Lance K Ching

Infectious Disease Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, United States

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Publications (3)12.73 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Considerable effort has been directed to develop Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccines to boost bacille Calmette-Guérin or for those who cannot be immunized with bacille Calmette-Guérin. We hypothesized that CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses with a heterologous prime/boost vaccine approach could induce long-lived vaccine efficacy against M. tuberculosis in C57BL/6 mice. We produced an adenovirus vector expressing ID93 (Ad5-ID93) for induction of CD8 T cells to use with our candidate tuberculosis vaccine, ID93/glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant (GLA)-stable emulsion (SE), which induces potent Th1 CD4 T cells. Ad5-ID93 generates ID93-specific CD8(+) T cell responses and induces protection against M. tuberculosis. When Ad5-ID93 is administered in a prime-boost strategy with ID93/GLA-SE, both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells are generated and provide protection against M. tuberculosis. In a MHC class I-deficient mouse model, all groups including the Ad5-ID93 group elicited an Ag-specific CD4(+) T cell response and significantly fewer Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells, but were still protected against M. tuberculosis, suggesting that CD4(+) Th1 T cells could compensate for the loss of CD8(+) T cells. Lastly, the order of the heterologous immunizations was critical. Long-lived vaccine protection was observed only when Ad5-ID93 was given as the boost following an ID93/GLA-SE prime. The homologous ID93/GLA-SE prime/boost regimen also induced long-lived protection. One of the correlates of protection between these two approaches was an increase in the total number of ID93-specific IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) T cells 6 mo following the last immunization. Our findings provide insight into the development of vaccines not only for tuberculosis, but other diseases requiring T cell immunity.
    The Journal of Immunology 07/2013; 191(5). DOI:10.4049/jimmunol.1301161 · 5.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An effective protein-based vaccine for tuberculosis will require a safe and effective adjuvant. There are few adjuvants in approved human vaccines, including alum and the oil-in-water-based emulsions MF59 (Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics), AS03 and AS04 (GlaxoSmithKline Biologics), AF03 (Sanofi), and liposomes (Crucell). When used with pure, defined proteins, both alum and emulsion adjuvants are effective at inducing primarily humoral responses. One of the newest adjuvants in approved products is AS04, which combines monophosphoryl lipid A, a TLR-4 agonist, with alum. In this study, we compared two adjuvants: a stable oil-in-water emulsion (SE) and a stable oil-in-water emulsion incorporating glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant, a synthetic TLR-4 agonist (GLA-SE), each together with a recombinant protein, ID93. Both the emulsion SE and GLA-SE adjuvants induce potent cellular responses in combination with ID93 in mice. ID93/SE induced Th2-biased immune responses, whereas ID93/GLA-SE induced multifunctional CD4(+) Th1 cell responses (IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2). The ID93/GLA-SE vaccine candidate induced significant protection in mice and guinea pigs, whereas no protection was observed with ID93/SE, as assessed by reductions in bacterial burden, survival, and pathology. These results highlight the importance of properly formulating subunit vaccines with effective adjuvants for use against tuberculosis.
    The Journal of Immunology 03/2012; 188(5):2189-97. DOI:10.4049/jimmunol.1102696 · 5.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists are currently being examined as adjuvants for vaccines, with several lead candidates now in licensed products or in late-stage clinical development. Guinea pigs are widely used for preclinical testing of drugs and vaccines; however, evaluation of TLR agonists in this model is hindered by the limited availability of immunological tools and reagents. In this study, we validated the use of a branched-chain DNA (bDNA) assay known as the QuantiGene Plex 2.0 Reagent System for measuring innate cytokine and chemokine mRNA levels following TLR stimulation of guinea pig cells. Gene expression for T-helper-1 (Th1) polarizing cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-12) and chemokines (CXCL1, CCL2) was upregulated following ex vivo stimulation of guinea pig splenocytes and whole blood with TLR-4 or TLR-7/8 agonists. These data confirm the utility of the QuantiGene system both as an alternative to RT-PCR for measuring transcript levels and as a high-throughput screening tool for dissecting the immunological response to TLR stimulation in guinea pigs. Overall, the QuantiGene platform is reliable, reproducible, and sensitive. These agonists have the potential to be used as adjuvant components in vaccines against various pathogens.
    Journal of immunological methods 08/2011; 373(1-2):54-62. DOI:10.1016/j.jim.2011.07.021 · 2.01 Impact Factor