Kanako Takatsuki

The University of Tokyo, Edo, Tōkyō, Japan

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Publications (9)27.34 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Local protein synthesis in dendrites plays an important role in some aspects of neuronal development and synaptic plasticity. Neuronal RNA-binding proteins regulate the transport and/or translation of the localized mRNAs. Previously, we reported that hematopoietic zinc finger (Hzf) is one of the neuronal RNA-binding proteins that regulate these processes. The Hzf protein is highly expressed in neuronal cells including hippocampal pyramidal neurons and cerebellar Purkinje cells, and plays essential roles in the dendritic mRNA localization and translation. In the present study we demonstrated that mice lacking Hzf (Hzf(-/-) mice) exhibited severe impairments of motor coordination and cerebellum-dependent motor learning. These findings raise the possibility that the post-transcriptional regulation by Hzf may contribute to some aspects of synaptic plasticity and motor learning in the cerebellum.
    Neuroscience Research 07/2007; 58(2):183-9. · 2.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have shown that glutamate receptor subunit delta2 (GluRdelta2) null mutant mice, which have serious morphological and functional deficiencies in the cerebellar cortex, are severely impaired in delay eyeblink conditioning but not in trace eyeblink conditioning, even with a 0-trace interval. Such 0-trace conditioning does not depend critically on the hippocampus in wild-type mice, but it does in GluRdelta2 mutant mice. Here we examined the hippocampal electroencephalogram (EEG) during 0-trace conditioning in GluRdelta2 mutant and wild-type mice. During the apparatus habituation sessions, the total hippocampal theta activity (4-12 Hz) of GluRdelta2 mutant mice was less than that of wild-type mice. Activity in the higher frequency band (8-12 Hz, type 1) in GluRdelta2 mutant mice was significantly less than it was in wild-type mice, but activity in the lower frequency band (4-8 Hz, type 2) was not. As learning proceeded during the acquisition sessions, the total theta activity decreased in many of the wild-type mice, while this phenomenon was less prominent in GluRdelta2 mutant mice. Further analysis showed that the type 1 activity in wild-type mice increased in the early sessions and then decreased, while that in GluRdelta2 mutant mice did not change. Type 2 activity tended to decrease in both types of mice as the conditioning proceeded. These results indicate that the distribution of hippocampal EEG frequency and its properties during conditioning are different between wild-type and GluRdelta2 mutant mice, suggesting that the cerebellar cortical dysfunction may cause an alteration in the electrophysiological characteristics of the hippocampus.
    Brain Research 12/2005; 1063(2):159-67. · 2.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We examined the effects of acute injections of competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV) into the dorsal hippocampus on contextual fear conditioning and classical eyeblink conditioning in C57BL/6 mice. When injected 10 to 40 min before training, APV severely impaired contextual fear conditioning. Thus, APV injection under these conditions was sufficient to suppress hippocampal NMDA receptors. To investigate the role of hippocampal NMDA receptors on eyeblink conditioning, we carried out daily training of mice during 10-40 min after injection of APV. In the delay eyeblink conditioning, in which the unconditioned stimulus (US) is delayed and terminates simultaneously with the conditioned stimulus (CS), APV-injected mice acquired the conditioned responses (CRs) as well as artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF)-injected control mice did. However, in the trace eyeblink conditioning, in which the CS and US were separated by a stimulus-free trace interval of 500 ms, APV-injected mice showed severe impairment in acquisition of the CR. There was no significant difference in pseudo-conditioning between APV- and aCSF-injected mice. These results provide evidence that the NMDA receptor in the dorsal hippocampus is critically involved in acquisition of the CR in long trace eyeblink conditioning.
    Brain Research 04/2005; 1039(1-2):130-6. · 2.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Classical eyeblink conditioning has been known to depend critically on the cerebellum. Apparently consistent with this, glutamate receptor subunit delta2 null mutant mice, which have serious morphological and functional deficiencies in the cerebellar cortex, are severely impaired in delay paradigm. However, these mutant mice successfully learn in trace paradigm, even in '0-trace paradigm,' in which the unconditioned stimulus starts just after the conditioned stimulus terminates. Our previous studies revealed that the hippocampus and the muscarinic acetylcholine receptors play crucial roles in 0-trace paradigm in glutamate receptor subunit delta2 null mutant mice unlike in wild-type mice, suggesting a large contribution of the forebrain to 0-trace conditioning in this type of mutant mice. In the present study, we investigated the role of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in 0-trace eyeblink conditioning in glutamate receptor subunit delta2 null mutant mice. Mice were injected intraperitoneally with the noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist (+)MK-801 (0.1mg/kg) or saline, and conditioned with 350-ms tone conditioned stimulus followed by 100-ms periorbital shock unconditioned stimulus. Glutamate receptor subunit delta2 null mutant mice that received (+)MK-801 injection exhibited a severe impairment in acquisition of the conditioned response, compared with the saline-injected glutamate receptor subunit delta2 null mutant mice. In contrast, wild-type mice were not impaired in acquisition of 0-trace conditioned response by (+)MK-801 injection. After the injection solution was changed from (+)MK-801 to saline, glutamate receptor subunit delta2 null mutant mice showed a rapid and partial recovery of performance of the conditioned response. On the other hand, when the injection solution was changed from saline to (+)MK-801, glutamate receptor subunit delta2 null mutant mice showed a marked impairment in expression of the pre-acquired conditioned response, whereas impairment of the expression was small in wild-type mice. Injection of (+)MK-801 had no significant effects on spontaneous eyeblink frequency or startle eyeblink frequency to the tone conditioned stimulus in either glutamate receptor subunit delta2 null mutant mice or wild-type mice. These results suggest that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors play critical roles both in acquisition and expression of the conditioned response in 0-trace eyeblink conditioning in glutamate receptor subunit delta2 null mutant mice.
    Neuroscience 02/2005; 135(4):1017-23. · 3.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mutant mice lacking the glutamate receptor subunit delta2 exhibit changes in the structure and function of the cerebellar cortex. The most prominent functional feature is a deficiency in the long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses. These mutant mice exhibit severe impairment during delay eyeblink conditioning but learn normally during trace eyeblink conditioning without the cerebellar LTD, even with a 0 trace interval. We investigated the hippocampal contribution to this cerebellar LTD-independent "0 trace interval" learning. The mutant mice whose dorsal hippocampi were aspirated exhibited severe impairment in learning, whereas those that received post-training hippocampal lesions retained the memory. The wild-type mice showed no impairment in either case. These results suggest that the hippocampal component of the eyeblink conditioning task becomes dominant when cerebellar LTD is impaired.
    Journal of Neuroscience 02/2003; 23(1):17-22. · 6.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We examined the role of the hippocampus in memory retention after trace eyeblink conditioning in mice. After establishing the conditioned response (CR) in the trace paradigm, mice received a bilateral aspiration of the dorsal hippocampus and its overlying neocortex on the next day (1-day group) or after 4 weeks (4-week group). Control mice received a neocortical aspiration on the same schedule as the hippocampal-lesion group. After 2 weeks of recovery, these groups received additional conditioning for 3 days. Frequency of the CR of the 1-day group was as low as spontaneous values on the first day in the post-lesion session and never reached pre-surgical level during the post-lesion sessions, while that of the control group did reach pre-surgical level during the post-lesion sessions although there was a transient decline just after lesion. In contrast to the 1-day group, the 4-week-hippocampal lesion group retained the CR and showed a further increase, without significant difference from the control group. The temporal pattern of the CR also was unchanged by the hippocampal lesion 4 weeks after learning. These results suggest a time-limited role for the hippocampus in memory retention after trace conditioning in mice: the CR acquired recently requires an intact hippocampus for its retention, but the CR acquired remotely does not. This is similar to the result reported in rabbits. Therefore, the mechanism and time course of memory consolidation after trace eyeblink conditioning may be similar in mice and rabbits.
    Brain Research 11/2002; 951(2):183-90. · 2.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cerebellar long-term depression (LTD) at the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses has been proposed to be a neural substrate for classical eyeblink conditioning. Mutant mice lacking the glutamate receptor subunit δ2 (GluRδ2), in which the cerebellar LTD is disrupted, exhibited a severe impairment in the delay eyeblink conditioning with a temporal overlap of CS and US. However, they learned normally trace and delay conditioning without CS-US overlap, suggesting a learning mechanism which does not require the cerebellar LTD.In the present study, we tested possible involvement of the hippocampus in this cerebellar LTD-independent learning. We examined effects of scopolamine and hippocampal lesion on the delay conditioning without CS-US overlap. TheGluRδ2 mutant mice that received scopolamine or aspiration of the dorsalhippocampus together with its overlying cortex exhibited a severe impairment in learning, while the control mutant mice that received saline or aspiration of the overlying cortex learned normally. In contrast, wild-type mice that received either treatment learned as normally as the control wild-type mice. These results suggest that the hippocampus is essential in the cerebellar LTD-independent learning in the GluRδ2 mutant mice, indicating a newrole of hippocampus in the paradigm with a short trace interval.
    Journal of Biological Physics 09/2002; 28(3):539-47. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We investigated the effect of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) antagonist scopolamine on eyeblink conditioning in glutamate receptor subunit 62 null mice, which have severe impairments in cerebellar long-term depression (LTD). Mice were injected intraperitoneally with scopolamine (0.5 mg/kg) or saline, and conditioned using a delay paradigm with tone and periorbital shock but with no overlap between them. The saline-injected mutant mice learned this paradigm normally, as predicted from our previous study. When scopolamine was injected, learning was impaired more severely in the mutant mice than in the wild type mice. Basic sensory and motor performances were not affected. These results suggest that eyeblink conditioning in cerebellar LTD deficient mice depends largely on neural functions susceptible to blocking of mAChRs.
    Neuroreport 02/2002; 13(1):159-62. · 1.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are involved in synaptic plasticity and play a critical role in learning and memory. We investigated the effects of the noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist (+)MK-801 on classical eyeblink conditioning of mice, using various interstimulus intervals between the conditioned stimulus (CS) and unconditioned stimulus (US). A tone was used for the CS and a periorbital shock was used for the US. In the delay paradigm, in which the US coterminated with the CS or started immediately after CS offset, the effect of (+)MK-801 (0.1mg/kg, i.p.) was a slight impairment in the acquisition of the conditioned response (CR). During subsequent CS-alone trials, the responses of (+)MK-801-injected mice were extinguished as easily as those of saline-injected mice. In the trace paradigm, (+)MK-801 impaired acquisition of the CR with a trace interval of 250 ms more than it did with a trace interval of 100 ms, and more than in the delay paradigm. (+)MK-801 injected after acquisition of 250-ms trace conditioning did not impair expression or extinction of the CR. These results suggest that NMDA receptors are involved in acquisition of the CR during longer trace interval conditioning more than during shorter trace interval conditioning or delay conditioning, and that their contribution to extinction is much smaller than their contribution to acquisition in mouse eyeblink conditioning.
    Neuropharmacology 11/2001; 41(5):618-28. · 4.11 Impact Factor