Maria Gloria Mumolo

University of Florence, Florence, Tuscany, Italy

Are you Maria Gloria Mumolo?

Claim your profile

Publications (30)91.72 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Chronic constipation is often diagnosed and treated by general practitioners (GPs). The aim of the study was to evaluate the management of constipation by a cohort of Italian GPs. Over the course of 1 month, 41 GPs recorded tests and therapies suggested to patients complaining of chronic constipation. They were classified according to the Rome III criteria as constipated irritable bowel syndrome (C-IBS), functional constipation (FC), or "self-perceived constipation" (SPC) (not consistent with the Rome criteria). The most frequently prescribed tests for the 229 patients (147 FC, 50 C-IBS, 32 SPC) were routine blood tests (59.3 %), abdominal ultrasounds (37.2 %), thyroid function (36.7 %), fecal occult blood tests (36.7 %), and tumor markers (35 %). Patient sex and age, GP age, and whether the diagnosis was new influenced the GP's request, but FC, C-IBS, or SPC status did not. Dietary suggestions (81.9 %), fiber supplements (59.7 %), reassurance (50.9 %), and laxatives (30.5 %) were the most frequently prescribed treatments. Antispasmodics were more frequently suggested for C-IBS patients; dietary suggestions, fiber, and enemas were more frequently prescribed in SPC patients. Patient and GP age and whether the diagnosis was new influenced the GP's choice of treatment. The Rome III criteria do not influence diagnostic strategies and only slightly influence therapeutic strategies of GPs. Other factors (age, gender, new or old diagnosis) have more influence on GPs choice of investigations and treatment.
    Techniques in Coloproctology 11/2013; · 1.54 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The key role of the brain-gut axis in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has been recognized. The aim of this study was to assess the possible association between IBS, neuroendocrine markers, and psychological features. METHODS: One hundred and twenty-five consecutive IBS patients and 105 healthy subjects were enrolled. Plasma serotonin, plasma and urinary cortisol, and plasma neuropeptide Y levels were evaluated. All patients were given a questionnaire to assess IBS symptom severity. In 66 patients, a psychodiagnostic assessment was carried out. RESULTS: A high incidence of specific psychological features, including state anxiety (69.69 %), trait anxiety (54.54 %), obsessions and compulsions (28.78 %), was observed in IBS patients. A positive correlation between neuropeptide Y and state anxiety (r = 0.287, p = 0.024) and simulation/social ingenuity (r = 0.269, p = 0.039) was found in these patients. In diarrhea-predominant IBS, plasma cortisol was linearly related to plasma serotonin (r = 0.5663, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In IBS patients, a significant correlation was found between specific psychological features and neuroendocrine markers, especially plasma cortisol and neuropeptide Y; in diarrhea-predominant IBS, a correlation between plasma cortisol and serotonin was found, although it needs to be confirmed in more extensive cohorts.
    International Journal of Colorectal Disease 02/2013; · 2.24 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: 5HTTLPR polymorphism of serotonin transporter yields short (S) and long (L) alleles. SS and LS genotypes are associated with reduced expression of serotonin transporter. This cross-sectional study investigated the association of 5HTTLPR with symptom severity of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Patients with IBS (Rome III) and healthy controls were included. Genomic DNA was extracted from saliva, and 5HTTLPR alleles were assessed by polymerase chain reaction. IBS symptom severity was evaluated by means of IBS-SSS questionnaire. Two hundreds and four IBS patients (159 females; mean age: 39.6±12.3 years; 106 with constipation: C-IBS; 98 with diarrhea: D-IBS) and 200 healthy controls (154 females; mean age: 40.4±15.8 years) were enrolled. The overall IBS-SSS value was higher in LS/SS than LL patients (319.0±71.5 versus 283.8±62.3; P = 0.0006). LS/SS patients had also higher values of abdominal pain (59.7±21.0 versus 51.0±18.8; P = 0.020) and bowel dissatisfaction (80.1±23.9 versus 70.5±22.8; P = 0.035). The overall IBS-SSS values in C-IBS and D-IBS patients were 317.2±68.3 and 296.1±71.4, respectively (P = 0.192), with significantly higher values for abdominal distension (65.0±24.4 versus 51.4±24.8; P = 0.0006), but not for bowel dissatisfaction (80.5±21.7 versus 72.9±25.7; P = 0.138). Frequencies of 5HTTLPR genotypes did not differ significantly when comparing IBS patients (overall or upon stratification in C-IBS and D-IBS) with healthy controls. In conclusion, the LS and SS genotypes are significantly correlated with IBS symptom severity, although their possible direct causal role remains to be proven. In addition, the present findings do not support an association of 5HTTLPR with IBS or its clinical presentation in terms of bowel habit predominance.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(2):e54831. · 3.73 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To investigate the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in patients with a laryngoscopic diagnosis of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). Between May 2011 and October 2011, 41 consecutive patients with laryngopharyngeal symptoms (LPS) and laryngoscopic diagnosis of LPR were empirically treated with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for at least 8 wk, and the therapeutic outcome was assessed through validated questionnaires (GERD impact scale, GIS; visual analogue scale, VAS). LPR diagnosis was performed by ear, nose and throat specialists using the reflux finding score (RFS) and reflux symptom index (RSI). After a 16-d wash-out from PPIs, all patients underwent an upper endoscopy, stationary esophageal manometry, 24-h multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH (MII-pH) esophageal monitoring. A positive correlation between LPR diagnosis and GERD was supposed based on the presence of esophagitis (ERD), pathological acid exposure time (AET) in the absence of esophageal erosions (NERD), and a positive correlation between symptoms and refluxes (hypersensitive esophagus, HE). The male/female ratio was 0.52 (14/27), the mean age ± SD was 51.5 ± 12.7 years, and the mean body mass index was 25.7 ± 3.4 kg/m(2). All subjects reported one or more LPS. Twenty-five out of 41 patients also had typical GERD symptoms (heartburn and/or regurgitation). The most frequent laryngoscopic findings were posterior laryngeal hyperemia (38/41), linear indentation in the medial edge of the vocal fold (31/41), vocal fold nodules (6/41) and diffuse infraglottic oedema (25/41). The GIS analysis showed that 10/41 patients reported symptom relief with PPI therapy (P < 0.05); conversely, 23/41 did not report any clinical improvement. At the same time, the VAS analysis showed a significant reduction in typical GERD symptoms after PPI therapy (P < 0.001). A significant reduction in LPS symptoms. On the other hand, such result was not recorded for LPS. Esophagitis was detected in 2/41 patients, and ineffective esophageal motility was found in 3/41 patients. The MII-pH analysis showed an abnormal AET in 5/41 patients (2 ERD and 3 NERD); 11/41 patients had a normal AET and a positive association between symptoms and refluxes (HE), and 25/41 patients had a normal AET and a negative association between symptoms and refluxes (no GERD patients). It is noteworthy that HE patients had a positive association with typical GERD-related symptoms. Gas refluxes were found more frequently in patients with globus (29.7 ± 3.6) and hoarseness (21.5 ± 7.4) than in patients with heartburn or regurgitation (7.8 ± 6.2). Gas refluxes were positively associated with extra-esophageal symptoms (P < 0.05). Overall, no differences were found among the three groups of patients in terms of the frequency of laryngeal signs. The proximal reflux was abnormal in patients with ERD/NERD only. The differences observed by means of MII-pH analysis among the three subgroups of patients (ERD/NERD, HE, no GERD) were not demonstrated with the RSI and RFS. Moreover, only the number of gas refluxes was found to have a significant association with the RFS (P = 0.028 and P = 0.026, nominal and numerical correlation, respectively). MII-pH analysis confirmed GERD diagnosis in less than 40% of patients with previous diagnosis of LPR, most likely because of the low specificity of the laryngoscopic findings.
    World Journal of Gastroenterology 08/2012; 18(32):4363-70. · 2.55 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To examine the links between quality of sleep and the severity of intestinal symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). One hundred and forty-two outpatients (110 female, 32 male) who met the Rome III criteria for IBS with no psychiatric comorbidity were consecutively enrolled in this study. Data on age, body mass index (BMI), and a set of life-habit variables were recorded, and IBS symptoms and sleep quality were evaluated using the questionnaires IBS Symptom Severity Score (IBS-SSS) and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). The association between severity of IBS and sleep disturbances was evaluated by comparing the global IBS-SSS and PSQI score (Pearson's correlation and Fisher's exact test) and then analyzing the individual items of the IBS-SSS and PSQI questionnaires by a unitary bowel-sleep model based on item response theory (IRT). IBS-SSS ranged from mild to severe (120-470). The global PSQI score ranged from 1 to 17 (median 5), and 60 patients were found to be poor sleepers (PSQI > 5). The correlation between the global IBS-SSS and PSQI score indicated a weak association (r = 0.2 and 95% CI: -0.03 to 0.35, P < 0.05), which becomes stronger using our unitary model. Indeed, the IBS and sleep disturbances severities, estimated as latent variables, resulted significantly high intra-subject correlation (posterior mean of r = 0.45 and 95% CI: 0.17 to 0.70, P < 0.05). Moreover, the correlations between patient features (age, sex, BMI, daily coffee and alcohol intake) and IBS and sleep disturbances were also analyzed through our unitary model. Age was a significant regressor, with patients ≤ 50 years old showing more severe bowel disturbances (posterior mean = -0.38, P < 0.05) and less severe sleep disturbances (posterior mean = 0.49, P < 0.05) than older patients. Higher daily coffee intake was correlated with a lower severity of bowel disturbances (posterior mean = -0.31, P < 0.05). Sex (female) and daily alcohol intake (modest) were correlated with less severe sleep disturbances. The unitary bowel-sleep model based on IRT revealed a strong positive correlation between the severity of IBS symptoms and sleep disturbances.
    World Journal of Gastroenterology 12/2011; 17(46):5089-96. · 2.55 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Barrett's oesophagus is regarded as the most important risk factor for development of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. According to current guidelines, treatment should be limited to symptomatic Barrett's oesophagus. To evaluate the expression of Ki67, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and apoptosis in Barrett's oesophagus after 12 months of double-dose proton pump inhibitor therapy. The effectiveness of esomeprazole and pantoprazole was also compared. Seventy-seven nondysplastic Barrett's oesophagus patients underwent baseline upper endoscopy. Patients were then randomised into two groups: one group was allocated to receive esomeprazole 40 mg b.d. and the other group pantoprazole 40 mg b.d. for 12 months. A follow-up endoscopy was performed at the end of treatment. Sixty-five of 77 patients agreed to undergo oesophageal manometry and 24-h pH-metry. Barrett's oesophagus biopsies, obtained at baseline and after treatment, were analysed using immunohistochemistry to assess Ki67 and COX-2 expression; apoptosis was evaluated using TUNEL. In the esomeprazole group, a significant decrease in Ki67 and COX-2 expression, as well as an increase in apoptosis, were observed (P < 0.05). By contrast, in the pantoprazole group Ki67, COX-2 and apoptosis did not vary significantly from baseline. By 24-h oesophageal pH-monitoring, a normal acid exposure time was recorded in patients treated with esomeprazole, while those allocated to pantoprazole displayed abnormal acid exposure (P < 0.05). Treatment of Barrett's oesophagus patients with high-dose esomeprazole, but not pantoprazole, promoted a decrease in proliferative markers, concomitantly with a decrease in apoptotic cell death. Moreover, esomeprazole allowed a better oesophageal acid control than pantoprazole.
    Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics 03/2011; 33(9):1019-27. · 4.55 Impact Factor
  • Digestive and Liver Disease - DIG LIVER DIS. 01/2011; 43.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIP) is an infrequent complication of an active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We illustrate a case of SLE inactive-related CIP. A 51-year old female with inactive SLE (ECLAM score 2) was hospitalized with postprandial fullness, vomiting, abdominal bloating and abdominal pain. She had had no bowel movements for five days. Plain abdominal X-ray revealed multiple fluid levels and dilated small and large bowel loops with air-fluid levels. Intestinal contrast radiology detected dilated loops. CIP was diagnosed. The patient was treated with prokinetics, octreotide, claritromycin, rifaximin, azathioprine and tegaserod without any clinical improvement. Then methylprednisolone (500 mg iv daily) was started. After the first administration, the patient showed peristaltic movements. A bowel movement was reported after the second administration. A plain abdominal X-ray revealed no air-fluid levels. Steroid therapy was slowly reduced with complete resolution of the symptoms. The patient is still in a good clinical condition. SLE-related CIP is generally reported as a complication of an active disease. In our case, CIP was the only clinical demonstration of the SLE.
    World journal of gastrointestinal pharmacology and therapeutics. 12/2010; 1(6):135-6.
  • Digestive and Liver Disease - DIG LIVER DIS. 01/2010; 42.
  • Digestive and Liver Disease - DIG LIVER DIS. 01/2010; 42.
  • Gastroenterology 01/2009; 136(5). · 12.82 Impact Factor
  • Digestive and Liver Disease - DIG LIVER DIS. 01/2008; 40.
  • Digestive and Liver Disease - DIG LIVER DIS. 01/2008; 40.
  • Source
    Digestive and Liver Disease - DIG LIVER DIS. 01/2008; 40.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Helicobacter pylori is causally associated with gastritis and peptic ulcer diseases. Recent data (meta-analysis) have demonstrated that triple therapy with amoxicillin, clarithromycin, and a proton pump inhibitor has an eradication rate of only 74-76% and new therapeutic protocols may be necessary. The aim of this study was to examine whether adding bovine lactoferrin (bLf) and probiotics (Pbs) to the standard triple therapy for H. pylori infection could improve the eradication rate and reduce side effects. H. pylori infection was diagnosed in 206 patients: in 107 based on an upper endoscopy exam and a rapid urease test, and in 99 by means of the H. pylori stool antigen-test and the C(13) urea breath test (C(13) UBT). The patients were randomized into two groups: 101 patients (group A) underwent standard triple eradication therapy (esomeprazole, clarithromycin, amoxicillin), while 105 patients (group B) underwent a modified eradication therapy (standard triple eradication therapy plus bLf and Pb). Successful eradication therapy was defined as a negative C(13) UBT 8 wk after completion of the treatment. Results were evaluated by intention-to-treat (ITT) and per-protocol (PP) analysis. Data were evaluated and considered positive when P<0.05. At the end of the study 175/206 patients showed negative C(13) UBT results. According to intention-to-treat analysis, the infection was eradicated in 73/101 patients from Group A and in 93/105 from Group B. PP analysis showed 73/96 patients from Group A and 93/101 from Group B to have been successfully treated. More patients from group A than from group B reported side effects from their treatment (P<0.05). The results of our study suggest that the addition of bLf and Pbs could improve the standard eradication therapy for H. pylori infection--bLf serving to increase the eradication rate and Pbs to reduce the side effects of antibiotic therapy.
    The American Journal of Gastroenterology 05/2007; 102(5):951-6. · 7.55 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abdominal pain and bowel habits alterations are common symptoms in the general population. The investigation to differentiate organic from functional bowel disorders represents a considerable burden both for patients and public health service. The selection of patients who should undergo endoscopic and/or radiological procedures is one of the key points of the diagnostic process, which should avoid the abuse of invasive and expensive tests as well as the underestimation of potentially harmful diseases. Over the coming years, clinicians and researchers will be challenged to develop strategies to increase the patient's compliance and to reduce the economic and social costs of the intestinal diseases.
    World Journal of Gastroenterology 02/2007; 13(2):219-23. · 2.55 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Myotonic dystrophy (MD) is characterized by myotonic phenomena and progressive muscular weakness. Involvement of the gastrointestinal tract is frequent and may occur at any level. The clinical manifestations have previously been attributed to motility disorders caused by smooth muscle damage, but histologic evidence of alterations has been scarce and conflicting. A neural factor has also been hypothesized. In the upper digestive tract, dysphagia, heartburn, regurgitation and dyspepsia are the most common complaints, while in the lower tract, abdominal pain, bloating and changes in bowel habits are often reported. Digestive symptoms may be the first sign of dystrophic disease and may precede the musculo-skeletal features. The impairment of gastrointestinal function may be sometimes so gradual that the patients adapt to it with little awareness of symptoms. In such cases routine endoscopic and ultrasonographic evaluations are not sufficient and targeted techniques (electrogastrography, manometry, electromyography, functional ultrasonography, scintigraphy, etc.) are needed. There is a low correlation between the degree of skeletal muscle involvement and the presence and severity of gastrointestinal disturbances whereas a positive correlation with the duration of the skeletal muscle disease has been reported. The drugs recommended for treating the gastrointestinal complaints such as prokinetic, anti-dyspeptic drugs and laxatives, are mainly aimed at correcting the motility disorders. Gastrointestinal involvement in MD remains a complex and intriguing condition since many important problems are still unsolved. Further studies concentrating on genetic aspects, early diagnostic techniques and the development of new therapeutic strategies are needed to improve our management of the gastrointestinal manifestations of MD.
    World Journal of Gastroenterology 04/2006; 12(12):1821-8. · 2.55 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Although general practitioners play a critical role in the management of irritable bowel syndrome because they deal with the most patients, guidelines are developed mainly by specialists. To evaluate the clinical features of irritable bowel patients and the general practitioners' approach to irritable bowel syndrome in Italy. A questionnaire focusing on the management of this syndrome was completed by 28 general practitioners. Clinical features and diagnostic and treatment measures taken in 229 patients were analysed. Only 35.7% of the general practitioners were familiar with the Rome II criteria. Changes in bowel habits and abdominal pain/discomfort were the most common symptoms. Constipation (74.2%) was more frequent as the main symptom than diarrhoea. Routine blood tests (76.4%) and abdominal ultrasound (42.2%) were requested more frequently than colonoscopy (31.1%). At least one specialist consultation was recommended in 63.3% of patients. Drugs (mainly antispasmodics) were prescribed more frequently for diarrhoea (91.4%) than for constipation (55.7%). General practitioners are little acquainted with the Rome II criteria. Diagnostic tests and specialist consultations are often recommended; antispasmodics are the most frequently prescribed drug. Guidelines should be developed together by general practitioners and gastroenterologists to effectively manage patients at a lower cost.
    Digestive and Liver Disease 01/2006; 37(12):934-9. · 3.16 Impact Factor
  • Digestive and Liver Disease - DIG LIVER DIS. 01/2006; 38.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The clinical course of inflammatory bowel disease is characterised by a succession of relapses and remissions. The aim of our study was to assess whether the predictive value of faecal calprotectin-a non-invasive marker of intestinal inflammation-for clinical relapse is different in ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Seventy nine consecutive patients with a diagnosis of clinically quiescent inflammatory bowel disease (38 CD and 41 UC) were followed for 12 months, undergoing regular clinical evaluations and blood tests. A single stool sample was collected at the beginning of the study from each patient and the calprotectin concentration was assessed by a commercially available enzyme linked immunoassay. In CD, median calprotectin values were 220.1 mug/g (95% confidence interval (CI) 21.7-418.5) in those patients who relapsed during follow up, and 220.5 mug/g (95% CI 53-388) in non-relapsing patients (p=0.395). In UC, median calprotectin values were 220.6 mug/g (95% CI 86-355.2) and 67 microg/g (95% CI 15-119) in relapsing and non-relapsing patients, respectively (p<0.0001). The multivariate Cox (proportional hazard) regression model, after adjustment for possible confounding variables, showed a twofold and 14-fold increase in the relapse risk, respectively, in those patients with CD and UC in clinical remission who had a faecal calprotectin concentration higher than 150 microg/g. Faecal calprotectin proved to be an even stronger predictor of clinical relapse in UC than in CD, which makes the test a promising non-invasive tool for monitoring and optimising therapy.
    Gut 04/2005; 54(3):364-8. · 10.73 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

419 Citations
91.72 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013
    • University of Florence
      • Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale e Clinica
      Florence, Tuscany, Italy
  • 2001–2012
    • Università di Pisa
      • Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine
      Pisa, Tuscany, Italy