P J Bion

Lancaster University, Lancaster, ENG, United Kingdom

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Publications (8)37.56 Total impact

  • A W Young, P J Bion
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    ABSTRACT: Two experiments on right hemisphere superiority for upright face recognition by normal adults are reported. Experiment 1 showed that right hemisphere superiority for face recognition is affected by the ratio of stimuli to trials used in the experiment. A low ratio of stimuli to trials (Condition A) gave right hemisphere superiorities for both male and female subjects, whereas a high ratio of stimuli to trials (Condition C) led to no visual hemifield difference for male or for female subjects. The use of a stimuli to trials ratio intermediate between those of Condition A and Condition C resulted in a sex difference, with males but not females showing right hemisphere superiority in Condition B. It is argued that both males and females possess asymmetrically organised face processing mechanisms whose operation is dependent upon the level of difficulty of the face memory task used in a particular experiment, but that there is a sex difference in the range across which these mechanisms can operate. Experiment 2 demonstrated that this sex difference does not simply reflect an underlying sex difference in the tendency to use configurational or piecemeal strategies in such experiments.
    Cortex 07/1983; 19(2):215-26. · 6.04 Impact Factor
  • A W Young, P J Bion, A W Ellis
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    ABSTRACT: Nouns of high imageability and low or high age of reading acquisition were presented bilaterally to adult subjects, who were asked to name them. Order of report of nouns appearing in the LVF and in the RVF was counterbalanced. RVF nouns were more accurately named, regardless of age of reading acquisition. This result is inconsistent with the hypothesis that the right cerebral hemisphere acquires its 'visual vocabulary' during the early stages of learning to read. Despite being matched to high reading age nouns on frequency and imageability, low reading age nouns were more accurately named.
    Cortex 11/1982; 18(3):477-82. · 6.04 Impact Factor
  • A W Young, P J Bion
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    ABSTRACT: Line drawings of common objects were presented bilaterally, with one drawing in each visual hemifield, to right-handed children aged five, seven and eleven years, and to adults, who were required to name them. Left-right or right-left order for report was counterbalanced by means of a cue consisting of underlining the drawing to be reported first. No visual hemifield difference was found for subjects' first reports, and a small right visual hemifield (RVF) superiority was found for subjects' second reports. This visual hemifield X report interaction was unrelated to age. The result is taken to indicate that there is no change in the age range studied in the relative abilities of the left and right cerebral hemispheres to recognise the drawings used, but that at all ages the right hemisphere is less able than the left to effect the temporary storage needed when a drawing is to be reported second.
    Cortex 11/1981; 17(3):459-64. · 6.04 Impact Factor
  • A W Young, P J Bion
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    ABSTRACT: Two experiments investigating asymmetries in the naming of laterally presented known faces are reported. In Experiment I, upright and inverted faces of classmates or colleagues were presented bilaterally and unilaterally to seven-year-old children, eleven-year-old children, and adults. A LVF (left visual hemifield) superiority was found for naming upright faces, unrelated to age. For inverted faces there was no difference between the visual hemifields. In Experiment II faces of famous people were used as stimuli. When adult subjects were given little indication as to which faces to expect (Condition A) there was no difference between the visual hemifields. When they were given a list of the faces to be used (Condition B) a LVF naming superiority was found. The results are interpreted as indicating superiority of the right cerebral hemisphere for a component of the processing of known faces that is of importance when the subject knows which faces he can expect to see.
    Cortex 05/1981; 17(1):97-106. · 6.04 Impact Factor
  • A W Young, P J Bion, A W Ellis
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    ABSTRACT: Experiments requiring the naming of bilaterally presented nouns, picturable nouns, consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) nonwords, and line drawings are reported. In order to eliminate order of report strategies and facilitate comparison across experiments, the stimulus to be reported first was cued by underlining at presentation of each trial. Large right visual hemifield (RVF) superiorities were found to arise from both first and second reports for naming nouns and CVC nonwords. Drawings and picturable nouns, however, produced only a small RVF superiority arising entirely from subjects' second reports. It is proposed that hemispheric laterality effects for naming visually presented stimuli can arise from three principal sources, and the application of this model to existing studies is outlined.
    Brain and Language 10/1980; 11(1):54-65. · 3.39 Impact Factor
  • A W Young, P J Bion
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    ABSTRACT: Upright or inverted pictures of faces were presented bilaterally, with one face falling in each visual hemifield, to right-handed children aged seven, ten and thirteen years. When a small set of four stimulus faces was used with each child (Experiment I) both boys and girls were found to be better at recognising upright faces falling in the left visual hemifield (LVF). For inverted faces there was no difference between the visual hemifields. When a set of forty stimulus faces was used (Experiment II), boys only were found to be better at recognising upright faces falling in the LVF. These results are interpreted in terms of superiority of the right cerebral hemisphere for processing upright faces. No developmental differences in the degree of this superiority were found in the age range studied.
    Cortex 09/1980; 16(2):213-21. · 6.04 Impact Factor
  • A W Young, P J Bion
    Perceptual and Motor Skills 05/1980; 50(2):366. · 0.49 Impact Factor
  • A W Young, P J Bion
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    ABSTRACT: Right-handed children aged 5, 7 and 11 years were asked to enumerate collections of 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6 dots presented briefly in their left or right visual hemifield. Analysis of variance revealed an overall left visual hemifield superiority for accuracy, interpreted as indicating superiority of the right cerebral hemisphere. Boys showed a greater degree of visual hemifield asymmetry for accuracy than girls. Reaction times for correct enumerations recorded via a voice key were significantly faster to left visual hemifield presentations. Accuracy was found to increase with increasing age, but no developmental trends in laterality were evident with either accuracy or vocal reaction time measures.RésuméOn a demandé à des enfants droitiers âgés de 5, 7 et 11 ans d'énumérer des séries de 2, 3, 4, 5 ou 6 points présentés brièvement dans leur hémi-champ visuel droit ou gauche. L'analyse de variance révélait une supériorité générale de l'hémi-champ gauche pour les réponses exactes, ce qu'on interprétait comme indice de supériorité de l'hémisphère cérébral droit. Les garçons montraient un plus grand degré que les filles dans l'asymétrie de l'hémi-champ visuel pour l'exactitude. Les temps de réaction lors des énumérations correctes, enregistrées à partir d'une clé vocale, étaient significativement plus rapides lors des présentations dans l'hémi-champ gauche. L'exactitude augmentait avec l'âge mais aucune tendance dans la latéralisation selon le développement n'était évidente aussi bien pour l'exactitude que pour les temps de réaction vocale.ZusammenfassungRechtshändige Kinder im Alter von 5, 7 und 11 Jahren wurden aufgefordert, Mengen von 2, 3, 4, 5 oder 6 Punkten, die kurz im linken oder rechten Gesichtsfeld angeboten wurden, zu zählen. Die Varianzanalyse ergab eine Gesamt-Überlegenheit der linken Gesichtsfelder in Bezug auf Genauigkeit, was als Hinweis auf eine Überlegenheit der rechten Hemisphäre interpretiert wurde. Die Knaben zeigten einen höheren Grad von Gesichtsfeldasymmetrie als die Mädchen. Die mit Hilfe eines Stimm-Schlüssels festgehaltenen Reaktionszeiten bei korrektem Zählen waren signifikant kürzer auf Darbietungen im linken Gesichtsfeld hin. Es fand sich eine höhere Genauigkeit mit steigendem Alter, während sich weder bezüglich der Genauigkeit noch der Dauer der Reaktionszeiten eine Entwicklung hinsichtlich der Lateralität abzeichnete.
    Neuropsychologia 02/1979; 17(1):99-102. · 3.48 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

108 Citations
37.56 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1979–1983
    • Lancaster University
      • Department of Psychology
      Lancaster, ENG, United Kingdom