-specific survival figures. Overall, 1.1% of cases were lost to follow-up, 4.2% were known from death certificates only and 1.2% were known at autopsy only. The percentage of microscopically confirmed cases varied with cancer site and country, and was always higher in northern European countries. Comparison of quality indicators for the EUROCARE-3 database with earlier EUROCARE databases indicates that data quality and standardisation have improved.
    Annals of Oncology 02/2003; 14 Suppl 5:v14-27. · 7.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: EUROCARE-3 analysed the survival of 1815584 adult cancer patients diagnosed from 1990 to 1994 in 22 European countries. The results are reported in tables, one per cancer site, coded according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9 classification. The main findings of the tables are summarised and commented on in this article. For most solid cancers, wide differences in survival between different European populations were found, as also reported by EUROCARE-1 and EUROCARE-2, despite a remarkable (10%) overall increase in cancer survival from 1985 to 1994. Survival was highest in northern Europe (Sweden, Norway, Finland and Iceland), and fairly good in central-southern Europe (France, Switzerland, Austria and Spain). Survival was particularly low in eastern Europe, low in Denmark and the UK, and fairly low in Portugal and Malta. The mix of tumour stage at diagnosis explains much of the survival differences for cancers of the digestive tract, female reproductive system, breast, thyroid, and also skin melanoma. For tumours of the urinary tract and prostate, the differences were explained mainly by differences in diagnostic criteria and procedures. The case mix by anatomic subsite largely explains differences in survival for head and neck cancers. For oesophagus, pancreas, liver and brain cancer, with poor prognoses, survival differences were limited. Tumours, for which highly effective treatments are available, such as testicular cancer, Hodgkin's lymphoma and some haematological malignancies, had fairly uniform survival across Europe. Survival for all tumours combined (an indicator of the overall cancer care performance of a nation's health system) was better in young than old patients, and better in women than men. The affluence of countries influenced overall cancer survival through the availability of adequate diagnostic and treatment procedures, and screening programmes.
    Annals of Oncology 02/2003; 14 Suppl 5:v61-118. · 7.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An existing database on pesticides, running in the DOS/Windows environment, is operative at the National Institute of Health and has yielded useful informations for several published researches. The database is currently being restructured for the purpose of making it available on the Web. An HTML interface, allowing to formulate queries on the database from the Web is presently under development, and it will be made available, once the problems related to confidentiality of certain parts of the database are solved. The database in its present form is presented and necessary changes foreseen in the Web edition are discussed.
    Studies in health technology and informatics 02/1997; 43 Pt A:30-2.