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Publications (3)6.19 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns, susceptibility to 26 antimicrobial agents used in veterinary and human medicine, and prevalence of antimicrobial resistance genes of Escherichia coli isolated from cows with mastitis were evaluated. Among 135 E. coli isolates, PFGE analysis revealed 85 different genetic patterns. All E. coli were resistant to two or more antimicrobials in different combinations. Most E. coli were resistant to antimicrobials used in veterinary medicine including ampicillin (98.4%, >or=32 microg/ml) and many E. coli were resistant to streptomycin (40.3%, >or=64 microg/ml), sulfisoxazole (34.1%, >or=512 microg/ml), and tetracycline (24.8%, >or=16 microg/ml). Most E. coli were resistant to antimicrobials used in human medicine including aztreonam (97.7%, >or=32 microg/ml) and cefaclor (89.9%, >or=32 microg/ml). Some E. coli were resistant to nitrofurantoin (38%, >or=128 microg/ml), cefuroxime (22.5%, >or=32 microg/ml), fosfomycin (17.8%, >or=256 microg/ml). All E. coli were susceptible to ciprofloxacin and cinoxacin. Almost 97% (123 of 127) of ampicillin-resistant isolates carried ampC. Eleven of 52 (21.2%) streptomycin-resistant isolates carried strA, strB and aadA together and 29 streptomycin-resistant isolates (55.8%) carried aadA alone. Among 44 sulfisoxazole-resistant E. coli, 1 isolate (2.3%) carried both sulI and sulII, 12 (27.3%) carried sulI and 10 (22.7%) isolates carried sulII. Among 32 tetracycline-resistant isolates, 14 (43.8%) carried both tetA and tetC and 14 (43.8%) carried tetC. Results of this study demonstrated that E. coli from cows with mastitis were genotypically different, multidrug resistant and carried multiple resistance genes. These bacteria can be a reservoir for antimicrobial resistance genes and can play a role in the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance genes to other pathogenic and commensal bacteria in the dairy farm environment.
    Veterinary Microbiology 11/2007; 124(3-4):319-28. · 3.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A study was conducted to determine whether intramammary antibiotic treatment of heifer mammary glands following the first milking after calving was effective for reducing the percentage of mammary quarters infected during early lactation. Jersey and Holstein heifers from two research herds were assigned to one of three treatment groups: (1) no intramammary infusion following the first milking after parturition, (2) intramammary infusion of all quarters with pirlimycin hydrochloride following the first milking after parturition and (3) intramammary infusion of all quarters with novobiocin sodium plus penicillin G procaine following the first milking after parturition. Almost 93% of Jersey heifers (40/43) and 73.1% of quarters (125/171) were infected at the first milking. Almost 77% of quarters (33/43) were cured following treatment with pirlimycin, 61.8% (21/34) were cured following treatment with penicillin-novobiocin and 39.6% (19/48) of infections were eliminated spontaneously in the untreated control group. Significantly fewer infections were observed in pirlimycin or penicillin-novobiocin treated mammary glands of Jersey heifers during early lactation than in untreated control mammary glands. Almost 89% of Holstein heifers (32/36) and 52.8% of quarters (76/144) were infected at the first milking. About 57% (12/21) of quarters were cured following treatment with pirlimycin, 41.4% (12/29) were cured following treatment with penicillin-novobiocin and 23.1% (6/26) of infections were eliminated spontaneously in the untreated negative control group. Significantly fewer infections were observed in pirlimycin treated mammary glands of Holstein heifers during early lactation than in untreated control mammary glands. However, no significant differences were observed following penicillin-novobiocin treatment of Holstein heifers after the first milking of lactation compared with untreated control quarters. Coagulase-negative staphylococci, Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp dysgalactiae were isolated most frequently in heifers from both herds.
    J Dairy Res 06/2007; 74(2):211-7. · 1.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fifty-one chronically infected lactating dairy cows were used to evaluate the efficacy of extended pirlimycin therapy regimens for treatment of intramammary infections by environmental Streptococcus spp and Staphylococcus aureus. Cows (n = 47) with one or more infected mammary quarters were blocked by parity and randomly allocated to one of three groups for treatment with pirlimycin (50 mg/mammary quarter) as follows: one treatment per day for 2 days (n = 36 infected mammary quarters); one treatment per day for 5 days (n = 36 infected mammary quarters); and one treatment per day for 8 days (n = 20 infected mammary quarters). Four cows with nine infected mammary quarters were included as untreated controls. Milk samples from each mammary quarter were collected 7 days before treatment, immediately before treatment, and weekly for 4 weeks after the final treatment for microbiological evaluation. A bacteriologic cure was defined as a treated, infected quarter that was bacteriologically negative for the presence of previously identified bacteria at weekly intervals after treatment. Efficacy of pirlimycin therapy against intramammary infections caused by environmental Streptococcus spp and S. aureus was 44.4%, 61.1%, and 95.0% for the 2-, 5-, and 8-day treatment regimens, respectively. None of the infections in the untreated control quarters was cured. Significant differences in efficacy were detected between all pirlimycin groups and the untreated control group, between the 8- and 2-day treatment regimens, and between the 8-day and 5-day treatment regimens (P < or = .05). Results of this study indicate that extended pirlimycin therapy was effective in eliminating intramammary infections caused by environmental streptococci and S. aureus in lactating dairy cows.
    Veterinary therapeutics: research in applied veterinary medicine 01/2002; 3(4):373-80. · 1.69 Impact Factor