Lindsey Lesher

University of Minnesota Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN, United States

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Publications (5)20.93 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a community pathogen. Community-associated (CA) MRSA infections have occurred among multiple members of a household. We describe the incidence of and risk factors for MRSA colonization among household contacts of children with CA-MRSA infections. MRSA-infected children <18 years of age who lacked established healthcare-associated MRSA risk factors were identified through surveillance at 12 Minnesota hospital laboratories. Nasal swab specimens and information on medical history and hygiene behaviors were collected from case-patients and enrolled household contacts during home visits. S. aureus isolates obtained from nasal cultures were screened for oxacillin resistance. In all, 236 households consisting of 236 case-patients and 712 household contacts were enrolled. Home visits were conducted on an average of 69 days after the onset of symptom in case-patients (range: 16-178 days). Twenty-nine (13%) case-patients and 82 (12%) household contacts had MRSA nasal colonization. Nasal MRSA colonization in ≥ 1 household contact occurred in 58 (25%) households. Household contacts who assisted the case-patient to bathe or who shared balms/ointments/lotion with the case-patient were more likely to be colonized (P < 0.01, P < 0.05), whereas those who reported using antibacterial versus nonantibacterial soap for hand washing were less likely to be colonized (P < 0.05) with MRSA clonally related to the case-patient infection isolate. Only 13% of case-patients had MRSA nasal colonization on an average of 69 days after their initial MRSA infection. CA-MRSA colonization may be short-lived or may occur at non-nasal sites. One quarter of households had at least one household contact colonized with MRSA. Modifiable behaviors, such as sharing personal items, may contribute to transmission.
    The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal 05/2011; 30(11):927-32. · 3.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study is to determine the costs per hospital admission of screening intensive care unit patients for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and isolating those who are colonized. Data on the costs of the intervention come from the Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, a 279-bed teaching hospital and outpatient facility. A microcosting approach is used to determine the intervention costs for 3 different laboratory testing protocols. The costs of caring for MRSA-infected patients come from the experience of 241 Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center patients with MRSA infections in 2004 through 2006. The effectiveness of the intervention comes from the extant literature. To capture the effect of screening on reducing transmission of MRSA to other patients and its effect on costs, a Markov simulation model was employed. The intervention was cost saving compared with no intervention for all 3 laboratory processes evaluated and for all of the 1-way sensitivity analyses considered. Because of the high cost of caring for a MRSA patient, interventions that reduce the spread of infections-such as screening intensive care unit patients upon admission studied here-are likely to pay for themselves.
    American journal of infection control 02/2011; 39(1):27-34. · 3.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Circulating strains of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) have changed in the last 30 years including the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant SA (MRSA). A report suggested staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome (TSS) was increasing over 2000-2003. The last population-based assessment of TSS was 1986. Population-based active surveillance for TSS meeting the CDC definition using ICD-9 codes was conducted in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area (population 2,642,056) from 2000-2006. Medical records of potential cases were reviewed for case criteria, antimicrobial susceptibility, risk factors, and outcome. Superantigen PCR testing and PFGE were performed on available isolates from probable and confirmed cases. Of 7,491 hospitalizations that received one of the ICD-9 study codes, 61 TSS cases (33 menstrual, 28 non-menstrual) were identified. The average annual incidence per 100,000 of all, menstrual, and non-menstrual TSS was 0.52 (95% CI, 0.32-0.77), 0.69 (0.39-1.16), and 0.32 (0.12-0.67), respectively. Women 13-24 years had the highest incidence at 1.41 (0.63-2.61). No increase in incidence was observed from 2000-2006. MRSA was isolated in 1 menstrual and 3 non-menstrual cases (7% of TSS cases); 1 isolate was USA400. The superantigen gene tst-1 was identified in 20 (80%) of isolates and was more common in menstrual compared to non-menstrual isolates (89% vs. 50%, p = 0.07). Superantigen genes sea, seb and sec were found more frequently among non-menstrual compared to menstrual isolates [100% vs 25% (p = 0.4), 60% vs 0% (p<0.01), and 25% vs 13% (p = 0.5), respectively]. TSS incidence remained stable across our surveillance period of 2000-2006 and compared to past population-based estimates in the 1980s. MRSA accounted for a small percentage of TSS cases. tst-1 continues to be the superantigen associated with the majority of menstrual cases. The CDC case definition identifies the most severe cases and has been consistently used but likely results in a substantial underestimation of the total TSS disease burden.
    PLoS ONE 01/2011; 6(8):e22997. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine differences in healthcare costs between cases of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) infection and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infection in adults. Retrospective study of all cases of S. aureus infection. Department of Veterans Affairs hospital and associated clinics. There were 390 patients with MSSA infections and 335 patients with MRSA infections. We used medical records, accounting systems, and interviews to identify services rendered and costs for Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center patients with S. aureus infection with onset during the period from January 1, 2004, through June 30, 2006. We used regression analysis to adjust for patient characteristics. Median 6-month unadjusted costs for patients infected with MRSA were $34,657, compared with $15,923 for patients infected with MSSA. Patients with MRSA infection had more comorbidities than patients with MSSA infection (mean Charlson index 4.3 vs 3.2; P < .001). For patients with Charlson indices of 3 or less, mean adjusted 6-month costs derived from multivariate analysis were $51,252 (95% CI, $46,041-$56,464) for MRSA infection and $30,158 (95% CI, $27,092-$33,225) for MSSA infection. For patients with Charlson indices of 4 or more, mean adjusted costs were $84,436 (95% CI, $79,843-$89,029) for MRSA infection and $59,245 (95% CI, $56,016-$62,473) for MSSA infection. Patients with MRSA infection were also more likely to die than were patients with MSSA infection (23.6% vs 11.5%; P < .001). MRSA infection was more likely to involve the lungs, bloodstream, and urinary tract, while MSSA infection was more likely to involve bones or joints; eyes, ears, nose, or throat; surgical sites; and skin or soft tissue (P < .001). Resistance to methicillin in S. aureus was independently associated with increased costs. Effective antimicrobial stewardship and infection prevention programs are needed to prevent these costly infections.
    Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology 02/2010; 31(4):365-73. · 4.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We compared passive surveillance and International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, codes for completeness of staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome (TSS) surveillance in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area, Minnesota, USA. TSS-specific codes identified 55% of cases compared with 30% by passive surveillance and were more sensitive (p = 0.0005, McNemar chi2 12.25).
    Emerging Infectious Diseases 06/2009; 15(5):770-3. · 6.79 Impact Factor