Marie-Dominique Martory

Université de Fribourg, Fribourg, FR, Switzerland

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Publications (5)7.24 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Bilingual aphasia generally affects both languages. However, the age of acquisition of the second language (L2) seems to play a role in the anatomo-functional correlation of the syntactical/grammatical processes, thus potentially influencing the L2 syntactic impairment following a stroke. The present study aims to analyze the influence of late age of acquisition of the L2 on syntactic impairment in bilingual aphasic patients. Twelve late bilingual participants (speaking French as L2 and either English, German, Italian or Spanish as L1) with stroke-induced aphasia participated in the study. The MAST or BAT aphasia batteries were used to evaluate overall aphasia score. An auditory syntactic judgement task was developed and used to test participants syntactic performance. The overall aphasia scores did not differ between L1 and L2. In a multiple case analysis, only one patient had lower scores in L2. However, four patients presented significantly lower performances in syntactic processing in the late L2 than in their native language (L1). In these four patients the infarct was localized, either exclusively or at least partially, in the pre-rolandic region. This pilot study suggests that, in late bilingual aphasics, syntactic judgment abilities may be more severely impaired in L2, and that this syntactic deficit is most likely to occur following anterior lesions.
    Brain and Language 06/2011; 119(3):238-42. · 3.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although handwriting is a daily life activity commonly attributed to the left hemisphere in the majority of right-handers, it is also known to require attentional and spatial mechanisms that rely on right hemispheric processing. The underlying spatial organization of handwriting in patients with right brain damage remains unresolved. Here we show in a patient with circumscribed right superior parietal damage that handwriting systematically depends on the hand's position in space with respect to her body-midline. Most importantly, handwriting in contralesional space not only leads to spatial but also to language errors. This suggests that the right hemisphere's role in handwriting may surpass its generally assumed purely spatial contribution. We discuss our results in term of co-registration between both cerebral hemispheres in language processing.
    Neuroreport 11/2004; 15(16):2545-8. · 1.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Crossed aphasia refers to language deficits induced by unilateral right hemisphere injuries in right-handed people who had no previous history of brain damage. One of the intriguing questions concerning crossed aphasia is the atypical language representation in the brain. In this respect, fMRI is a valuable tool for understanding the neural basis of crossed aphasia. Here, we used neuropsychological and fMRI language tasks in a right-handed subject who presented a crossed aphasia due to a right frontal meningioma. fMRI maps from two language tasks showed bilateral patterns of activation. In the light of previous studies reporting much frequent bilateral than exclusive right hemisphere representations, we hypothesise that some crossed aphasia cases could occur in subjects with bilateral language representation.
    Neuroreport 05/2004; 15(5):785-90. · 1.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Here we describe a patient with epilepsy (secondary to left parieto-temporal brain damage) suffering from the paroxysmal unilateral experience of hearing a person in her near extrapersonal space. The paroxysmal auditory experience was associated with a deficit in spatial auditory perception and other paroxysmal disorders of somatognosia. Based on these findings, it is suggested that the paroxysmal hearing of a person nearby corresponds to an auditory disorder of somatognosia.
    Neurocase 09/2003; 9(4):329-39. · 1.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neuropsychology is a scientific discipline, born in the XIX century, and bridges the fields of neurology and psychology. Neuropsychologists apply scientific knowledge about the relationship between brain function and mental performances. The major clinical role of a neuropsychological evaluation is to help to establish medical and functional diagnosis in patients (adults or infants) with different neurological pathologies such as stroke, traumatic brain injury, dementia, epilepsy.... Such analysis necessitates accurate observation of behaviour and administration of tests of mental abilities (e.g. language, memory...). Test results can also help to clarify the nature of cognitive difficulties and to support the formulation of plans for neuropsychological therapy and functional adjustment in every day life.
    Revue medicale de la Suisse romande 05/2003; 123(4):263-7.