Kellie E. Carlyle

Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona, United States

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Publications (13)15.31 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Preventing intimate partner violence (IPV) is a public health priority. An important component of designing prevention programs is developing an understanding of how media portrayals of health issues influence public opinion and policy. To better understand the ways in which media images may be informing our understanding of IPV, this study content analyzed portrayals of IPV in news media articles. Stratified media outlets were used to obtain a representative sample of daily newspapers based on their designated market areas. Researchers created constructed months using weeks from each season across a 2-year period. The first part of the study investigated quantitative differences in the coverage of female and male perpetrators (n = 395) and identified several areas where coverage differed. The second part of the study qualitatively examined coverage of female perpetrators (n = 61) to provide a richer description of such coverage. This study contributes to our understanding of female perpetrators and how these portrayals may contribute to the larger gender symmetry debate surrounding female aggressors. Implications for public health policy and research are discussed.
    Journal of Interpersonal Violence 02/2014; · 1.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Guided largely by an attachment theory perspective, a two-part study was conducted to determine the effects of perceived and self-report parent verbal aggression and responsiveness on young adult children's attachment style and relational satisfaction with parents. In part one, 205 undergraduate students completed an in-person self-administered survey. In part two, mail surveys were sent to 389 parents; 79% of parents returned the surveys. As hypothesized, mothers and fathers of children with a secure attachment style were perceived as significantly lower in verbal aggression and higher in responsiveness than parents of children with nonsecure attachment styles. Further, perceived and self-report parent verbal aggression was negatively related to, and perceived and self-report parent responsiveness was positively related to, young adult children's relational satisfaction with both mothers and fathers. Implications for these and other findings are discussed.
    Journal of Family Communication 04/2009; 9(2):90-106.
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    ABSTRACT: How media portray intimate partner violence (IPV) has implications for public perceptions and social policy. Therefore, to better understand these portrayals, this study content analyzes a nationally representative sample of newspaper coverage of IPV over a two-year-period and compares this coverage to epidemiological data in order to examine the implications of the discrepancies between coverage and social reality. Stratified media outlets across the country were used to obtain a representative sample of daily newspapers based on their designated market areas, resulting in 395 IPV-related articles. Results show that newspaper framing of IPV tends to be heavily skewed toward episodic framing. In addition, there are significant differences between our data and epidemiological estimates, particularly in the coverage of homicide and use of alcohol and illegal drugs, which may skew public perceptions of risk. Implications for public perceptions and social policy are discussed.
    Journal of Communication 03/2008; 58(1):168-186. · 2.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A computer- and Internet-based intervention was designed to influence several variables related to the prevention of pregnancy, STDs, and HIV in rural adolescents. Three-hundred and thirty-eight tenth-graders enrolled in two rural public high schools participated in this field experiment. Results indicate that students in the experimental school had greater knowledge, greater condom negotiation efficacy, greater situational efficacy, and more favorable attitudes toward waiting to have sex than students in the control school. In tandem, the results suggest that computer-based programs may be a cost-effective and easily replicable means of providing teens with basic information and skills necessary to prevent pregnancy, STDs, and HIV.
    Communication Quarterly 02/2008; 56(1):29-48.
  • Kellie E Carlyle, Kenneth J Steinman
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    ABSTRACT: Despite a large literature on bullying, few studies simultaneously examine different dimensions of the phenomenon or consider how they vary by demographic characteristics. As a result, research findings in this area have been inconsistent. This article focuses on 2 dimensions of bullying behaviors--aggression and victimization--and examines demographic variation in their prevalence, co-occurrence, and association with other health outcomes. School-based surveys were administered to a census of 6th-12th graders in 16 school districts across a large metropolitan area in the United States (n = 79,492). A 2-factor scale assessed repeated experiences with bullying aggression and victimization. Both dimensions of bullying tended to be more common among younger, male, African American and Native American students. There were, however, several exceptions as well as considerable variation in the magnitude of demographic differences. Most youth involved with bullying were either perpetrators or victims, but not both. For example, only 7.4% of all youths were classified as bully/victims. Substance use was more strongly associated with aggression, whereas depressive affect was more strongly associated with victimization. Researchers should distinguish different dimensions of bullying and consider how they vary by demographic characteristics. In particular, repeated aggression and victimization largely involve different students and may require distinct approaches to prevention.
    Journal of School Health 12/2007; 77(9):623-9. · 1.50 Impact Factor
  • Kellie E. Carlyle, Anthony J. Roberto
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    ABSTRACT: This research examines the relationships between communication competence, communication anxiety, and five subdimensions of counseling self-efficacy. The sample consists of volunteers trained at two rape crisis centers (n = 63) over a one-year period. As hypothesized, communication anxiety was negatively related and communication competence positively related to the subdimensions of counseling self-efficacy. Results suggest that training programs need to be aware of how personality characteristics may affect a volunteer's ability to become an efficacious counselor. Implications for how rape crisis centers can integrate these communication issues into their training programs and improve the self-efficacy of their advocates are discussed.
    Communication Research Reports. 08/2007; 24(3):185-193.
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    ABSTRACT: A two-part study was conducted to determine the relationship between parents' use of verbal aggression and physical aggression (i.e., corporal punishment). In part one, 207 undergraduate students filled out a survey rating their mother's and father's verbal aggression and use of corporal punishment. In part two, mail surveys measuring verbal aggression and corporal punishment were sent to 389 parents; 79% of parents returned the surveys. As hypothesized, there were a significant positive relationships between perceived parent verbal aggression and corporal punishment, as well as between self-report parent verbal aggression and corporal punishment. Additional research questions are tested, and results and implications are discussed.
    Communication Research Reports 05/2007; 24(2):103-111.
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    ABSTRACT: A computer-based intervention was designed to change perceived threat, perceived efficacy, attitudes, and knowledge regarding pregnancy, STD, and HIV prevention in rural adolescents. The intervention, which was guided largely by the extended parallel process model (Witte, 1992), was implemented and evaluated in nine rural high schools using an institutional cycle pretest-posttest control-group design (Campbell & Stanley, 1963; Cook & Campbell, 1979). Eight-hundred eighty-seven ninth-graders completed the survey at both points in time. Process evaluation results indicated that the intervention was implemented as intended, and that over 91% of students in the treatment group completed at least one of the six computer-based activities (M = 3.46, SD = 1.44 for those doing at least one activity). Two-way mixed-model repeated-measures analysis of variance revealed that students in the treatment group outperformed students in the control group on knowledge, condom self-efficacy, attitude toward waiting to have sex, and perceived susceptibility to HIV. These results suggest that computer-based programs may be a cost-effective and easily replicable means of providing teens with basic information and skills necessary to prevent pregnancy, STDs, and HIV.
    Health Communication 02/2007; 21(2):115-24. · 0.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study was designed to test the effects of favor and apology on compliance and to explain any potential effect via indebtedness, gratitude, and liking. Two experiments were devised to accomplish these ends. In the first experiment favor and apology were varied in the absence of a transgression to see if apologizing for not providing a favor can be used proactively to increase compliance. In the second experiment favor and apology were varied in a more common scenario, following a transgression. Results show that favor has a positive effect on compliance mediated by gratitude when using a general prosocial request and by liking when using a more altruistic request. Results also suggest that apology has a positive effect on liking and that apology has an indirect effect on compliance under certain conditions.
    Communication Research 01/2007; 34(6):575-595. · 2.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A computer- and Internet-based intervention was designed to influence several variables related to the prevention of pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in rural adolescents. The intervention was guided by the extended parallel process model and was evaluated using a pretest-post-test control group design with random assignment at the school level. Three hundred and twenty-six tenth-grade males and females enrolled in two rural Appalachian public high schools completed the survey at both points in time. Results indicate the vast majority (88.5%) of students in the experimental school completed at least one activity (M = 3.46 for those doing at least one activity). Further, both the overall program and all but one of the activities were rated positively by participants. Regarding the effects of the intervention, results indicate that students in the experimental school were less likely to initiate sexual activity and had greater general knowledge, greater condom negotiation self-efficacy, more favorable attitudes toward waiting to have sex, and greater situational self-efficacy than in the control school. In tandem, the results suggest that the computer-based programs may be a cost-effective and easily replicable means of providing teens with basic information and skills necessary to prevent pregnancy, STDs, and HIV.
    Journal of Health Communication 01/2007; 12(1):53-76. · 1.61 Impact Factor
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    Seth M Noar, Christi Cole, Kellie Carlyle
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    ABSTRACT: Despite numerous studies that measure self-reported condom use, there is currently no agreed upon "gold standard" in terms of the best way to assess condom use. The purpose of the current study was to review measures of self-reported condom use within correlational studies of sexual risk behavior, and to evaluate such measures on the basis of suggestions from the methodological literature. An additional purpose was to examine specifically whether measures published in the correlational literature have improved over time. A systematic review of studies was undertaken and specific review criteria were used to guide the inclusion of studies. A final set of 56 studies that contained 72 measures of self-reported condom use were included in the review. These measures were coded and evaluated on 12 dimensions, including measure type, number of response categories, recall period, sex partner specificity, and sex act specificity. Results indicated a great amount of diversity in terms of how condom use has been measured in the literature. Although results indicated that measures published between 1996 and 2003 were of higher quality on a number of dimensions as compared to 1989-1995, a number of these gains were minimal and in some cases measures have decreased in quality. The overall conclusion is that the sexual risk behavior literature should implement more of the recommendations made by methodological scholars in this area. Specific recommendations are summarized and presented in a way that may be helpful in guiding the development of future measures of self-reported condom use.
    Archives of Sexual Behavior 07/2006; 35(3):327-45. · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • Seth M Noar, Kellie Carlyle, Christi Cole
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to quantitatively synthesize the growing literature on the relationship between safer sexual communication (SSC) among sexual partners and condom use, and to systematically examine a number of conceptual and methodological moderators of this relationship. Data from 53 articles published in 27 journals met criteria for the study. Fifty-five independent effect sizes coded from samples totaling N=18,529 were meta-analyzed. Results indicate that the mean sample-size weighted effect size of the SSC-condom use relation was r=.22, and a number of conceptual variables were found to moderate this relationship. Specifically, communication about condom use (r=.25) and sexual history (r=.23) had significantly (p<.05) larger effect sizes than communication about safer sex (r=.18). In addition, SSC measures operationalized differently had significantly (p<.05) different effect sizes. From largest to smallest, these were behavioral format (r=.29), intentional format (r=.18), and self-efficacy format (r=.13). Measures that tried to assess persuasion attempts as compared with informational exchanges were not found to have significantly different effect sizes (p>.05). Further, methodological moderators tended to be unrelated to effect size. Implications for the future study of safer sexual communication as well as the importance of emphasizing communication skills in HIV preventive interventions are discussed.
    Journal of Health Communication 06/2006; 11(4):365-90. · 1.61 Impact Factor
  • Anthony J Roberto, Kellie E. Carlyle, Leola McClure
    Communication Research Reports. 01/2006; 23(1):27-33.