Maryam Rezvani

University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States

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Publications (10)19.94 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the clinical utility of dual phase computed tomography (CT) for assessment of hepatic metastases in patients with metastatic melanoma. A retrospective case-control study of dual phase CT examinations consisting of late hepatic arterial and portal venous phases performed on patients with melanoma was undertaken. In 2010, 420 dual phase CT examinations were performed on 188 patients. Of these, 46 CT examinations on 24 patients with hepatic metastases were combined with 52 control studies for evaluation. Two blinded reviewers independently evaluated single portal venous phase alone and dual phase imaging on separate occasions. The presence of hepatic lesions, the conspicuity of the lesions, and the likelihood that the detected lesions were metastases was recorded. Agreement between readers, sensitivity and specificity was calculated. In no case was hepatic metastatic disease only apparent on arterial phase imaging. Arterially enhancing hepatic lesions only visible on the arterial phase or much more conspicuous on the arterial phase were present in 10 studies (10%), all of which were benign. Liver metastases were rated as being more accurately assessed on the portal venous phase in up to 100%. In a per scan analysis dual phase and venous phase imaging had similar sensitivities of 96% (95%, CI: 86-100) and 98% (95%, CI: 89-100), respectively. Single portal venous phase imaging is adequate for staging and surveillance in patients with metastatic melanoma.
    European journal of radiology 08/2013; · 2.65 Impact Factor
  • Akram M Shaaban, Maryam Rezvani
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To increase awareness of primary fallopian tube carcinoma (PFTC) and its relationship to serous epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) and breast cancer. To review the characteristic imaging findings of PFTC thereby enabling radiologists to not only diagnose, but aid clinicians in staging, treatment planning and surveillance for recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: There is increasing evidence of a relationship between PFTC and breast cancer and the breast cancer susceptibility gene mutation. Furthermore, studies in breast cancer gene mutation carriers suggest serous EOC arises from the epithelial lining of the fallopian tube. These theories indicate that the incidence of fallopian tube carcinoma is underestimated. Increased awareness is particularly important for radiologists reviewing surveillance studies in breast cancer patients. PFTC has characteristic imaging features that can aid in its detection and differentiation from other pelvic masses. Imaging is also helpful in tumor staging, identifying patients who may benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy and detection of recurrence following treatment. This article discusses the history, pathology, and patterns of spread of fallopian tube carcinoma, as well as reviewing and illustrating the cross-sectional imaging findings.
    Abdominal Imaging 06/2012; · 1.91 Impact Factor
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    Maryam Rezvani, Akram Shaaban
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    ABSTRACT: A variety of benign and malignant entities affect the uterine cervix. These are discussed and illustrated. Cross-sectional and functional imaging can improve the accuracy of traditional clinical cervical cancer staging. Emphasis is placed on magnetic resonance imaging for initial staging and fused positron emission tomography-computed tomography for restaging and surveillance. The imaging appearance of benign cervical pathology is reviewed with ultrasonography as the first-line imaging modality and magnetic resonance imaging for problem solving in difficult cases.
    Topics in magnetic resonance imaging: TMRI 07/2010; 21(4):261-71.
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    Akram Shaaban, Maryam Rezvani
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    ABSTRACT: Ovarian cancer is the second most common gynecologic malignancy. It is the deadliest, largely owing to late stage at the time of diagnosis. Ultrasound is modality of choice in the evaluation of suspected adnexal masses. Magnetic resonance imaging is an excellent problem solver when an adnexal mass is indeterminate on ultrasound. Staging of ovarian cancer remains surgical, though preoperative imaging can identify inoperable patients and identify suspicious sites for intraoperative biopsy. This article reviews the use of different imaging modalities in the detection and staging of ovarian carcinoma, and discusses imaging indications, radiologic features, and the shortcomings of imaging.
    Topics in magnetic resonance imaging: TMRI 07/2010; 21(4):247-59.
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this article is to describe and illustrate the CT findings of acute cholecystitis and its complications. CONCLUSION: CT findings suggesting acute cholecystitis should be interpreted with caution and should probably serve as justification for further investigation with abdominal ultrasound. CT has a relatively high negative predictive value, and acute cholecystitis is unlikely in the setting of a negative CT. Complications of acute cholecystitis have a characteristic CT appearance and include necrosis, perforation, abscess formation, intraluminal hemorrhage, and wall emphysema.
    American Journal of Roentgenology 06/2010; 194(6):1523-9. · 2.90 Impact Factor
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    Akram Shaaban, Maryam Rezvani
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Ovarian cancer is the second most common gynecologic malignancy. It is the deadliest, largely owing to late stage at the time of diagnosis. Ultrasound is modality of choice in the evaluation of suspected adnexal masses. Magnetic resonance imaging is an excellent problem solver when an adnexal mass is indeterminate on ultrasound. Staging of ovarian cancer remains surgical, though preoperative imaging can identify inoperable patients and identify suspicious sites for intraoperative biopsy. This article reviews the use of different imaging modalities in the detection and staging of ovarian carcinoma, and discusses imaging indications, radiologic features, and the shortcomings of imaging.
    Clinical obstetrics and gynecology 04/2009; 52(1):73-93. · 2.06 Impact Factor
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    Maryam Rezvani, Akram Shaaban
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A variety of benign and malignant entities affect the uterine cervix. These are discussed and illustrated. Cross-sectional and functional imaging can improve the accuracy of traditional clinical cervical cancer staging. Emphasis is placed on magnetic resonance imaging for initial staging and fused positron emission tomography-computed tomography for restaging and surveillance. The imaging appearance of benign cervical pathology is reviewed with ultrasonography as the first-line imaging modality and magnetic resonance imaging for problem solving in difficult cases.
    Clinical obstetrics and gynecology 04/2009; 52(1):94-111. · 2.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ovarian malignant germ cell tumors (OMGCTs) are heterogeneous tumors that are derived from the primitive germ cells of the embryonic gonad. OMGCTs are rare, accounting for about 2.6% of all ovarian malignancies, and typically manifest in adolescence, usually with abdominal pain, a palpable mass, and elevated serum tumor marker levels, which may serve as an adjunct in the initial diagnosis, monitoring during therapy, and posttreatment surveillance. Dysgerminoma, the most common malignant germ cell tumor, usually manifests as a solid mass. Immature teratomas manifest as a solid mass with scattered foci of fat and calcifications. Yolk sac tumors usually manifest as a mixed solid and cystic mass. Capsular rupture or the bright dot sign, a result of increased vascularity and the formation of small vascular aneurysms, may be present. Embryonal carcinomas and polyembryomas rarely manifest in a pure form and are more commonly part of a mixed germ cell tumor. Some OMGCTs have characteristic features that allow a diagnosis to be confidently made, whereas others have nonspecific features, which make them difficult to diagnose. However, imaging features, the patient's age at presentation, and tumor markers may help establish a reasonable differential diagnosis. Malignant ovarian germ cell tumors spread in the same manner as epithelial ovarian neoplasms but are more likely to involve regional lymph nodes. Preoperative imaging may depict local extension, peritoneal disease, and distant metastases. Suspicious areas may be sampled during surgery. Because OMGCTs are almost always unilateral and are chemosensitive, fertility-sparing surgery is the standard of care. ©RSNA, 2014.
    Radiographics 34(3):777-801. · 2.79 Impact Factor
  • Maryam Rezvani, Akram M Shaaban
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    ABSTRACT: The increasing use of imaging necessitates familiarity with a wide variety of pathologic conditions, both common and rare, that affect the fallopian tube. These conditions should be considered in the differential diagnosis for pelvic disease in the nonpregnant patient. The most common condition is pelvic inflammatory disease, which represents a spectrum ranging from salpingitis to pyosalpinx to tubo-ovarian abscess. Isolated tubal torsion is rare but is nevertheless an important diagnosis to consider in the acute setting. Hematosalpinx in a nonpregnant patient can be an indicator of tubal endometriosis; however, care should be taken to exclude tubal torsion or malignancy. Current evidence suggests that the prevalence of primary fallopian tube carcinoma (PFTC) is underestimated and that there is a relationship between PFTC and breast cancer. PFTC has characteristic imaging features that can aid in its detection and in differentiating it from other pelvic masses. Familiarity with fallopian tube disease and the imaging appearances of both the normal and abnormal fallopian tube is crucial for optimal diagnosis and management in emergent as well as ambulatory settings.
    Radiographics 31(2):527-48. · 2.79 Impact Factor
  • Radiographics 34(2):427-8. · 2.79 Impact Factor