M Khaleduzzaman

Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan

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Publications (11)32.03 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: A 450-kDa human epidermal autoantigen was originally identified as a protein that reacted with the serum from an individual with a subepidermal blistering disease. Molecular cloning of this protein has now shown that it contains 5065 amino acids and has a molecular mass of 552 kDa. As reported previously this protein, which we call epiplakin, belongs to the plakin family, but it has some very unusual features. Epiplakin has 13 domains that are homologous to the B domain in the COOH-terminal region of desmoplakin. The last five of these B domains, together with their associated linker regions, are particularly strongly conserved. However, epiplakin lacks a coiled-coil rod domain and an amino-terminal domain, both of which are found in all other known members of the plakin family. Furthermore, no dimerization motif was found in the sequence. Thus, it is likely that epiplakin exists in vivo as a single-chain structure. Epitope mapping experiments showed that the original patient's serum recognized a sequence unique to epiplakin, which was not found in plectin. Immunofluorescence staining revealed the presence of epiplakin in whole sheets of epidermis and esophagus, in glandular cells of eccrine sweat and parotid glands and in mucous epithelial cells in the stomach and colon.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 04/2001; 276(16):13340-13347. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The amino terminal domain of collagen XI has a unique structure, which is believed to participate in the regulation of matrix assembly. Interestingly, several distinct isoforms of the amino terminal domain of alpha1(XI) and alpha2(XI) collagen chains exist as a result of alternative splicing. Here we report the analysis of the alternative splicing pattern of the mouse alpha1(XI) collagen gene (Col11a1). Like other vertebrate species, the mutually exclusive expression of exons 6A and 6B of Col11a1 results in the inclusion in the alpha1 chain of either an acidic peptide (pI 3.14) or a basic peptide (pI 11.66). Expression of these two exons was monitored in several tissues of the 16.5-day mouse embryo by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, with exon-specific cDNA probes and peptide-specific antibodies, respectively. The results documented that isoforms containing the exon 6B-encoded peptide accumulate predominantly in the vertebrae, skeletal muscles and intestinal epithelium. By contrast, exon 6A products were found to be most abundant in the smooth muscle cells of the intestine, aorta and lung. The results using in situ hybridization confirmed those using immunohistochemistry. Albeit correlative, the evidence suggests distinct contributions of the two peptides to the differential assembly of tissue-specific matrices.
    Matrix Biology 03/2001; 20(1):53-61. · 3.19 Impact Factor
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    Y L Wu, H Sumiyoshi, M Khaleduzzaman, Y Ninomiya, H Yoshioka
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    ABSTRACT: Several overlapping cDNA clones corresponding to the entire coding sequence of the mouse alpha1(V) collagen gene (Col5a1) were isolated. The conceptual amino acid translation indicated a high degree of sequence identity (94%) with the human alpha1(V) chain. All of the important structures previously noted in the human alpha1(V) chain were also conserved in the mouse chain. The alpha1(V) transcripts were easily detected in mouse embryos as early as 11 days post coitum (d.p.c.). The transcripts were widely distributed in non-cartilaginous and cartilaginous tissues. Finally, we calculated the ratio of transcripts of alpha1(V):alpha2(V):alpha1(XI) in the calvaria and tongue of 18 d.p.c. embryos using the competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique. The results raised the possibility that there are at least two different kind of types V/XI collagen heterotrimers in mouse embryonic tissues.
    Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 06/1998; 1397(3):275-84. · 4.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Several overlapping cDNA clones corresponding to the entire coding sequence of the mouse α1(V) collagen gene (Col5a1) were isolated. The conceptual amino acid translation indicated a high degree of sequence identity (94%) with the human α1(V) chain. All of the important structures previously noted in the human α1(V) chain were also conserved in the mouse chain. The α1(V) transcripts were easily detected in mouse embryos as early as 11 days post coitum (d.p.c.). The transcripts were widely distributed in non-cartilaginous and cartilaginous tissues. Finally, we calculated the ratio of transcripts of α1(V):α2(V):α1(XI) in the calvaria and tongue of 18 d.p.c. embryos using the competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique. The results raised the possibility that there are at least two different kind of types V/XI collagen heterotrimers in mouse embryonic tissues.
    Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Gene Structure and Expression. 01/1998;
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    ABSTRACT: Type XIX collagen is a newly discovered member of the FACIT (fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices) group of extracellular matrix proteins. Based on the primary structure, type XIX collagen is thought to act as a cross-bridge between fibrils and other extracellular matrix molecules. Here we describe the complete exon/intron organization of COL19A1 and show that it contains 51 exons, spanning more than 250 kb of genomic DNA. The comparison of exon structures of COL19A1 and other FACIT family genes revealed several similarities among these genes. The structure of exons encoding the noncollagenous (NC) 1-collagenous (COL) 1-NC 2-COL 2-NC 3-COL 3-NC 4 domain of the alpha1(XIX) chain is similar to that of the NC 1-COL 1-NC 2-COL 3-NC 3 domain of the alpha2(IX) chain except for the NC 3 domain of alpha1(XIX). The exons encoding the COL 5-NC 6 domain of alpha1(XIX) are also similar to those of the COL 3-NC 4 domain of alpha1(IX) chain. Previously, COL19A1 was mapped to human chromosome 6q12-q14, where COL9A1 is also located. Likewise, the present work shows that the mouse Col19a1 gene is located on mouse chromosome 1, region A3, where Col9a1 has also been mapped. Taken together, the data suggest that COL19A1 and COL9A1 (Col19a1 and Col9a1) were duplicated from the same ancestor gene of the FACIT family. Three CA repeat markers with high heterozygosity were found in COL19A1. These markers may be useful for linkage analysis of age-related inheritable diseases involved in eyes and/or brain.
    Genomics 11/1997; 45(2):304-12. · 3.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Type XIX collagen is a poorly characterized member of the fibril-associated collagens with an interrupted triple helices (FACIT) class of collagen molecules. As a first step toward elucidating its function, we have isolated full size cDNA clones from the mouse alpha1(XIX) collagen gene (Col19a1) and established its pattern of expression in the developing embryo and adult organism. Col19a1 transcripts can be detected as early as 11 days of gestation and in all embryonic tissues, except the liver, of an 18-day postcoitum mouse. In contrast, only a few adult tissues, brain, eye, and testis, seem to accumulate Col19a1 mRNA. Col19a1 transcripts are at least 10 times more abundant in adult than fetal brain and significantly less in adult than fetal muscle and skin. Consistent with the RNA data, polyclonal antibodies for alpha1(XIX) collagen reacted with a 150-kDa protein in the neutral salt extraction of adult mouse brain tissues. We therefore propose that type XIX collagen plays a distinct role from the other FACIT molecules, particularly in the assembly of embryonic matrices and in the maintenance of specific adult tissues.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 08/1997; 272(27):17104-11. · 4.65 Impact Factor
  • Matrix Biology 01/1996; 15(3):164-164. · 3.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fibrillar networks are intimately involved in several morphogenetic processes which underlie the harmonious development of the vertebrate embryo. Recent genetic evidence has demonstrated that the minor types V and XI collagen are key regulators of types I and II fibrillogenesis in non-cartilaginous and cartilaginous matrices, respectively. A comprehensive understanding of the expression and regulation of the genes coding for the chains of the minor collagen types is therefore relevant to animal morphogenesis and development. The present study was undertaken to elucidate the embryonic pattern of expression of the gene coding for the mouse α1 chain of type XI colagen (Col11α1) using the technique of in situ hybridization. Transcripts of the Col11α1 gene were detected as early as 11 days of gestation. The α1(XI) transcripts were found to accumulate mostly in cartilaginous tissues, such as the chondrocranium and the developing limbs. Like the major cartilage-specific collagen (type II), Col11α1 expression was also noted in the neuro-epithelium of the brain. However, α1(XI) transcripts accumulated in several other non-cartilaginous sites. They include odontoblasts, trabecular bones, atrioventricular valve of the heart, the tongue, the intestine, and the otic vesicle. Altogether, the data confirm that Col11α1 has a broader spectrum of expression than previously thought. This finding raises the possibility that the α1(XI) chain may participate in the formation of stage- and tissue-specific trimers with distinct functional properties. © 1995 wiley-Liss, Inc.
    Developmental Dynamics 08/1995; 204(1):41 - 47. · 2.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Several overlapping cDNA clones corresponding to the entire coding sequence of the mouse alpha 1(XI) collagen gene (Col11 a1) were isolated. The conceptual amino acid translation indicated a high degree of sequence identity (93%) with the human alpha 1(XI) chain. The cloning experiments also revealed alternative splicing of the sequence coding for 85 residues located within the acidic region of the amino-globular domain of alpha 1(XI). Analysis of RNA samples from different embryonic tissues suggested that alternative splicing might be confined to tissue destined to become bone.
    Genomics 08/1995; 28(2):337-40. · 3.01 Impact Factor
  • K Inoguchi, H Yoshioka, M Khaleduzzaman, Y Ninomiya
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    ABSTRACT: We have isolated cDNAs and completed for the first time the primary structure for a novel collagenous chain that was partially characterized earlier and named alpha 1(Y) chain [Yoshioka, H. et al. (1992) Genomics 13, 884-886]. The size of the coding region was unexpectedly small compared with the length of the mRNA (> 10 kb), owing to the presence of a long 3' untranslated region (> 5 kb). The predicted polypeptide contained 1,142 amino acid residues with a 23-residue signal peptide consisting of 5 collagenous domains of 70-224 residues in length, interspersed and flanked with 6 noncollagenous (NC) domains. The primary structure is distinct from those of the 32 known collagen alpha-chains of types I through XVIII. Therefore, we designate this newly discovered collagen chain the alpha 1 chain of type XIX collagen. Sequence analysis suggested that this chain belongs to the recently discovered group of collagens known as FACITs (fibril associated collagens with interrupted triple-helices). Northern blotting analysis demonstrated hybridization of the cDNA to a large mRNA species (> 10 kb) extracted from a rhabdomyosarcoma cell line (CCL 136). We also isolated numerous truncated cDNA clones of which the 3' parts were different from the "proto" type of the mRNA of > 10-kb size. Sequence comparison between cDNAs and corresponding genomic DNA fragments indicated that unusual splicing events occurred through insufficient recognition at acceptor sites. Expression of the gene was extremely infrequent in the rhabdomyosarcoma cell line; it could be restricted to certain animal tissues both temporally and spatially during early development.
    Journal of Biochemistry 01/1995; 117(1):137-46. · 3.07 Impact Factor
  • Matrix Biology. 09/1994; 14(5):365.