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Publications (3)21.45 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Neuroendocrine responses to stimulation with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (citalopram) were measured to investigate the effects of all-night sleep deprivation on serotonergic function in healthy male subjects (n = 7). We studied citalopram-stimulated prolactin and cortisol plasma concentrations in a placebo-controlled cross-over protocol following sleep and sleep deprivation. Citalopram infusion (20 mg i.v. at 14:20-14:50 h) after a night of undisturbed sleep prompted robust increases in both plasma prolactin and cortisol concentrations. Following a night of sleep deprivation, by contrast, the citalopram-induced prolactin response was blunted, but the cortisol response was not significantly altered. This differential response pattern relates to the distinct pathways through which serotonin may activate the corticotrophic and the lactotrophic systems. While an unchanged cortisol response does not indicate (but also does not refute the possibility of) an altered serotonergic responsivity following sleep deprivation, the suppressed prolactin response could reflect a downregulation of 5-HT1A or 2 receptors. An alternative, not mutually exclusive, explanation points to the possibility that sleep deprivation activates the tubuloinfundibular dopaminergic system, the final inhibitory pathway of prolactin regulation.
    Journal of Psychiatric Research 01/1997; 31(5):543-54. · 4.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pharmacokinetic measurements, neuroendocrine responses, and side effects profiles of intravenous infusions of 20 mg citalopram over 30 minutes during the early afternoon have been studied. Eight healthy male volunteers were enrolled in a placebo- (saline) controlled, single-blind, cross-over protocol. Plasma concentrations of the parent compound showed a double exponential decay. Demethyl and didemethyl metabolites were not detectable, but low concentrations of the propionic acid derivative of citalopram were found. Determination of the citalopram enantiomers yielded a balanced S(+)/R(-) ratio of 0.9 to 1.2. The endocrine response to the drug was characterized by significant increases in plasma prolactin and cortisol. Except for one subject, who developed pronounced side effects, human growth hormone showed a surge following saline that was inhibited following citalopram. Rectal temperature and heart rate were not affected and tolerability was favorable. Because of citalopram's extremely high selectivity for the presynaptic 5-hydroxytryptamine nerve terminals, the present data suggest that it might be a promising tool for the investigation of serotonergic function in the human brain in vivo.
    Neuropsychopharmacology 05/1996; 14(4):253-63. · 8.68 Impact Factor
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Pharmacokinetic measurements, neuroendocrine responses, and side effect profiles of intravenous infusions of 20 mg citalopram over 30 minutes during the early afternoon have been studied. Eight healthy male volunteers were enrolled in a placebo- (saline) controlled, single-blind, cross-over protocol. Plasma concentrations of the parent compound showed a double exponential decay. Demethyl and didemethyl metabolites were not detectable, but low concentrations of the propionic acid derivative of citalopram were found. Determination of the citalopram enantiomers yielded a balanced S(+)/R(−) ratio of 0.9 to 1.2. The endocrine response to the drug was characterized by significant increases in plasma prolactin and cortisol. Except for one subject, who developed pronounced side effects, human growth hormone showed a surge following saline that was inhibited following citalopram. Rectal temperature and heart rate were not affected and tolerability was favorable. Because of citalopram's extremely high selectivity for the presynaptic 5-hydroxytryptamine nerve terminals, the present data suggest that it might be a promising tool for the investigation of serotonergic function in the human brain in vivo.
    Neuropsychopharmacology 01/1996; 14(4):253-263. · 8.68 Impact Factor