L C Harrell

Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States

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Publications (27)164.68 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: A consecutive series of interventions in vessels with reference diameter < or = 2.75 mm was retrospectively analyzed according to preprocedure strategy: balloon angioplasty with provisional stenting (PTCA group, 73 patients) and primary stenting (PS group, 122 patients). In the PS group, there were more patients with single-vessel disease (54.1% vs. 37.0%; P = 0.021), less patients with three-vessel disease (9.0% vs. 24.7%; P = 0.003), more LAD interventions (54.9% vs. 31.5; P = 0.002), and less left circumflex interventions (22.1% vs. 45.2%; P < 0.001). Reference diameter was larger in the PS group (2.28 +/- 0.35 mm vs. 2.11 +/- 0.36 mm; P = 0.001). Provisional stenting was performed in 39.7% of PTCA group. At long-term outcome, the incidence of composite major events was similar between the PTCA and the PS groups (20.5% vs. 17.2%, respectively; P = NS). Treatment of small vessels with balloon dilatation and provisional stenting or with primary stenting yielded similar late outcomes. Operators' choice of treatment strategy was based on particular angiographic characteristics.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 04/2002; 55(3):309-14. · 2.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Percutaneous mitral balloon valvuloplasty (PMV) results in good immediate results, particularly in patients with echocardiographic scores (Echo-Sc) < or =8. However, which variables relate to long-term outcome is unclear. We report the immediate and long-term clinical follow-up (mean, 4.2+/-3.7 years; range, 0.5 to 15) of 879 patients who underwent 939 PMV procedures. Patients were divided into 2 groups, Echo-Sc < or =8 (n=601) and Echo-Sc >8 (n=278). PMV resulted in an increase in mitral valve area from 1.0+/-0.3 to 2.0+/-0.6 cm2 in patients with Echo-Sc < or =8 and from 0.8+/-0.3 to 1.6+/-0.6 cm2 in patients with Echo-Sc >8 (P<0.0001). Although adverse events (death, mitral valve surgery, and redo PMV) were low within the first 5 years of follow-up, a progressive number of events occurred beyond this period. Nevertheless, survival (82% versus 57%) and event-free survival (38% versus 22%) at 12-year follow-up was greater in patients with Echo-Sc < or =8 (P<0.0001). Cox regression analysis identified post-PMV mitral regurgitation > or =3+, Echo-Sc >8, age, prior surgical commissurotomy, NYHA functional class IV, pre-PMV mitral regurgitation > or =2+, and higher post-PMV pulmonary artery pressure as independent predictors of combined events at long-term follow-up. The immediate and long-term outcome of patients undergoing PMV is multifactorial. The use of the Echo-Sc in conjunction with other clinical and morphological predictors of PMV outcome allows identification of patients who will obtain the best outcome from PMV.
    Circulation 04/2002; 105(12):1465-71. · 15.20 Impact Factor
  • ACC Current Journal Review 01/2002; 11(5):60–61.
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    ABSTRACT: There is controversy as to whether the double-balloon or the Inoue technique of percutaneous mitral balloon valvuloplasty (PMBV) provides superior immediate and long-term results. This study was undertaken to analyze the effect of the learning curve of the Inoue technique of PMBV in the immediate and long-term outcome of PMBV. The learning curve of Inoue PMBV was analyzed in 233 Inoue PMBVs divided into 2 groups: "early experience" (n = 100) and "late experience" (n = 133). The results of the overall Inoue technique were compared with those of 659 PMBVs performed with the double-balloon technique. Baseline clinical and morphologic characteristics between early and late experience Inoue groups were similar. Post-PMBV mitral valve area (1.89 +/- 0.56 vs 1.69 +/- 0.57 cm(2); p = 0.008) and success rate (60% vs 75.9%; p = 0.009) were significantly higher in the late experience Inoue group. Furthermore, there was a trend for less incidence of severe post-PMBV mitral regurgitation > or = 3+ in the late experience group (6.8% vs 12%; p = 0.16). Although the post-PMBV mitral valve area was larger with the double-balloon technique (1.94 +/- 0.72 vs 1.81 +/- 0.58 cm(2); p = 0.01), the success rate (71.3% vs 69.1%; p = NS), incidence of > or = 3+ mitral regurgitation (9% vs 9%), in-hospital complications, and long-term and event-free survival were similar with both techniques. In conclusion, there is a significant learning curve of the Inoue technique of PMBV. Both the Inoue and the double-balloon techniques are equally effective techniques of PMBV because they resulted in similar immediate success, in-hospital adverse events, and long-term and event-free survival.
    The American Journal of Cardiology 09/2001; 88(6):662-7. · 3.21 Impact Factor
  • The American Journal of Cardiology 08/2001; 88(1):A7, 71-3. · 3.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with renal failure undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) experience reduced procedural success rates and increased in-hospital and long-term follow-up major adverse cardiac events. This study was designed to determine whether the severity of preprocedural renal failure influences the outcomes of patients with renal failure undergoing PCI. We compared the immediate and long-term outcomes of 192 patients with mild renal failure (creatinine 1.6 to 2.0 mg/dl, mean 1.76) with those of 131 patients with severe renal failure (creatinine >2.0 mg/dl, mean 2.90), selected from 3,334 consecutive patients undergoing PCI between 1994 and 1997. Although the overall population with renal failure represents a high-risk group, the severe renal failure cohort had a higher incidence of hypertension, multivessel disease, prior coronary bypass surgery, vascular disease, and congestive heart failure (all p values <0.05), yet had similar angiographic characteristics. Procedural success was higher in the group with severe renal failure (93.7% vs 87.7%, p = 0.04). There were no statistically significant differences in in-hospital mortality (11.5% vs 9.9%, p = 0.7), Q-wave myocardial infarction (0.5% vs 0%, p = 0.4), emergent bypass surgery (0% vs 0%, p = 1.0), and in-hospital major adverse cardiac events (11.5% vs 9.9%, p = 0.7) between the mild and severe renal groups, respectively. Kaplan-Meier analyses showed no statistically significant difference in long-term survival (log rank test, p = 0.1) or event-free survival (log rank test, p = 0.3) between the 2 groups. Finally, creatinine was not identified as an independent predictor of in-hospital or long-term follow-up major adverse cardiac events. In our high-risk population, patients with mild renal insufficiency undergoing PCI experience major adverse outcomes in the hospital and at long-term follow-up similar to those of patients with severe renal failure.
    The American Journal of Cardiology 04/2001; 87(7):856-60. · 3.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing conventional balloon angioplasty have reduced procedural success and increased complication rates. This study was designed to determine the immediate and long-term outcomes of patients with varying degrees of renal failure undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention in the current device era. We compared the immediate and long-term outcomes of 362 renal failure patients (creatinine >1.5 mg/dL) with those of 2972 patients with normal renal function who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention between 1994 and 1997. Patients with renal failure were older and had more associated comorbidities. They had reduced procedural success (89.5% versus 92.9%, P:=0.007) and greater in-hospital combined major event (death, Q-wave myocardial infarction, emergent CABG; 10.8% versus 1.8%; P:<0.0001) rates. Renal failure was an independent predictor of major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) (OR, 3.41; 95% CI, 1.84 to 6.22; P:<0.00001). Logistic regression analysis identified shock, peripheral vascular disease, balloon angioplasty strategy, and unstable angina as independent predictors of in-hospital MACEs in the renal group. Compared with 362 age- and sex-matched patients selected from the control group, patients with renal failure had a lower survival rate (27.7% versus 6.1%, P:<0.0001) and a greater MACE rate (51% versus 33%, P:<0.001) at long-term follow-up. Cox regression analysis identified age and PTCA strategy as independent predictors of long-term MACEs in the renal group. Finally, within the renal failure population, the dialysis and nondialysis patients experienced remarkably similar immediate and long-term outcomes. Although patients with renal failure can be treated with a high procedural success rate in the new device era, they have an increased rate of major events both in hospital and at long-term follow-up. Nevertheless, utilization of stenting and debulking techniques improves immediate and long-term outcomes.
    Circulation 12/2000; 102(24):2966-72. · 15.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Traditionally, procedural risks associated with conventional balloon coronary angioplasty have been largely attributed to unfavorable lesion morphology. However, factors predicting adverse events in the current practice of percutaneous coronary revascularization are unclear. The present study was undertaken to determine factors predicting major adverse events (death or Q-wave myocardial infarction or emergency bypass surgery) in 3,335 consecutive patients undergoing percutaneous coronary revascularization in the current practice of percutaneous coronary revascularization. During the period of observation, the rate of lesions treated successfully increased from 91% to 95% (P < 0.0001), whereas the rate of major adverse events (MACE) decreased from 3.6% to 1.6% (odds ratio [OR], 0.70 per year). Using multiple stepwise logistic regression analysis, cardiogenic shock (OR, 8.59; confidence interval [CI], 4.27-17.27), renal disease (OR, 3.33; CI, 1.95-5.69), evolving myocardial infarction (OR, 2.80; CI, 1.47-5.31), congestive heart failure (OR, 2.18; CI, 1.23-3.86), total number of lesions treated (OR, 1.28; CI, 1.03-1.59), age (OR, 1.03; CI, 1.01-1.06), and history of prior coronary intervention (OR, 0.51; CI 0.26-0.99) were identified as independent predictors of MACE. In addition, vascular disease (OR, 2. 48; CI 1.37-4.50) and unstable angina pectoris (OR, 0.44; CI 0.25-0. 79) were related to adverse events when patients in cardiogenic shock were excluded from the model. With the exception of most unfavorable lesion morphology (AHA/ACC lesion type C; OR, 2.05; CI, 1.19-3.52), anatomic parameters added no further information. In the present era of device technology, success rates of percutaneous coronary revascularization procedures have increased and remain to be determined by lesion morphology. In contrast, the rate of MACE is declining and best predicted by easily identified patient characteristics.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 12/1999; 48(3):253-60. · 2.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of atrial fibrillation (AF) on the immediate and long-term outcome of patients undergoing percutaneous mitral balloon valvuloplasty (PMV). There is controversy as to whether the presence of AF has a direct negative effect on the outcome after PMV. The immediate procedural and the long-term clinical outcome after PMV of 355 patients with AF were prospectively collected and compared with those of 379 patients in normal sinus rhythm (NSR). Patients with AF were older (62 +/- 12 vs. 48 +/- 14 years; p < 0.0001) and presented more frequently with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class IV (18.3% vs. 7.9%; p < 0.0001), echocardiographic score >8 (40.1% vs. 25.1%; p < 0.0001), calcified valves under fluoroscopy (32.4% vs. 18.8%, p < 0.0001) and with history of previous surgical commissurotomy (21.7% vs. 16.4%; p = 0.0002). In patients with AF, PMV resulted in inferior immediate and long-term outcomes, as reflected in a smaller post-PMV mitral valve area (1.7 +/- 0.7 vs. 2 +/- 0.7 cm2; p < 0.0001) and a lower event free survival (freedom of death, redo-PMV and mitral valve surgery) at a mean follow-up time of 60 months (32% vs. 61%; p < 0.0001). In the group of patients in AF, severe post-PMV mitral regurgitation (> or =3+) (p = 0.0001), echocardiographic score >8 (p = 0.004) and pre-PMV NYHA class IV (p = 0.046) were identified as independent predictors of combined events at follow-up. Patients with AF have a worse immediate and long-term outcomes after PMV. However, the presence of AF by itself does not unfavorably influence the outcome, but is a marker for clinical and morphologic features associated with inferior results after PMV.
    Journal of the American College of Cardiology 11/1999; 34(4):1145-52. · 14.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to determine whether small reference diameter of the culprit coronary artery influences the outcome of an attempted percutaneous revascularization procedure in the current era of interventional cardiology. Although the interventional strategy is largely determined by the size of the culprit coronary artery, earlier quantitative studies have not shown a worse acute outcome for small reference vessel diameter (< or =2.5 mm). A total of 2,306 patients undergoing percutaneous coronary revascularization was divided in groups with reference diameters < or =2.5 mm (n = 813) or >2.5 mm (n = 1,493). Success and in-hospital major adverse cardiac event (death, Q-wave myocardial infarction and emergency coronary artery bypass graft) rates between both groups were compared. Patients with lesions in small vessels were older and presented more frequently with female gender, diabetes mellitus, heart failure, peripheral vascular, multivessel coronary disease and American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology (AHA/ACC) lesion type C (p < or = 0.01, each). Further, utilization of interventional devices differed markedly. In contrast to stents (18.5% vs. 41.9%) and directional atherectomy (3.7% vs. 13.5%), conventional balloon angioplasty (73% vs. 50%) and rotational atherectomy (16.1% vs. 8.3%) were used more often in smaller vessels (p < or = 0.0001, each). Success rate was lower in the small vessel group (92% vs. 95%; p = 0.006). Major adverse cardiac events occurred more frequently in small than large vessels (univariate 3.4% vs. 2.0%, p = 0.03; multivariate odds ratio 2.1, p = 0.02), particularly when proximal coronary segments were compared. Lesions in vessels with small reference diameter represent a distinct group with respect to clinical and morphologic characteristics as well as device utilization. These lesions have lower chances of successful percutaneous intervention and carry relatively higher risks, specifically when located in proximal coronary segments.
    Journal of the American College of Cardiology 08/1999; 34(1):40-8. · 14.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to assess the immediate and long-term outcome of repeat percutaneous mitral balloon valvuloplasty (PMV) for post-PMV mitral restenosis. Symptomatic mitral restenosis develop in 7% to 21% of patients after PMV. Currently, most of these patients are referred for mitral valve replacement. However, it is unknown if these patients may benefit from repeat PMV. We report the immediate outcome and long-term clinical follow-up results of 36 patients (mean age 58+/-13 years, 75% women) with symptomatic mitral restenosis after prior PMV, who were treated with a repeat PMV at 34.6+/-28 months after the initial PMV. The mean follow-up period was 30+/-33 months with a maximal follow-up of 10 years. An immediate procedural success was obtained in 75% patients. The overall survival rate was 74%, 72% and 71% at one, two, and three years respectively. The event-free survival rate was 61%, 54% and 47% at one, two, and three years respectively. In the presence of comorbid diseases (cardiac and noncardiac) the two-year event-free survival was reduced to 29% as compared with 86% in patients without comorbid diseases. Cox regression analysis identified the echocardiographic score (p = 0.03), post-PMV mitral valve area (p = 0.003), post-PMV mitral regurgitation grade (p = 0.02) and post-PMV pulmonary artery pressure (p = 0.0001) as independent predictors of event-free survival after repeat PMV. Repeat PMV for post-PMV mitral restenosis results in good immediate and long-term outcome in patients with low echocardiographic scores and absence of comorbid diseases. Although the results are less favorable in patients with suboptimal characteristics, repeat PMV has a palliative role if the patients are not surgical candidates.
    Journal of the American College of Cardiology 08/1999; 34(1):49-54. · 14.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is controversy as to whether the double-balloon or Inoue technique of percutaneous mitral balloon valvotomy (PMBV) provides superior immediate and long-term results. This study compares the immediate procedural and long-term outcomes of patients undergoing PMBV using the double-balloon versus the Inoue techniques. Seven hundred thirty-four consecutive patients who underwent PMBV using the double-balloon (n = 621) or Inoue technique (n = 113) were studied. There were no statistically significant differences in baseline clinical and morphologic characteristics between the double-balloon and Inoue patients. The double-balloon technique resulted in superior immediate outcome, as reflected in a larger post-PMBV mitral valve area (1.9 +/- 0.7 vs 1.7 +/- 0.6 cm2; p = 0.005) and a lower incidence of 3+ mitral regurgitation after PMBV (5.4% vs 10.6%; p = 0.05). This superior immediate outcome of the double-balloon technique was observed only in the group of patients with echocardiographic score < or = 8 (post-PMBV mitral valve areas 2.1 +/- 0.7 vs 1.8 +/- 0.6; p = 0.004). Despite the difference in immediate outcome, there were no significant differences in event-free survival at long-term follow-up between the 2 techniques. Our study demonstrates that compared with the Inoue technique, the double-balloon technique results in a larger mitral valve area and less degree of severe mitral regurgitation after PMBV. Despite the difference in immediate outcome between both techniques, there were no significant differences in event-free survival at long-term follow-up.
    The American Journal of Cardiology 05/1999; 83(9):1356-63. · 3.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is controversy as to whether the double-balloon or Inoue technique of percutaneous mitral balloon valvotomy (PMBV) provides superior immediate and long-term results. This study compares the immediate procedural and long-term outcomes of patients undergoing PMBV using the double-balloon versus the Inoue techniques. Seven hundred thirty-four consecutive patients who underwent PMBV using the double-balloon (n = 621) or Inoue technique (n = 113) were studied. There were no statistically significant differences in baseline clinical and morphologic characteristics between the double-balloon and Inoue patients. The double-balloon technique resulted in superior immediate outcome, as reflected in a larger post-PMBV mitral valve area (1.9 ± 0.7 vs 1.7 ± 0.6 cm2; p = 0.005) and a lower incidence of 3+ mitral regurgitation after PMBV (5.4% vs 10.6%; p = 0.05). This superior immediate outcome of the double-balloon technique was observed only in the group of patients with echocardiographic score ≤8 (post-PMBV mitral valve areas 2.1 ± 0.7 vs 1.8 ± 0.6; p = 0.004). Despite the difference in immediate outcome, there were no significant differences in event-free survival at long-term follow-up between the 2 techniques. Our study demonstrates that compared with the Inoue technique, the double-balloon technique results in a larger mitral valve area and less degree of severe mitral regurgitation after PMBV. Despite the difference in immediate outcome between both techniques, there were no significant differences in event-free survival at long-term follow-up.
    The American Journal of Cardiology. 01/1999;
  • Journal of the American College of Cardiology 01/1999; 34(4). · 14.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Management of in-stent restenosis has become a significant challenge in interventional cardiology. The results of balloon angioplasty have been disappointing due to the high recurrence of restenosis at follow-up. Debulking of the restenotic tissue within the stents using directional coronary atherectomy (DCA) may offer a therapeutic advantage. We report the immediate clinical and angiographic outcomes and long-term clinical follow-up results of 45 patients (46 lesions), mean age 63+/-12 years, 73% men, with a mean reference diameter of 2.9+/-0.6 mm, treated with DCA for symptomatic Palmaz-Schatz in-stent restenosis. DCA was performed successfully in all 46 lesions and resulted in a postprocedural minimal luminal diameter of 2.7+/-0.7 mm and a residual diameter stenosis of 17+/-10%. There were no in-hospital deaths, Q-wave myocardial infarctions, or emergency coronary artery bypass surgeries. Four patients (9%) suffered a non-Q-wave myocardial infarction. Target lesion revascularization was 28.3% at a mean follow-up of 10+/-4.6 months. Kaplan-Meier event-free survival (freedom from death, myocardial infarction, and repeat target lesion revascularization) was 71.2% and 64.7% at 6 and 12 months after DCA, respectively. Thus, DCA is safe and efficacious for the treatment of Palmaz-Schatz in-stent restenosis. It results in a large postprocedural minimal luminal diameter and a low rate of both target lesion revascularization and combined major clinical events at follow-up.
    The American Journal of Cardiology 01/1999; 82(11):1345-51. · 3.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Early loss of minimal luminal diameter of >0.3 mm after successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) is associated with a higher incidence of restenosis. The underlying mechanism of this early loss is unknown and thrombus may be a contributing factor. We performed a prospective study using quantitative computerized planimetry on coronary tissue specimens obtained by directional coronary atherectomy of 24 lesions in which early loss occurred 22+/-9 minutes after successful PTCA. Thrombus was present in 9 (37%) of 24 coronary specimens. Segmental areas (mm2) and percentage of total area were distributed as follows: sclerotic tissue, 4.07+/-0.7 mm2 (63%+/-6%); fibrocellular tissue, 0.97+/-0.27 mm2 (16%+/-4%); hypercellular tissue, 0.99+/-0.29 mm2 (12%+/-3%); atheromatous gruel, 0.18+/-0.07 mm2 (3%+/-0.1%); and thrombus, 0.24+/-0.15 mm2 (6%+/-0.4%). There was no difference in the relative early loss index between lesions with or without thrombus (35%+/-7% vs 26%+/-2%, respectively; P= .87). Multiple stepwise regression analysis did not identify any histologic predictors of relative early loss index. Histopathologic analysis of coronary lesions with early loss after successful PTCA suggests that thrombus may not play a significant role in this angiographic phenomenon.
    American Heart Journal 12/1998; 136(5):804-11. · 4.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study sought to compare two strategies of revascularization in patients obtaining a good immediate angiographic result after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA): elective stenting versus optimal PTCA. A good immediate angiographic result with provisional stenting was considered to occur only if early loss in minimal luminal diameter (MLD) was documented at 30 min post-PTCA angiography. Coronary stenting reduces restenosis in lesions exhibiting early deterioration (>0.3 mm) in MLD within the first 24 hours (early loss) after successful PTCA. Lesions with no early loss after PTCA have a low restenosis rate. To compare angiographic restenosis and target vessel revascularization (TVR) of lesions treated with coronary stenting versus those treated with optimal PTCA, 116 patients were randomized to stent (n=57) or to optimal PTCA (n=59). After randomization in the PTCA group, 13.5% of the patients crossed over to stent due to early loss (provisional stenting). Baseline demographic and angiographic characteristics were similar in both groups of patients. At 7.6 months, 96.6% of the entire population had a follow-up angiographic study: 98.2% in the stent and 94.9% in the PTCA group. Immediate and follow-up angiographic data showed that acute gain was significantly higher in the stent than in the PTCA group (1.95 vs. 1.5 mm; p < 0.03). However, late loss was significantly higher in the stent than the PTCA group (0.63+/-0.59 vs. 0.26+/-0.44, respectively; p=0.01). Hence, net gain with both techniques was similar (1.32< or =0.3 vs. 1.24+/-0.29 mm for the stent and the PTCA groups, respectively; p=NS). Angiographic restenosis rate at follow-up (19.2% in stent vs. 16.4% in PTCA; p=NS) and TVR (17.5% in stent vs. 13.5% in PTCA; p=NS) were similar. Furthermore, event-free survival was 80.8% in the stent versus 83.1% in the PTCA group (p=NS). Overall costs (hospital and follow-up) were US $591,740 in the stent versus US $398,480 in the PTCA group (p < 0.02). The strategy of PTCA with delay angiogram and provisional stent if early loss occurs had similar restenosis rate and TVR, but lower cost than primary stenting after PTCA.
    Journal of the American College of Cardiology 11/1998; 32(5):1351-7. · 14.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective. This study sought to compare two strategies of revascularization in patients obtaining a good immediate angiographic result after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA): elective stenting versus optimal PTCA. A good immediate angiographic result with provisional stenting was considered to occur only if early loss in minimal luminal diameter (MLD) was documented at 30 min post-PTCA angiography.Background. Coronary stenting reduces restenosis in lesions exhibiting early deterioration (>0.3 mm) in MLD within the first 24 hours (early loss) after successful PTCA. Lesions with no early loss after PTCA have a low restenosis rate.Methods. To compare angiographic restenosis and target vessel revascularization (TVR) of lesions treated with coronary stenting versus those treated with optimal PTCA, 116 patients were randomized to stent (n = 57) or to optimal PTCA (n = 59). After randomization in the PTCA group, 13.5% of the patients crossed over to stent due to early loss (provisional stenting).Results. Baseline demographic and angiographic characteristics were similar in both groups of patients. At 7.6 months, 96.6% of the entire population had a follow-up angiographic study: 98.2% in the stent and 94.9% in the PTCA group. Immediate and follow-up angiographic data showed that acute gain was significantly higher in the stent than in the PTCA group (1.95 vs. 1.5 mm; p < 0.03). However, late loss was significantly higher in the stent than the PTCA group (0.63 ± 0.59 vs. 0.26 ± 0.44, respectively; p = 0.01). Hence, net gain with both techniques was similar (1.32 ± 0.3 vs. 1.24 ± 0.29 mm for the stent and the PTCA groups, respectively; p = NS). Angiographic restenosis rate at follow-up (19.2% in stent vs. 16.4% in PTCA; p = NS) and TVR (17.5% in stent vs. 13.5% in PTCA; p = NS) were similar. Furthermore, event-free survival was 80.8% in the stent versus 83.1% in the PTCA group (p = NS). Overall costs (hospital and follow-up) were US $591,740 in the stent versus US $398,480 in the PTCA group (p < 0.02).Conclusions. The strategy of PTCA with delay angiogram and provisional stent if early loss occurs had similar restenosis rate and TVR, but lower cost than primary stenting after PTCA.
    Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 11/1998;
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    ABSTRACT: Acute procedural Occlusion continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality associated with coronary interventions. The incidence, management, and clinical outcomes of procedural occlusion of 2,138 patients undergoing coronary intervention were analyzed. The acute occlusion rate increased from 5.2% in 1994 to 8.0% in 1995 (p = 0.001). The success rate for managing such acute procedural occlusion improved significantly from 93% in 1994 to 100% in 1995 (p = 0.003). The composite endpoints of coronary artery bypass surgery, non-fatal myocardial infarction or death decreased from 16.4% in 1994 to 11.4% in 1995 (p = ns). The increased acute procedural occlusion rate in 1995 likely represents a more aggressive approach on more complex lesion types as well as higher total numbers of evolving myocardial infarctions, while the improvement in successful management of acute occlusion probably represents increased utilization of stents, improved and modified procedural technique and better antiplatelet/anticoagulation therapy.
    The Journal of invasive cardiology 06/1998; 10(4):208-212. · 1.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study compares the immediate and long-term outcomes of a primary coronary stenting strategy with primary balloon angioplasty with stent bailout in the treatment of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). One hundred forty-seven consecutive patients who underwent primary balloon angioplasty with stent bailout (n = 94) or primary stenting (n = 53) for AMI were clinically followed for 8.1 +/- 5.7 and 8.5 +/- 4.5 months, respectively. Immediate results, as well as in-hospital and long-term ischemic events (death, reinfarction, and repeat revascularization) were compared between both groups. Angiographic success was 91.5% in the balloon angioplasty group and 94% in the stent group. In-hospital and late follow-up combined ischemic events were 22 of 94 (23%) versus 0 of 53 (0%); p < 0.001 and 33 of 78 (42%) versus 13 of 53 (25%), p = 0.04 for the balloon angioplasty and stent groups, respectively. At 6 months, the cumulative probability of repeat target lesion revascularization was higher in the balloon angioplasty group (47% vs 18%, p = 0.0006) as was the probability of late target revascularization (36% vs 18%, p = 0.046); the cumulative event-free survival after 6 months was significantly lower in the balloon angioplasty group (44% vs 80%, p = 0.0001). This study demonstrates that a primary stent placement strategy in patients with AMI is safe, feasible, and superior to primary balloon angioplasty with stent bailout. Primary stenting results in a larger postprocedural minimal luminal diameter, a lower early and late recurrent ischemic event rate, and a lower incidence of target lesion revascularization at follow-up.
    The American Journal of Cardiology 04/1998; 81(8):957-63. · 3.21 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

623 Citations
164.68 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1997–2001
    • Harvard Medical School
      • Department of Medicine
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 1994–2001
    • Massachusetts General Hospital
      • Department of Medicine
      Boston, MA, United States