N H Scherberg

Hôpital Universitaire des Enfants Reine Fabiola, Bruxelles, Brussels Capital Region, Belgium

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Publications (10)68.9 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Resistance to TSH (RTSH) is an inherited disorder of variable hyposensitivity to TSH. The metabolic consequences can range from euthyroid hyperthyrotropinemia to severe congenital hypothyroidism with thyroid hypoplasia. Although subclinical and mild hypothyroidism fitting the RTSH phenotype is common in the population, the role of genetic factors is far from being understood. Only in rare cases has RTSH been attributed to TSHR or PAX8 gene mutations. OBJECTIVE, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Toward the identification of novel RTSH genes, we studied five large, unrelated families comprising 102 individuals, 56 of whom were affected. Inheritance of RTSH in these families followed an autosomal dominant pattern without evidence for incomplete penetrance, yet expressivity was variable. Considering only fully phenotyped generations, 64% of the progeny was affected, with a 1:1.4 male-to-female ratio. Of 18 affected individuals tested in the neonatal period, two were undetected because of borderline results. The thyroid phenotype was indistinguishable from that observed with PAX8 and TSHR defects. In four families, untreated affected subjects of all ages had elevated serum thyroglobulin levels, consistent with a defect in the thyroid follicle cells. Linkage of RTSH to TSHR and PAX8 was excluded in all five families. For the largest families, we likewise excluded a contribution of genes previously only associated with syndromic forms of RTSH, namely TITF1, GNAS, and FOXE1. These kindreds represent a distinct etiological entity of autosomal dominant RTSH. According to the clinical presentation of these families, genetic causes of mild hyperthyrotropinemia in the general population may be more common than currently appreciated.
    Journal of Clinical Endocrinology &amp Metabolism 08/2005; 90(7):4025-34. · 6.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Isolated TSH deficiency is a rare cause of congenital hypothyroidism. We here report four children from two consanguineous Turkish families with isolated TSH deficiency. Affected children who were screened at newborn age had an unremarkable TSH result and a low serum TSH level at diagnosis. Age at diagnosis and clinical phenotype were variable. All affected children carried an identical homozygous splice site mutation (IVS2 + 5 G--> A) in the TSHbeta gene. This mutation leads to skipping of exon 2 and a loss of the translational start codon without ability to produce a TSH-like protein. However, using specific monoclonal antibodies, we detected a very low concentration of authentic, heterodimeric TSH in serum, indicating the production of a small amount of correctly spliced TSH mRNA. By genotyping all family members with polymorphic markers at the TSHbeta locus, we show that the mutation arose on a common ancestral haplotype in three unrelated Turkish families indicating a founder mutation in the Turkish population. These results suggest that this TSHbeta mutation is among the more common TSHbeta gene mutations and stress the need for a biochemical and molecular genetic workup in children with symptoms suggestive of congenital hypothyroidism, even when the neonatal TSH screening is normal.
    Journal of Clinical Endocrinology &amp Metabolism 08/2004; 89(8):4136-41. · 6.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Familial dysalbuminemic hyperthyroxinemia (FDH), is the most common cause of inherited increase in serum total T4 (TT4) in the Caucasian population. It is caused by a mutation (R218H) in the human serum albumin (HSA) gene, resulting in 10-fold higher affinity for T4 and, in heterozygous affected subjects, a TT4 level 2-fold higher than that in subjects expressing the wild-type HSA only. We now report FDH in a Swiss family, caused by HSA R218P, previously reported in subjects of Japanese origin. In this form of FDH, serum TT4 levels are 14- to 20-fold the normal mean, confirmed by measurements in serum extracts. TrT3 and TT3, concentrations are 7- and 2-fold above the mean, respectively. Thus, to maintain a normal free T4 level, the calculated affinity constant (Ka) of HSA R218P should be about 16-fold higher than that of HSA R218H. Surprisingly, the Ka values measured at saturation were similar: 5.4 x 10(6) and 6.4 x 10(6) mol/L(-1) for HSA R218H, respectively. To determine how subjects with HSA R218P and R218P maintain a euthyroid state despite the markedly high serum TT4, the concentration of dialyzable T4 was measured at increasing amounts of TT4. At a TT4 level equivalent to that found in the subjects with HSA R218P, the absolute FT4 concentrations were 40, 432, and 1970 pmol/L for sera expressing HSAs R218P, R218H, and wild type, respectively. Thus, the affinity of HSA R218P for T4 must be higher than that of R218H to produce an 11-fold difference in FT4 at the same concentration ofTT4 This difference was obliterated at saturating concentrations of TT4 used for the determination of Ka values by the method of Scatchard.
    Journal of Clinical Endocrinology &amp Metabolism 09/2000; 85(8):2786-92. · 6.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report a Belgian girl born in 1983 with isolated thyrotropin (TSH) deficiency. Hypothyroidism without goiter was diagnosed at the age of 2 months, with extremely low total thyroxine (T4) at 0.3 microg/dL (4 nmol/L; N[normal]: 5.6-11.4 microg/dL). Basal TSH, only moderately elevated at 14.8 mU/L (N: 0-5.3; competitive radioimmunoassay, RIA), increased to 18.2 mU/L after thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) stimulation, whereas prolactin increased normally. At age 15 years, after withdrawal of levothyroxine (LT4) therapy for 6 weeks, TRH stimulation slightly increased serum TSH using two immunometric assays, from less than 0.03 to 0.07 and from 0.2 to 0.3 (a monoclonal and polyclonal antibody), and from 1.9 to 4.1 mU/L using a polyclonal TSH antibody and iodinated recombinant TSH. Sequencing of the TSH-beta subunit gene revealed a homozygous single nucleotide deletion in codon 105 producing a frame shift that results in a truncated TSH-beta with nonhomologous 9 carboxyterminal amino acids and a loss of the 5 terminal residues. This mutation was previously reported in one Brazilian and two German families. The abnormal, and presumably biologically inactive, TSH can be detected in serum using appropriate antibodies. Its relatively small amount in serum is due to either reduced secretion or rapid degradation. The occurrence of the same mutation in three families of different ethnic origin suggests that this mutation may be prevalent in the population. Common ancestry or de novo mutations in a hot spot cannot be excluded. Finally, we must be aware that neonatal screening of congenital hypothyroidism based on blood spot TSH measurement will not detect this rare but severe genetic defect.
    Thyroid 06/2000; 10(5):387-91. · 3.54 Impact Factor
  • Thyroid. 01/2000; 10(5):387-391.
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    ABSTRACT: We report the abnormal albumin in members of a Thai family that presented with high serum total T3 but not T4 when measured by radioimmunoassay. In contrast, total T3 values were very low when measured by ELISA and chemiluminescence. The subjects have no goiter, and clinically euthyroid. Their serum free T4, free T3, and TSH were normal. Spiking of T3 to affected serum showed good recovery by radioimmunoassay, but very poor recovery by ELISA and by chemiluminescence. The immunoprecipitation with labeled T3 bound to albumin showed high percent precipitation in affected serum. T3-binding studies showed that the association constant of serum albumin in affected subjects was 1.5 x 10(6) M-1 or 40-fold that of unaffected relatives of 3.9 x 10(4) M-1. In contrast, the Ka of HSA for T4 in an affected subject was only 1.5-fold that of a normal. Albumin complementary DNA from leukocytes of affected member was amplified and sequenced. We found the second nucleotide of normal codon 66 (CTT), a thymine, was substituted by a cytosine (CCT), resulting in the replacement of the normal leucine by proline. This is the first report of variant albumin causing familial dysalbuminemic hypertriiodothyroninemia.
    Journal of Clinical Endocrinology &amp Metabolism 06/1998; 83(5):1448-54. · 6.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein (CDG) syndrome is a newly recognized hereditary disorder that presents with psychomotor retardation, cerebellar ataxia, peripheral sensorimotor neuropathy, and, variably, skeletal abnormalities, lipodystrophy, and retinitis pigmentosa. These abnormalities appear to be produced by a defect that causes reduced carbohydrate content in glycoproteins. We studied seven patients with CDG type I belonging to five unrelated families. The concentration of serum TBG, a glycoprotein of hepatic origin, was measured by RIA and T4 saturation and was found to be below the normal range in three of the seven patients and normal in four of them. More than half of the total serum TBG had reduced sialic acid content and localized on isoelectric focusing (IEF) as two prominent bands cathodal to the three major bands of normal TBG. The latter two bands are responsible for the characteristic IEF pattern or CDG syndrome. TBG in patients with CDG had immunoreactivity indistinguishable from that of normal TBG and had normal affinity for T4, T3, and rT3. Serum total T4, T3, and rT3 were below the normal range in seven, five, and seven patients, respectively. The free T4 index was also below normal in four patients, but the free T4 concentration, measured by equilibrium dialysis at low dilution, and serum TSH were in the midnormal range. The serum total T4 and rT3 levels were disproportionately reduced relative to the serum TBG concentration and compared to the concentrations of these iodothyronines in matched subjects with inherited partial TBG deficiency. Chronic illness cannot explain these changes, because, contrary to patients with nonthyroidal illness, those with CDG had significantly higher serum total T3/T4 and lower rT3/T4 ratios. It is concluded that IEF of TBG is a rapid and simple method for the diagnosis of CDG type I and that the abnormal pattern can be detected as early as 5 days postpartum. Patients with CDG are chemically euthyroid, and it is postulated that the reduction in serum iodothyronine concentrations beyond that explained on the basis of low TBG levels may be due to the interference with binding to TBG by an unidentified substance.
    Journal of Clinical Endocrinology &amp Metabolism 01/1996; 80(12):3744-9. · 6.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to determine the magnitude and direction of immediate phaseshifts of human rhythms following a single exposure to a 3-hour pulse of bright light or physical activity. The pulse of light or activity was presented under constant routine conditions and measurement of the resultant phase-shifts were performed under the same constant routine conditions on the first day following pulse presentation. Four oven rhythms which are strongly dependent on circadian timing, i.e., the rhythms of plasma cortisol, plasma TSH, plasma melatonin and body temperature, were monitored. Based on the analysis of the TSH profiles, our findings indicate that exposure to light around the time of the minimum of body temperature results in phase-advances averaging less than one hour in magnitude. Exposure to light approximately 3 hours before the time of the minimum of body temperature results in 1-2 hour phase delays. Preliminary analyses of the melatonin profiles confirm these observations. Our findings regarding the effects of exercise are still inconclusive.
    05/1993;
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present research was to determine the magnitude and direction of immediate phase shifts of human rhythms following a single exposure to a 3-hr pulse of bright light or physical activity. The pulse of light or activity was presented under "constant-routine" conditions, and measurements of the resultant phase shifts were performed under the same constant-routine conditions on the first day following pulse presentation. Four overt rhythms that are strongly dependent on circadian timing--namely, the rhythms of plasma cortisol, plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), plasma melatonin, and body temperature--were monitored. The analysis of the TSH profiles indicated that exposure to light at about the time of the minimum of body temperature resulted in phase advances averaging less than 1 hr in magnitude. Exposure to light approximately 3 hr before the time of the minimum of body temperature resulted in phase delays of 1-2 hr. Preliminary analyses of the melatonin profiles have confirmed these observations. Our findings regarding the effects of exercise are still inconclusive.
    Journal of Biological Rhythms 02/1993; 8 Suppl:S99-108. · 3.23 Impact Factor
  • R E Weiss, S Balzano, N H Scherberg, S Refetoff
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    ABSTRACT: Generalized resistance to thyroid hormone (GRTH) is an inherited disease that is usually suspected when elevated serum thyroid hormone levels are associated with nonsuppressed thyrotropin. Often these test results are obtained because of short stature, decreased intelligence, and/or hyperactivity with learning disability noted in childhood and adolescence, or because of goiter in adulthood. We detected GRTH at birth by analysis of blood obtained during routine neonatal screening. The proposita, born to a mother with GRTH, had a thyrotropin level of 26 mU/L and a corresponding thyroxine concentration of 656 nmol/L (normal, 84 to 232 nmol/L). Administration of thyroid hormone in doses eightfold to 10-fold above replacement levels (liothyronine sodium, 21 micrograms/kg per day, and levothyroxine sodium, 44 micrograms/kg per day) were required to reduce serum thyrotropin to normal levels without induction of hypermetabolism. This case, and the retrospective finding of high thyroxine levels in five newborns subsequently diagnosed as having GRTH, suggest that measurement of thyroxine at birth, in conjunction with thyrotropin, could allow the early detection of GRTH.
    JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association 12/1990; 264(17):2245-50. · 29.98 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

98 Citations
68.90 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2000
    • Hôpital Universitaire des Enfants Reine Fabiola
      Bruxelles, Brussels Capital Region, Belgium
  • 1996–2000
    • University of Illinois at Chicago
      • Department of Medicine (Chicago)
      Chicago, IL, United States
  • 1998
    • Rajavithi Hospital
      Krung Thep, Bangkok, Thailand
  • 1990
    • University of Chicago
      • Department of Medicine
      Chicago, IL, United States