Minos M Stavridakis

Athens State University, Athens, Alabama, United States

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Publications (15)15.66 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To test the marginal adaptation of Class IV restorations made of different composite materials designed for anterior use. Forty-two extracted caries-free human maxillary central incisors were randomly divided into 7 experimental groups - one per composite tested - for which Class IV cavities were prepared. The microfilled composite materials tested (SolidBond/Durafill [D/SB], Syntac classic/Heliomolar [H/SC], Scotchbond1/ Experiment127 [EXI/SB1], Optibond FL/Point 4 [P4/OBFL], Prime&Bond NT/Esthet-X [EX/PBNT], ART Bond/ Miris [MIR/ART], SE Bond/Clearfil ST [CLE/SE-B]) were inserted in two increments after polymerization of their respective adhesive systems. While under simulated dentinal fluid pressure, specimens were submitted to cyclic incisal stress (1,200,000 cycles, maximum load 49 N) and thermal loading (3000 cycles). Both after polishing and after thermomechanical loading, impressions were made of the surface of each restoration, and epoxy replicas were prepared for the marginal adaptation evaluation using SEM. Perfect margins before loading in enamel ranged from 49.9% (EXI/SB1) to 98.2% (MIR/ART) and after loading from 25.3% (EXI/SB1) to 91.9% (MIR/ART). For margins located in dentin, perfect margins ranged from 16.8% (EXI/SB1) to 100% (CLE/SE-B) before loading and from 4.6% (EXI/SB1) to 67.1% (CLE/SE-B) after loading. The poor results obtained in this in-vitro test with the microfilled composites suggest avoiding their use in large Class IV restorations with margins in dentin.
    The journal of adhesive dentistry 09/2010; 13(5):425-31. · 0.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this article is to describe an easy technique for managing small superficial defects in light to medium fluorosis. The proposed technique is based on a selective abrasion of the superficial enamel and a recreation of the superficial macro and micro morphology. The aesthetic appearance can be enhanced by power or home bleaching. The presented technique can manage enamel defects which are confined in the most external enamel surface with satisfying aesthetic results. This conservative approach may be considered an interesting alternative to more invasive prosthetic techniques based on composite reconstructions or ceramic veneers, minimising invasivity, chairside time and costs for patients.
    British dental journal official journal of the British Dental Association: BDJ online 03/2009; 206(4):205-8. · 1.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the marginal adaptation of mixed Class V cavities restored with Clearfil Protect Bond (Kuraray), Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray), and two experimental combinations of both marketed adhesives, after fatigue and water storage. Four groups (Clearfil Protect Bond, Clearfil SE Bond, Exp. 1 and Exp. 2) of Class V cavities were restored with a microhybrid restorative composite (Clearfil APX, Kuraray). The marginal quality of these restorations was quantified by evaluation of gold-coated epoxy replicas with scanning electron microscopy before loading, after loading, and after a 12-month period of water storage. Data from marginal adaptation along the total margin length, on enamel, and on dentin were analyzed with the Wilcoxon signed rank test for differences within a group and with Kruskal-Wallis in order to assess the differences between groups. The Bonferroni test was used for post-hoc comparisons, and the confidence level was set to 95%. The mean percentages (+/-SD) of "continuous margin" of the total marginal length ranged from 79.5% (+/-13.3) to 62.2% (+/-10.4) and from 70% (+/-11) to 61% (+/-15.1) after loading and after storage, respectively. No significant differences could be detected amongthe different groups. However, the marginal adaptation of Clearfil Protect Bond remained the most stable of all materials tested, as no significant differences were detected between the percentages of continuous margins before loading, after loading, or after storage. The use of an antibacterial adhesive system was as effective as the conventional two-step self-etching adhesive in the marginal adaptation of Class V restorations.
    The journal of adhesive dentistry 07/2007; 9(3):311-7. · 0.91 Impact Factor
  • Stefano Ardu, Minos Stavridakis, Ivo Krejci
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    ABSTRACT: This article describes a minimally invasive technique to treat a severe case of enamel fluorosis using microabrasion to eliminate the hypermineralized, white-colored, superficial enamel layer, followed by home bleaching treatment and chairside re-creation of superficial enamel microstructure. The proposed technique may improve the esthetics of fluorotic teeth without requiring other restorative procedures. Microabrasion followed by home bleaching may be an interesting alternative for the restorative treatment of teeth affected by fluorosis.
    Quintessence international (Berlin, Germany: 1985) 07/2007; 38(6):455-8. · 0.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This in vitro study compared the marginal and internal adaptation of bulk-filled Class I and cuspal coverage direct resin composite restorations filled with different types of adhesive restorative systems and different thicknesses of bonding agent. Seventy-two intact, caries-free, freshly extracted human molars were randomly divided into 12 groups of six teeth each, according to the type of cavity (Class I [I] or Cuspal Coverage [C]), adhesive restorative system (SE Bond/Clearfil AP-X [SE] or Prime&Bond NT/Spectrum TPH [PB]) and thickness of bonding agent (normal or thick layer) in Class I restorations. Standardized Class I and Cuspal coverage cavities with enamel outer margins were prepared and restored with the corresponding type and thickness of bonding agent and respective resin composite. The resin composite was placed and polymerized in one increment (bulk filling). Dentinal fluid was simulated using 1:3 diluted horse serum and fed into the pulp chamber both during restoration and stressing. In six of the 12 groups, the restorations were subjected to 1.2 million mechanical occlusal cycles (maximum force 49 N; frequency 1.7Hz) and 3,000 simultaneous thermal cycles (5-50-5 degrees C). Marginal adaptation before and after mechanical and thermal stressing was assessed by using the replica technique and quantitative evaluation under SEM at 200x magnification. The teeth were dissected in a mesio-distal direction with a slow rotating diamond disc under water cooling, and the internal adaptation was also assessed by using the replica technique under the conditions described. Statistical evaluation of the continuous margin at the external and internal interface was performed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's Studentized Range (HSD) test (p = 0.05). Even though Cuspal coverage restorations (SE- C: 96.89 +/- 1.83 and PB- C: 97.15 +/- 2.93) exhibited statistically significantly better external adaptation than Class I restorations (SE- I: 63.95 +/- 12.82 and PB- I 64.74 +/- 14.62) before stressing, there was no statistically significant difference after mechanical and thermal stressing (SE- C: 76.35 +/- 18.53 and PB- C: 76.02 +/- 12.49 SE- I: 54.67 +/- 10.82 and PB- I: 59.94 +/- 15.20). After stressing, SE Bond Cuspal coverage restorations (SE- C: 96,72 +/- 3,26) exhibited superior internal adaptation compared to SE Bond Class I restorations (SE- I: 57.83 +/- 12.91). No difference was observed in internal adaptation between Prime&Bond NT Cuspal coverage and Class I restorations (PB- C:36.46 +/- 21.82, PB- I: 38.71 +/- 6.76). In Class I restorations, the increased thickness in bonding did not improve the marginal and internal adaptation either before or after stressing. Bulk-filled direct resin composite Cuspal coverage restorations exhibited marginal adaptation similar to bulk-filled direct resin composite Class I restorations. The internal adaptation of Cuspal coverage SE Bond/Clearfil AP-X restorations was superior to all the other groups tested.
    Operative Dentistry 01/2007; 32(5):515-23. · 1.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aims of this study were, first, to measure shrinkage induced by different methods of pulse-delay light curing and, second, to verify their influence on the marginal adaptation of class V restorations in enamel and dentin. Eight groups, comprising seven groups (n = 6) with different pulse-delay parameters and a control group, were compared for dynamic linear displacement and force by using a fine hybrid composite. Based on these results, the pulse-delay curing procedure with the lowest shrinkage force was chosen and tested against the control group with respect to marginal adaptation in class V restorations (n = 8) before and after simultaneous thermal and mechanical loading. Statistically significant differences between groups were found for both shrinkage properties tested, with one pulse-delay group giving the lowest overall shrinkage values. However, the percentages of 'continuous margin' of this group, and of the control before and after loading, were not significantly different in dentin, whereas a significantly lower percentage of 'continuous margin' was detected in the pulse-delay group in enamel after loading.
    European Journal Of Oral Sciences 01/2006; 113(6):531-6. · 1.42 Impact Factor
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    Krejci I, Stavridakis M, Ardu S, Bortolotto T
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    ABSTRACT: In March 2006, researchers, clinicians, and laboratory technicians from all over the world gathered in Berlin, Germany, at the CEREC 20th Anniversary Symposium to share their experiences with this high-technology system that has revolutionized the field of restorative dentistry. CEREC uses CAD/CAM technology to scan the tooth, create a 3-D digital model, and design an esthetic, durable, and biocompatible ceramic restoration, which can then be fabricated in 10 to 20 minutes and placed by the clinician. Patients, clinicians, and laboratory technicians have embraced this unique treatment approach, which provides restorations that look and function like natural teeth in a single appointment. This book presents the proceedings of the conference, offering professionals involved in all areas of restorative dentistry valuable insights and information about this continually evolving technology and how it can be used to improve clinical success.
    01/2006: pages 39-46;
  • Minos M Stavridakis, Afrodite I Kakaboura, Ivo Krejci
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    ABSTRACT: This study measured the degree of remaining C=C bonds (RDB), linear polymerization shrinkage (LPS) and polymerization stresses (PS) of dual-cured resin composite build-up materials using a variety of light exposure scenarios. Four commercially available materials were used: Bis-Core, FluoroCore, Build-it! and Permalute. The RDB was measured using FTIR spectroscopy, and custom-made devices were used to measure LPS and PS values. Data were obtained using three different modes of photoactivation: NLC (No Light-Curing); ILC (Immediate Light-Curing, where 60 second light-curing was applied at the start of the observation period); and DLC (Delayed Light-Curing, where 60-second light-curing was applied 10 minutes from the start of the observation period). Statistical evaluation of the data at the end of the 13-minute observation period was performed with two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Tukey's Studentized Range (HSD) Test (p=0.05) and simple linear regression. Differences in the development of LPS and PS during the 13 minutes were studied using mathematical calculus. Bis-Core presented the highest RDB and Permalute the lowest when ILC was applied, while no differences were found between Build-it! and FluoroCore and NLC and DLC increased RDB for FluoroCore and Permalute compared to ILC; whereas, no differences were noted for Build-it! and Bis-Core. Using DLC, a decrease in RDB was found only for Build-it! FluoroCore and Permalute exhibited a reduction in LPS and PS using NLC relative to ILC. No differences in LPS and PS values were detected for the materials Bis-Core and Build-it! when subjected to NLC or DLC, compared to ILC. Simple linear regression showed that only the two polymerization shrinkage properties studied were highly correlated (LPS-PS r2=0.85). The RDB rate was not correlated with either polymerization shrinkage properties (RDB-LPS r2=0.40; RDB-PS r2=0.57). A study of the evolution of the real-time curves of percentage values of LPS and PS showed that these properties evolved in a similar exponential mode and that, most often, there was a delay in the development of PS.
    Operative Dentistry 01/2005; 30(4):443-52. · 1.31 Impact Factor
  • Minos M Stavridakis, Didier Dietschi, Ivo Krejci
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    ABSTRACT: This study measured the linear polymerization displacement and polymerization forces induced by polymerization shrinkage of a series of flowable resin-based restorative materials. The materials tested were 22 flowable resin-based restorative materials (Admira Flow, Aelite Flow, Aeliteflow LV, Aria, Crystal Essence, Definite Flow, Dyract Flow, Filtek Flow, FloRestore, Flow-it, Flow-Line, Freedom, Glacier, OmegaFlo, PermaFlo, Photo SC, Revolution 2, Star Flow, Synergy Flow, Tetric Flow, Ultraseal XT and Wave). Measurements for linear polymerization displacement and polymerization forces were performed using custom made measuring devices. Polymerization of the test materials was carried out for 60 seconds by means of a light curing unit, and each property was measured for 180 seconds from the start of curing in eight specimens for each material. Statistical evaluation of the data was performed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Tukey's Studentized Range (HSD) test (p=0.05) and simple linear regression. A wide range of values was recorded for linear polymerization displacement (26.61 to 80.74 microns) and polymerization forces (3.23 to 7.48 kilograms). Statistically significant differences among materials were found for both properties studied. Very few materials (Freedom, Glacier, and Photo SC) presented low values of linear polymerization displacement and polymerization forces (similar to hybrid resin composites), while the majority of materials presented very high values in both properties studied. Study of the shrinkage kinetics revealed the exponential growth process of both properties. The polymerization forces development exhibited a few seconds delay over linear polymerization displacement. Simple linear regression showed that the two polymerization shrinkage properties that were studied were not highly correlated (r2=0.59).
    Operative Dentistry 01/2005; 30(1):118-28. · 1.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The color of dental porcelain depends on the type of metal substrate. Little research has been done to document the effects of different types of high-palladium alloys on the color of dental porcelain. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of different high-palladium alloys on the resulting color of dentin porcelain, as well as on that of opaque porcelain after simulated dentin and glazing firing cycles. Three Pd-Cu-Ga alloys, Spartan Plus (S), Liberty (B), and Freedom Plus (F), and 5 Pd-Ga alloys, Legacy (L), IS 85 (I), Protocol (P), Legacy XT (X), and Jelenko No.1 (N), were examined. A Pd-Ag alloy, Super Star (T), was included for comparison to the high-palladium alloys, and the Au-Pd alloy, Olympia (O), served as the control. Six cast discs (16 x 1 mm) were prepared from each of the alloys. Shade B1 opaque porcelain (Vita-Omega) was applied at a final thickness of 0.1 mm. After 2 opaque porcelain firing cycles, the surfaces were airborne-particle abraded, and the specimens were divided into 2 groups. In the first group, 0.9 mm of B1 dentin porcelain was applied. The other group of specimens with only opaque porcelain underwent the same dentin porcelain and glazing firing cycles. Color differences (DeltaE) were determined with a colorimeter between the control and each experimental group, after the second opaque porcelain, second dentin porcelain, and glazing firing cycles. One-way analysis of variance and Dunnett's multiple range test were performed on the DeltaE data (alpha=.05). After the application of dentin porcelain, the 3 Pd-Cu-Ga alloys showed significantly different (P<.05) DeltaE values (S=2.3 +/- 0.5, B=1.4 +/- 0.3, and F=1.3 +/- 0.7) than the control group. After the glazing cycle of this group, the 3 Pd-Cu-Ga alloys and the Pd-Ag alloy exhibited significantly different (P<.05) DeltaE values (S=2.8 +/- 0.8, B=2.2 +/- 0.3, F=1.9 +/- 1.0, and T=1.4 +/- 0.5) than the control group. After the simulated dentin porcelain firing cycles, the specimens with only opaque porcelain exhibited significantly different (P<.05) DeltaE values (S=5.2 +/- 1.4, B=5.4 +/- 0.6, and F=3.9 +/- 0.2) than the control group. The color difference between the 3 Pd-Cu-Ga alloys with only opaque porcelain and the control group increased more after the simulated glazing cycle (S=6.6 +/- 1.5, B=6.3 +/- 0.5, and F=4.6 +/- 0.1). The observed color differences between the Pd-Ga alloys and the control group were not statistically significant at any point. The Pd-Cu-Ga alloys with only opaque porcelain, after the simulated dentin porcelain and glazing firing cycles, exhibited clinically unacceptable color differences. The application of dentin porcelain to the Pd-Cu-Ga alloys resulted in clinically acceptable color differences. The application of dentin porcelain to the Pd-Ag alloy, after the glazing firing cycle, resulted in clinically acceptable color differences (approximately 2.8 to 3.7 DeltaE CIELAB units). The Pd-Ag alloy specimens with only opaque porcelain did not exhibit significant color differences from the control group, whereas significant color differences from the control group after the dentin porcelain and glazing firing cycles were still clinically acceptable.
    Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry 08/2004; 92(2):170-8. · 1.72 Impact Factor
  • Minos M Stavridakis, Felix Lutz, William M Johnston, Ivo Krejci
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    ABSTRACT: To measure the linear displacement and force induced by polymerization shrinkage of a series of resin-based restorative materials. The materials tested were 10 ultrafine midway-filled resin-based composites, mainly used in anterior restorations (Brilliant Dentin, Brilliant Enamel, Charisma F, Pertac II Aplitip, Prodigy, Resulcin, Sculpt-it, Synergy Duo, Tetric and Z100), 11 ultrafine compact-filled composites, suggested by the manufacturers as "amalgam substitutes" for posterior restorations (Alert, Ariston pHc, Definite, EXI-119, EXI-120, Nulite F, Prodigy Condensed, Prodigy High Viscosity, Solotaire, Surefil and Synergy Compact), and six polyacid-modified composites (Compoglass, Dyract, Dyract AP, Elan, F2000 and Hytac Aplitip), also known as compomers. Each property was measured for 180 seconds from the start of curing with the help of custom made devices in eight specimens for each material. Statistical evaluation of the data was performed with one-way ANOVA, Tukey's Studentized Range (HSD) Test (P= 0.05) and simple linear regression. Statistically significant differences among groups and among composites were found for both of the properties that were studied. The ultrafine compact-filled composites (amalgam substitutes) exhibited the least linear displacement, followed by the polyacid-modified composites (compomers) and the ultrafine midway-filled composites, with statistically significant differences among all groups. The groups followed the same order in the polymerization force, with only the compomer-amalgam substitute comparison not being statistically significantly different. The simple linear regression showed that the two studied properties were also highly correlated (r=0.89).
    American journal of dentistry 01/2004; 16(6):431-8. · 1.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of different high-palladium alloys on the resulting color of opaque porcelain. Three Pd-Cu-Ga alloys, Spartan Plus (S; Williams Dental Co/Division of Ivoclar North America, Amhest, NY), Liberty (B; J.F. Jelenko & Co, Armonk, NY), and Freedom Plus (F; J.F. Jelenko & Co); 4 Pd-Ga alloys, Legacy (L; J.F. Jelenko & Co), IS 85 (I; Williams Dental Co), Protocol (P; Williams Dental Co), and Legacy XT (X; J.F. Jelenko & Co); and a Pd-Ag alloy, Super Star (T; J.F. Jelenko & Co), were examined. The Au-Pd alloy Olympia (O; J.F. Jelenko & Co) served as the control. Three cast 16-mm discs, 1-mm thick, were prepared from each of the alloys. After metallurgically polishing and air-abrading, the specimens were oxidized following the manufacturer's recommendations. Shade B1 opaque porcelain (Vita-Omega; Vident, Baldwin Park, CA) was applied at a final thickness of 0.1 mm using a mold. After 2 opaque porcelain firing cycles, the surfaces were air-abraded. The colors of the specimens were measured using a colorimeter and expressed in Commission International de l'Eclairage (CIE) L*a*b* coordinates. Color differences (delta E) were determined between the control and each experimental group. Analysis of Variance and Tukey-Kramer tests were performed on the delta E data. The 3 Pd-Cu-Ga alloys showed significantly greater (p < .01) delta E values (S = 2.8 +/- 1.1, B = 3.0 +/- 0.6, and F = 2.1 +/- 0.2) than the remaining 5 experimental groups (L = 0.7 +/- 0.5, I = 0.7 +/- 0.4, P = 0.7 +/- 0.2, X = 0.7 +/- 0.4, and T = 0.7 +/- 0.5). The directions of the significant color changes were relatively equally distributed along the L*, a*, and b* axes, and all delta L*, delta a*, and delta b* values were negative (lower value, more green and blue relative to control O). This work suggests that a 0.1-mm-thick layer of opaque porcelain in the Pd-Cu-Ga alloys studied, did not reliably reproduce the color of porcelain.
    Journal of Prosthodontics 07/2000; 9(2):71-6. · 0.68 Impact Factor
  • N F AbuJamra, M M Stavridakis, R B Miller
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    ABSTRACT: This article describes a laboratory procedure for the visual evaluation of interarch space and its effect on implant prosthesis design. The method is applicable to patients presenting with completely edentulous arches. Silicone impression material is used to form a resilient cast and an external mold from an existing denture. The denture is duplicated using autopolymerizing acrylic resin. The duplicate denture and resilient cast are mounted on an articulator. Spatial relationships of anatomic landmarks can be evaluated, and a quantitative evaluation of available space can be made. The duplicate denture can also be used as a surgical template to direct implant placement. Reference tables are provided to serve as guidelines in the correlation between available space and minimum space required for various implant-assisted restorations.
    Journal of Prosthodontics 07/2000; 9(2):102-5. · 0.68 Impact Factor
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    Minos M Stavridakis, Ivo Krejci, Pascal Magne
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the thickness of Dentin Bonding Agent (DBA) used for "immediate dentin sealing" of onlay preparations prior to final impression making for indirect restorations. In addition, the amount of DBA that is removed when the adhesive surface is cleaned with polishing or air abrasion prior to final cementation was evaluated. For this purpose, a standardized onlay preparation was prepared in 12 extracted molars, and either OptiBond FL (Kerr) or Syntac Classic (Vivadent) was applied to half of the teeth and cured in the absence of oxygen (air blocking). Each tooth was bisected in a bucco-lingual direction into two sections, and the thickness of the DBA was measured under SEM on gold sputtered epoxy resin replicas at 11 positions. The DBA layer of each half tooth was treated with either air abrasion or polishing. The thickness of the DBAs was then re-measured on the replicas at the same positions. The results were statistically analyzed with non-parametric statistics (Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskal-Wallis test) at a confidence level of 95% (p=0.05). The film thickness of the DBA was not uniform across the adhesive interface (121.13 +/- 107.64 microm), and a great range of values was recorded (0 to 500 microm). Statistically significant differences (p<0.05) were noted, which were both material (OptiBond FL or Syntac Classic) and position (1 to 11) dependent. Syntac Classic presented a higher thickness of DBA (142.34 +/- 125.10 microm) than OptiBond FL (87.99 +/- 73.76 microm). The higher film thickness of both DBAs was at the deepest part of the isthmus (the most concave part of the preparation), while the lowest was at the line angles of the dentinal crest (the most convex part of the preparation). OptiBond FL presented a more uniform thickness around the dentinal crest of preparation; Syntac Classic pooled at the lower parts of the preparation. The amount of DBA that was removed with air abrasion or polishing was not uniform (11.94 +/- 16.46 microm), and a great range of values was recorded (0 to 145 microm). No statistically significant differences (p<0.05) were found either between different DBAs (OptiBond FL or Syntac Classic) or between different treatments (air abrasion or polishing). As far as the effect of different treatments at different positions, polishing removed more DBA from the top of the dentinal crest, but the difference was not statistically significant. Air abrasion removed less DBA from the corners of the dentinal crest (Positions 4 and 6) than the outer buccal part of the preparation (Positions 1 and 2). Neither air abrasion nor polishing removed the entire layer thickness of the DBA in the majority of the cases.
    Operative Dentistry 30(6):747-57. · 1.31 Impact Factor
  • Minos M Stavridakis, Valerie Favez, Edson A Campos, Ivo Krejci
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    ABSTRACT: This research quantitatively evaluated the marginal adaptation of pit and fissure sealants. The occlusal surfaces of 48 intact, caries-free human molars were cleaned with an air-abrasion unit. The teeth were then randomly divided into eight groups of six teeth each according to the type of enamel conditioning, sealant material applied and curing unit used. After applying either 40% phosphoric acid gel (K-etch, Kuraray Co) or a self-etching primer adhesive system (Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray Co), sealant materials of two viscosities were applied (Teethmate F-1 and Protect-Liner-F, Kuraray Co) and cured with halogen (Optilux 500, Demetron) or plasma arc (Apollo-95E, Dental & Medical Diagnostic Systems, Ltd) curing units. The marginal adaptation of the pit and fissure sealant restorations was evaluated by using a computer-assisted quantitative margin analysis in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) on epoxy replicas before and after thermal and mechanical stressing of the teeth. The results were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) at a confidence level of 95% (p=0.05). A post-hoc Tukey HSD-test was used for multiple pairwise comparisons between groups. The null hypothesis was that there was no statistically significant difference between the groups that were tested in this study. The statistically significant differences between groups were more pronounced after loading. In most cases, the self-etching adhesive system (SE Bond) proved as effective as phosphoric acid etching (K-etch). The low viscosity sealant material (Teethmate F-1), in most cases, exhibited better marginal adaptation than the high viscosity material (Protect-Liner F). The high viscosity material performed equally well only when used in combination with the self-etching primer adhesive system as an intermediate layer. The halogen curing unit (Optilux 500) led to better marginal adaptation than the plasma arc curing unit (Apollo 95E), especially after thermal and mechanical stressing.
    Operative Dentistry 28(4):403-14. · 1.31 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

114 Citations
15.66 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006–2007
    • Athens State University
      Athens, Alabama, United States
  • 2000–2007
    • University of Geneva
      • Department of Cariology and Endodontics
      Carouge, GE, Switzerland
    • The Ohio State University
      • College of Dentistry
      Columbus, OH, United States