Mahmut Karapehlivan

Kafkas University, Cars, Kars, Turkey

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Publications (18)13.83 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Introduction The present analysis deals with the biochemical and histopathological effects of l-carnitine in mice with l-asparaginase (ASNase)-induced experimental acute pancreatic injury (API). Methods A total of 32 male Balb/c mice were divided into four groups as follows. Group I (control) was injected with single saline via the intraperitoneal route. Group II received 500 mg/kg of l-carnitine daily with the injected volume of 62.5–75 μl for 25–30 g mice using a Hamilton microinjector applied for 5 days. Group III received a single 10,000 IU Escherichia coli ASNase/kg body weight dose of ASNase at a dose of 500 mg/kg. Group IV received 500 mg/kg of l-carnitine daily and a single dose of 500 mg/kg of ASNase and were decapitated on the fifth day following the injection. Blood and pancreatic tissue samples were obtained for evaluation of histopathological structure and levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), total sialic acid (TSA), glucose, amylase and triglyceride. Results In group III, compared to group IV and group I it was determined that levels of GSH and amylase were significantly lower while levels of MDA, TSA, glucose and triglyceride were higher. Levels of GSH, MDA, TSA, glucose, triglyceride and amylase, especially in group IV, approached that of group I. As a result, l-carnitine for ASNase-induced API mice may be protective against pancreatic tissue degeneration and oxidative stress or lipid peroxidation.
    Digestive Diseases and Sciences 12/2014; · 2.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of omega-3 fatty acid in HgCI2 toxicity in mice. Levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), nitric oxide (NO) and total sialic acid (TSA), and histopathological changes in selected organs were evaluated. Twenty-eight mice were equally divided into 4 groups, namely Groups I-IV. Group I animals received intraperitoneal (ip) injection of physiological saline solution; Group II animals received ip injection of 0.4mg/kg/day HgCI2; Group III animals received ip injection of 0.4mg/kg/day HgCI2 in addition to subcutaneous (sc) injection of 0.5g/kg/day omega-3 fatty acid; and Group IV animals received sc injection of 0.5g/kg/day omega-3 fatty acid. All treatments lasted 7 days. The levels of MDA, NO and TSA were significantly higher in Group II and lower in Groups III and IV as compared to the Group I. GSH level was the highest in Group IV. In histopathology, severe degeneration in liver and kidney was observed in Group II animals. These degrading changes were seen to be reduced greatly in Group III animals. The results suggested that omega-3 fatty acid might attenuate HgCI2-induced toxicity by improving antioxidant status and acute phase response in mice.
    Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology 09/2013; · 1.96 Impact Factor
  • O Atakisi, E Atakisi, A Ozcan, M Karapehlivan, A Kart
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, it was aimed to investigate the effect of n-3 fatty acids (n-3 FA) on diethylnitrosamine (DEN) toxicity with respect to alterations including nitric oxide (NO) formation, uric acid level as well as some liver related enzymes such as aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities in rats. Forty male Wistar albino rats were used as animal materials. Animals were divided into 4 groups and treated as follows: Rats in group 1 (control) were intraperitoneally (i.p) injected with single dose of saline; rats in group 2 were i.p. injected with DEN at a dose of 150 mg/kg/body weight; rats in group 3 were treated with DEN (via single i.p. injection at 150 mg/kg/body weight) plus n-3 FA (at a dose of 0.4 g /kg/day via subcutaneous route in fish oil) for 7 days, and group 4 received n-3 FA via s.c. route at a dose of 0.4 g/kg/day in fish oil for 7 days. The plasma samples were analyzed for NO, uric acid levels as well as for activities of AST, ALT and ALP. Uric acid level was lower in DEN group than in control. In addition, NO level and AST, ALT, ALP activities in DEN group were significantly higher than in control. Nitric oxide concentration, ALT and ALP activities in DEN + n-3 FA treated rats were lower than in DEN alone. Uric acid level in DEN + n-3 FA group was higher than in DEN group. These results suggest that n-3 fatty acids could ameliorate the toxic effects of DEN in part by means of its free radical scavenging activity and may be of therapeutic value in the protection of liver against toxic effects of DEN.
    European review for medical and pharmacological sciences 02/2013; 17(4):467-71. · 1.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of parenteral administration of L-carnitine on some biochemical parameters in Halep (Damascus) goats during the last month of pregnancy. L-carnitine was administrated to goats in group I (n = 13) by subcutaneous injections once a week during the last month of the pregnancy. Physiologic salt solution was administered to goats in group II (n = 12) by the same route during the same period. Differences of glucose concentration between groups were not significant (P > 0.05). Serum β-hydroxybutyric acid (BHB) concentrations in both groups increased until parturition. However, differences between groups were not significant (P > 0.05). Concentration of serum NEFA (Non Esterified Fatty Acid) in group I was lower compared to group II 2 weeks before parturition (P < 0.05). Differences of serum triglyceride and cholesterol concentration between groups were not significant (P > 0.05). Level of glucose concentration in L-carnitine administered goats with twin kids was higher than the controls with twin kids in the 2 nd (P < 0.01) and 3 rd weeks (P < 0.05) before parturition. It was concluded that parenteral administration of L-carnitine might be a protective measure against pregnancy toxemia (ketosis) via increasing serum glucose concentration in goats with twin pregnancy. Gebe Halep (Damascus) keçilerinde L-carnitine uygulamalarının enerji metabolizmasına etkileri Özet: Bu çalışmada, gebeliğin son bir ayı içerisinde bulunan Halep (Damascus) keçilerinde L-carnitine uygulamalarının bazı biyokimyasal parametrelere etkisi araştırıldı. Gebeliğin son bir ayı içerisinde bulunan Grup I' deki keçilere (n = 13) bir hafta aralıklarla L-carnitine subkutan yolla uygulandı. Grup II' deki (n = 12) keçilere ise aynı dönemde subkutan yolla % 0,9'luk serum fizyolojik uygulandı. Grup I ve Grup II' deki keçilerde serum glukoz konsantrasyonları yönünden
  • IV. Veteriner Jinekoloji Kongresi; 01/2010
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    ABSTRACT: An in vivo assessment for the protective effects of silymarin for pyridine toxicity was investigated through cytochrome P450 isoform CYP1A1 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity prevention. Moreover, the effect of pyridine-induced oxidative stress on metallothionein I-II (MT), a scavenger of oxygen-derived free radicals, was investigated. Forty Syrian hamsters were allocated into 4 groups. Syrian hamsters were dosed with pyridine (400mg/kg) intraperitoneally with and without silymarin (200mg/kg daily by gavage) for 4 days. Pyridine induced diffuse degeneration and necrosis of the proximal and distal renal tubular cells; cloudy swelling, necrosis and hepatocellular atypia of the liver; and degenerative changes in the myocardium. The degree of pathological alterations was less severe with simultaneous silymarin application. CYP1A1, iNOS and MT expression levels were elevated in liver, kidney and heart in response to acute pyridine toxicity. Silymarin application abolished or significantly suppressed the induction of CYP1A1, iNOS and MT expressions in liver, kidney and heart of the pyridine-treated Syrian hamsters. Enhanced synthesis of MT by pyridine possibly implies a purposive cellular response to prevent damage caused by oxygen radicals. However, silymarin significantly reduced the oxidative-stress-inducing effect of pyridine as reflected by decreased synthesis of MT. These results suggest that through oxidant generation, pyridine may cause alteration of the metabolic ways, including nitric oxide-mediated CYP1A1 activity.
    Experimental and toxicologic pathology: official journal of the Gesellschaft fur Toxikologische Pathologie 04/2009; 61(3):243-55. · 1.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The effect of orally administered l-carnitine on biochemical parameters was examined in lactating Tuj-ewes. Ewes were orally given 500mg of l-carnitine daily for 3 weeks. To evaluate the changes on selected blood indicators (total protein, albumin, glucose, triglyceride, cholesterol, urea, aspartate amino transferase, alanine amino transferase, lipase, triiodothyronine and thyroxine), blood samples were collected at the beginning of the study, and at the end of 1st, 2nd and 3rd week of study. Oral administration of supplemental carnitine significantly decreased serum triglyceride (P
    Small Ruminant Research 02/2009; 81(2):174-177. · 1.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ozcan, A., Kaya, N., Atakisi, O., Karapehlivan, M., Atakisi, E. and Cenesiz, S. 2009. Effect of kefir on the oxidative stress due to lead in rats. J. Appl. Anim. Res., 35: 91–93.To study the effect of kefir given to the rats, which have been developed oxidative stress through administration of lead, 36 rats were divided into 4 groups, the control group, the lead group, lead and kefir group and kefir group. After 6 weeks of treatment, blood levels of the glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), vitamin E, β-carotene and retinol were determined. The GSH level in the lead group was significantly lower (P
    Journal of Applied Animal Research - J APPL ANIM RES. 01/2009; 35(1):91-93.
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    M Citil, E Uzlu, M Karapehlivan, K. Yapar
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    ABSTRACT: This study was designed to investigate the effect of a single dose glucocorticoid administration on the parameters related to energy metabolism in sheep. Forty healthy lactating fat tailed ewes, 2-3 years old, were obtained from the Farm of the University of Kafkas. The animals were divided into control (n=20) and treated group (n=20). Ewes in the treatment group (n=20) was parenterally given a single dose of 0.025 mg/kg dexamethasone (Deksavet %0.4 enj.®, Interhas, Istanbul-Turkey) at the beginning of the study. Ewes in the control group (n=20) were parenterally given the same dose of placebo at the beginning of the study. All animals were blood sampled before the drug administration and on the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 7th day of injection. Sera samples were analyzed for the determination of concentrations of insulin, β-hydroxybutyric acid (BHB), non esterified fatty acid (NEFA), glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total protein, albumin, globulin and phosphorus. Cholesterol, glucose (P<0.001) and insulin (P<0.05) concentration obtained on day 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 were significantly higher than the baseline values on day 0. Concentrations of cholesterol and glucose peaked on day 7 and 3, respectively. NEFA concentration was significantly lower during the experiment except for day 7 when it peaked (P<0.05). Other examined parameters did not significantly change when compared to the baseline values. Comparison of the control and the treated group revealed a statistically significant increase in the concentrations of glucose on day 2, 3, and 4, cholesterol on day 3, 4, 5, and 7, insulin on day 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 while concentrations of NEFA decreased on day 1, 2, 3, 4, and 7 and phosphorus concentrations decreased on day 4. The results obtained suggest that a single dose of glucocorticoids may help improving energy metabolism through enhancement of gluconeogenesis during lactation.
    Acta veterinaria 01/2009; · 0.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study was designed to disclose some indicators of oxidative stress and inflammation in natural cases of bovine leptospirosis. For this purpose, 12 bulls exhibiting clinical signs of leptospirosis and 10 healthy bulls were used. Animals were subjected to thorough clinical examination and the clinical signs were recorded. All animals were blood sampled in order to determine serum total sialic acid (TSA), lipid bound sialic acid (LBSA), malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), nitric oxide (NO), uric acid (UA), total protein (TP), albumin and glucose. Urine samples were collected from each animal and examined under dark-field microscope to observe spirochetes. Diseased animals exhibited clinical signs suggesting leptospirosis and the diagnosis was supported by positive dark-field microscope examination. Mean TSA (mmol/L), LBSA (mmol/L), TP (g/dl), albumin (g/dl), glucose (mg/dl), MDA (micromol/L), GSH (mg/dl), NO (nmol/ml), and UA (mg/L) levels were 1.63 +/- 0.02, 0.40 +/- 0.10, 7.18 +/- 0.24, 3.23 +/- 0.5, 64.96 +/- 1.88, 5.71 +/- 0.11, 78.68 +/- 0.72, 7.94 +/- 0.34, and 8.75 +/- 0.41 in healthy bulls, and 2.50 +/- 0.05, 0.70 +/- 0.2, 9.27 +/- 0.17, 2.55 +/- 0.62, 107.93 +/- 2.52, 8.82 +/- 0.14, 47.85 +/- 1.85, 14.57 +/- 0.63 and 15.85 +/- 0.80 in leptospirosis cases, respectively. The differences between the two groups were statistically significant (P < 0.001). Increased TSA, LBSA, MDA, NO, UA, TP, glucose and decreased GSH and albumin concentrations were suggestive of inflammation and oxidative stress in diseased bulls. The results obtained may suggest that oxidative damage along with other mechanisms might have taken part in the pathogenesis of bovine leptospirosis and further detailed studies are needed to fully understand the mechanism(s) of the disease.
    Veterinary Research Communications 04/2008; 32(4):333-9. · 1.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: L-carnitine is a cofactor in the transfer of long-chain fatty acid allowing the beta-oxidation of fatty acid in the mitochondria. It is also a known antioxidant with protective effects against lipid peroxidation. In this study, hepatoprotective effect of L-carnitine was investigated against acetaminophen (AA)-induced liver toxicity where mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are thought to be involved in AA hepatotoxicity. Sixty-four Balb/C mice were divided into eight groups. Mice were dosed with single-AA injection (500 mg/kg via the intra peritoneal route) with or without L-carnitine (500 mg/kg for 5 days starting 5 days before AA injection via intra peritoneal route) and sampled at 4, 8 and 24 h following AA injection. AA increased serum AST, ALT, total sialic acid (TSA) and MDA as well as tissue TSA and MDA levels significantly with the highest increase observed at 4 h, but there was a decrease in blood and tissue GSH level. Administration of L-carnitine significantly reduced AA-induced elevations in AST, ALT, TSA and MDA concentrations and increased GSH levels at all sampling points. AA also induced necrosis, hyperemia, sinusoidal congestion and hemorrhage with time-dependent increase in severity, but the degree of necrosis and histopathologic alterations were most severe at 24 h following AA administration. However, the degree of pathologic alterations was less severe with simultaneous L-carnitine application. These results suggest that AA results in oxidative damage in the liver with an acute effect. L-carnitine also has a prominent protective effect against AA toxicity and may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of AA-induced hepatotoxicity.
    Experimental and Toxicologic Pathology 11/2007; 59(2):121-8. · 2.62 Impact Factor
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    A Kart, K Yapar, M Karapehlivan, M Citil
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    ABSTRACT: The protective effect of L-carnitine was investigated against tilmicosin-induced cardiotoxic effects including blood creatine kinase (CK), CK-MB, total sialic acid as well as the alterations in glutathione and malondialdehyde concentrations in mice. Thirty-two Balb/C mice were divided into four groups including group 1 (control), group 2 (L-carnitine, s.c., 500 mg/kg for 5 days), group 3 (tilmicosin, s.c., single dose of 75 mg/kg) and group 4 (L-carnitine plus tilmicosin). Serum CK, CK-MB and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in group 3 compared with those of other groups. Total sialic acid level in group 3 was found to be significantly (P < 0.05) higher than that in groups 1 and 2, as well. Contrary to these results, glutathione level in group 3 was found to be significantly (P < 0.05) lower than that in groups 1 and 2. In group 4, serum CK, CK-MB, MDA and total sialic acid levels were found to be significantly (P < 0.05) lower than those in group 3. These results suggest that tilmicosin is cardiotoxic in mice as evidenced by higher total sialic acid, CK and CK-MB. In addition, tilmicosin caused the decrease in glutathione and increase in MDA levels. However, administration of L-carnitine could ameliorate these adverse toxic effects of tilmicosin in mice.
    Journal of Veterinary Medicine Series A 05/2007; 54(3):144-6. · 0.93 Impact Factor
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    M Karapehlivan, E Atakisi, M Citil, O Kankavi, O Atakisi
    Veterinary Research Communications 02/2007; 31(1):37-41. · 1.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study was conducted to determine the level of certain biochemical parameters reflecting the energy metabolism status on days 1 and 30 of lactation and 3 weeks after drying off in Tuj ewes. The trial was conducted on 10 clinically healthy, 2–3-year-old Tuj ewes. Blood samples were collected on days 1 and 30 of lactation and 3 weeks after drying off. The serum urea concentrations on day 30 of lactation were higher than those on the 1st day of lactation and 3 weeks after drying off (P < 0.001). Similarly, the serum urea concentration on the 1st day of lactation was higher than those 3 weeks after drying off (P < 0.001). Serum uric acid concentrations on day 30 of lactation were higher than those at the 1st day of lactation and 3 weeks after drying off (P < 0.01). Similarly the blood total protein levels 3 weeks after drying off were higher, compared to those on the 1st day of lactation (P < 0.01). A decrease in serum albumin, albumin/globulin and FFA levels were recorded 3 weeks after drying off and on day 30 of lactation compared to those on the onset of lactation (P < 0.001). Serum globulin levels 3 weeks after drying off and on day 30 of lactation were higher than those on the 1st day of lactation (P < 0.01). Whole triglyceride concentration 3 weeks after drying off were higher the compared to those on days 1 and 30 of lactation (P < 0.001). Serum glucose concentrations on days 1 and 30 of lactation were higher than those 3 weeks after drying off (P < 0.01). Serum T3 concentration 3 weeks after drying off and on day 30 of lactation were higher compared to those on the 1st day of lactation (P < 0.001), while, serum T4 levels on day 30 of lactation were lower than those on the 1st day of lactation and 3 weeks after drying off (P < 0.001). Current findings regarding the blood parameters on days 1 and 30 of lactation and 3 weeks after drying off may expand the knowledge for the diagnosis and prognosis of reproductive and metabolic diseases in sheep during these phases and warrants further research.
    Small Ruminant Research. 01/2007;
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    A. Kart, M. Karapehlivan, K. Yapar, M. Citil, A. Akpinar
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    ABSTRACT: Kart A., M. Karapehlivan, K. Yapar, M. Citil, A. Akpinar: Protection through L- Carnitine on Tissue Oxidant Status and Sialic Acid Content in Tilmicosin-Induced Alterations in BALB/c Mice. Acta Vet Brno 2007, 76: 203-207. The macrolide antibiotic tilmicosin is known to induce cardiotoxic effect when administered at large doses. In this work, the effects of tilmicosin were evaluated with respect to alterations in total sialic acid, malondialdehyde and glutathione content of the heart, liver, kidney and lung tissues after single subcutaneous injection of 75 mg/kg tilmicosin with or without L-carnitine (500 mg/kg for 5 days daily via s.c. route) in BALB/c mice. L-carnitine is a co-factor serving in the mitochondrial β-oxidation of long chain fatty acids, and it was reported to be protective in several types of toxicity cases probably via multi-factorial mechanisms. Twenty eight mice were divided into 4 groups including group 1 (control), group 2 (L-carnitine), group 3 (tilmicosin) and group 4 (tilmicosin plus L-carnitine). Following the administration of treatments, tissue samples were collected, and the samples were assayed for malondialdehyde, glutathione and total sialic acid content. Mice receiving tilmicosin treatment alone had significantly higher malondialdehyde and total sialic acid concentrations (except for MDA of lungs) but lower glutathione concentration in selected tissues compared to those of the control, group 2 (Carnitine only) and group 4 (L-carnitine plus tilmicosin) (p < 0.05). However, no significant difference was found associated with the assayed indicators between the control and mice treated with L-carnitine plus tilmicosin. These results suggest that tilmicosin may cause oxidative stress in the heart, liver, lung and kidneys, but the adverse effects could be attenuated by L-carnitine administration.
    Acta Veterinaria Brno - ACTA VET BRNO. 01/2007; 76(2):203-207.
  • A. Ozcan, E. Atakisi, M. Karapehlivan, O. Atakisi, M. Citil
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    ABSTRACT: Ozcan, A., Atakisi, E., Karapehlivan, M., Atakisi, O. and Citil, M. 2007. Effect of L-carnitine on oxidative damage to liver, kidney and spleen induced by phenylhydrazine in mice. J. Appl. Anim. Res., 32: 97–100.To investigate the ameliorative effect ofL- carnitine on phenylhydrazine induced oxidative damage to liver, kidney and spleen, twenty-eight Swiss albino mice were divided into four groups and injected 0.9% NaCl (control), 40 mg/kg/day phenylhydrazine, phenylhydrazine+L-carnitine or 1000 mg/kg/day L-carnitine. Malondialdehyde (MDA) level was found to be significantly (P
    Journal of Applied Animal Research - J APPL ANIM RES. 01/2007; 32(1):97-100.
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    K. Yapar, Asim Kart, M Karapehlivan, M Citil
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    ABSTRACT: L-carnitine is an essential quarternary amine having an important role in the β-oxidation of fatty acids. Although L-carnitine was shown to be protective against toxic effects of some chemicals the dose-effect relationship with respect to its antioxidant action and protection from lipid peroxidation is unknown. To evaluate the dose-response profile of L-carnitine on blood sialic acid, glutathione and malondialdehyde concentrations, 40 mice were randomly allocated to 4 groups. Experimental mice were treated with intraperitoneal saline for 5 days (Group 1), L-carnitine at 100 mg/kg for 5 days (Group 2), L-carnitine at 250 mg/kg for 5 days (Group 3), L-carnitine at 500 mg/kg for 5 days (Group 4). Following the treatments, blood samples were collected, and blood glutathione, malondialdehyde and sialic acid concentrations were determined. L-carnitine provided an antioxidant action at doses of 100, 250 and 500 mg/kg with the strongest antioxidant action observed at 500 mg/kg dose. There was a significant increase in malondialdehyde and sialic acid concentrations at all doses of Lcarnitine with the highest effect seen at 500 mg/kg dose. In addition, Lcarnitine caused a dose-dependent elevation in glutathione level. These results suggest that L-carnitine applied at 500 mg/kg dose provides strong antioxidant action by increasing glutathione, malondialdehyde and sialic acid in BALB/c mice.
    Acta Veterinaria. 01/2007;