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Publications (3)4.84 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to compare hospitalization rates due to pneumonia between Innu/Inuit communities in Labrador and non-Aboriginal communities on the Northern Peninsula of Newfoundland, Canada. This is a comparative study using data on hospitalization due to pneumonia for the period from April 1, 1995 to March 31, 2001, for the Innu/Inuit communities in Labrador and a sample of non-Aboriginal communities on the Northern Peninsula of Newfoundland. Data were obtained from the provincial hospital database. Hospitalization rates among the study groups were compared by age, gender, and type of pneumonia. The hospitalization rate due to pneumonia for the Innu/Inuit communities was 11.6 compared to 3.0 per 1000 population for non-Aboriginal communities (p<0.01x10(-4)). Among the Innu/Inuit communities, infants had the highest rate of hospitalization due to pneumonia (93.4 per 1000 population), while the elderly (10.2 per 1000 population) were found to have the highest rate among the non-Aboriginal sample. Overall hospitalization rate for the Innu communities (16.9 per 1000 population) was higher than that for Inuit communities (8.4 per 1000 population) (p<0.01x10(-4)). Aboriginal communities, particularly the Innu communities, had higher rates of hospitalization due to pneumonia compared to the non-Aboriginal sample. Findings of this study will be used as a foundation for more specific studies in an effort to increase our understanding of pneumonia and associated risk factors.
    International Journal of Infectious Diseases 02/2007; 11(1):23-8. · 2.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined the epidemiology and associated factors for suicide attempts requiring hospitalization in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. We extracted data from the provincial hospital separation database. Outcome measures included incidence rates (IRs) of suicide attempts by age, sex, and geographical region of residence. We also analyzed sociodemographic data to determine associated factors. A total of 978 patients who were hospitalized owing to suicide attempts were identified for 1998-2000, giving an overall IR of 68.7 per 100,000 person-years (P-Y). The age-specific rate for people aged 15 to 19 years was much greater, at 143.0 per 100,000 P-Y. The overall female-to-male ratio was 1.3, with an attempted suicide rate of 76.1 per 100,000 P-Y for female patients and 60.3 per 100,000 P-Y for male patients (P = 0.001). Labrador (210.2 per 100,000 P-Y), a region with a high Aboriginal population, had a higher rate of suicide attempts, compared with the island portion of the province (59.0 per 100,000 P-Y) (P < 0.001). More than 70% of hospitalizations were associated with psychiatric diagnosis. Poisoning was the most frequent method of attempting suicide. Higher IRs of suicide attempts were found among people who were divorced or separated and among those who were less educated (P < 0.001). Suicide attempt represents a significant public health concern in the province, particularly in Labrador. An increased risk of suicide attempts was associated with single status, female sex, younger age (teen or young adult), and low educational level during the index attempt. Further research is needed to explicate these findings and increase our understanding of attempted suicide.
    Canadian journal of psychiatry. Revue canadienne de psychiatrie 11/2005; 50(12):762-8. · 2.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose The objective of this study was to identify the epidemiologic characteristics of childhood burn injuries in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. Methods A population-based study was carried out on children aged 0–16 years who were hospitalized due to burn injuries in Newfoundland and Labrador between April 1995 and March 2001. Hospital and mortality data were obtained from the provincial hospital separation database and the Mortality Surveillance System, respectively. The Newfoundland and Labrador population was considered as a whole and as two separate geographic areas. Results A total of 157 hospital separations due to burn injuries were identified during the study period. The incidence rate of burns requiring hospitalization in the province was 22.6 per 100,000 person-years (P-Y). The rates for males and females were 28.1 and 16.8 per 100,000 P-Y, respectively (P < 0.000001). Infants (0–1 year) had the highest rate of burn injury (89.6 per 100,000 P-Y) followed by children aged 2–4 years (26.2 per 100,000 P-Y) (P < 0.000001). Labrador, a region with high Aboriginal population (51.5 per 100,000 P-Y), had a higher rate of burn injury compared to Newfoundland (20.5 per 100,000 P-Y) (P = 0.00001). Median age of patients with burns was 2 years in Newfoundland and 9 years in Labrador, respectively (P < 0.01). Overall, scald burn (52.2%) was the most frequent type of burn followed by fire (32.5%). In Newfoundland, scald burn was the most common type of burn (56.4%), while in Labrador fire was the most frequent type (66.7%). Overall mortality rate due to burns was 0.9 per 100,000 P-Y. Conclusion Age (infants) and gender (male) are potential risk factors for burn injury in Newfoundland and Labrador. Study results indicate a difference in the epidemiologic pattern of burn injury between Newfoundland and Labrador. It is recommended that preventive programs be directed towards high risk groups to reduce the incidence of burns.
    Annals of Epidemiology - ANN EPIDEMIOL. 01/2005; 15(8):657-658.