João P B Vieira-Filho

Universidade Federal de São Paulo, San Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

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Publications (12)26.52 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Aims To examine the properties of HbA1c to detect diabetes and IGT in adult Brazilian Xavante Indians, a high risk population for diabetes. Methods The survey was carried out between October 2010 and January 2012 and based on a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Basal and 2 hour capillary glycaemia were measured by HemoCue Glucose 201+; HbA1c using an automated high-performance liquid chromatography analyzer (Tosoh G7). Results 630 individuals aged ≥ 20 years were examined and 80 had a previous diagnosis of diabetes. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for HbA1c ≥ 6.5% (≥ 48 mmol/mol) were 71.3%, 90.5% and 87.2%. The areas under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.88 (95%CI: 0.83-0.93). To identify IGT, HbA1c values between 5.7% and 6.4% (39 - 47 mmol/mol) presented sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 87.2%, 24.7% and 51.4%, with an AUC of 0.62 (95%CI: 0.57-0.67). Conclusions The ADA/WHO proposed cut-off of 6.5% (48 mmol/mol) for HbA1c was adequate to detect diabetes among the Xavante. However, the performance of the ADA proposed cut-off points for pre-diabetes, when used to detect IGT was inadequate and should not be recommended.
    Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice 09/2014; 106(2). DOI:10.1016/j.diabres.2014.08.027 · 2.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To estimate the prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and describe demographic, anthropometric and medical characteristics, in a genetically distinct population: the Brazilian Xavante Indians. Population-based survey carried out among 948 Xavante from Mato Grosso, Brazil. Fasting and 2-hour after 75 g glucose capillary glycemia were measured by a portable glucometer (HemoCue Glucose201+). Diabetes was defined according to WHO criteria. Anthropometric data and medical characteristics were measured, and fat mass (%) was evaluated using bioelectrical impedance. Blood pressure was measured by an automated device (OMRON 742INTC), and hypertension was defined according to WHO criteria. Age-adjusted prevalence rates with 95% confidence intervals were diabetes: 28.2% (25.3-31.1) in general, 18.4% (14.9-22.2) in men and 40.6% (36.2-45.1) in women (P<.001); impaired glucose tolerance: 32.3% (20.5-26.0) in general, 29.7% (25.4-33.9) in men and 34.4% (30.2-38.8) in women (P>.05); hypertension: 17.5% (15.1-19.9) in general. Obesity was found in 50.8% of the individuals. Fat mass (%) was associated with diabetes in men (P<.05) and women (P<.05). Thigh circumference and waist/ thigh ratio were lower in those with diabetes, in men and women (P<.001). The high prevalence of diabetes and obesity in Xavante is likely related to their recent change in food habits and physical activities. Our results should raise awareness about the magnitude of this health problem and also indicate that it could increase dramatically in the future if no preventive actions are adopted.
    Ethnicity & disease 01/2014; 24(1):35-40. · 0.92 Impact Factor
  • J D B Cardone · A K Chiba · E Boturão-Neto · J P B Vieira-Filho · J O Bordin
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    ABSTRACT: The HPA-15 (Gov) alloantigen is a biallelic co-dominant system on human platelets, and its allele HPA-15a and HPA-15b differ by an A-->C single nucleotide polymorphism at nucleotide 2108 of the coding sequence resulting in a Tyr682Ser substitution in the mature CD109 glycoprotein. Employing the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique, we determined the HPA-15 gene frequencies among 276 subjects of distinct Brazilian ethnic groups including, 15 Caucasians, 15 African Brazilians, 15 Orientals, 106 Amazon Xikrin Indians, 31 Amazon Gavioes Indians and 94 blood donors. The calculated HPA-15a and HPA-15b allele frequencies found in Caucasians (0.53/0.47), African Brazilians (0.57/0.43), Orientals (0.57/0.43) and Brazilian blood donors (0.52/0.48) did not differ significantly. However, the HPA-15a and HPA-15b gene frequencies of Xikrin Indians (0.78/0.22) were significantly different from that of all other groups (P < 0.01). The HPA-15a/a, HPA-15a/b and HPA-15b/b genotype frequencies observed in Gavioes Indians were significantly different from those seen in African Brazilians (P = 0.04) and blood donors (P = 0.017). The present data showed that the distribution of the HPA-15 (Gov) system alleles observed among the Brazilian population is quite similar to the distributions already reported among Asian, Canadian and European populations. Moreover, the data indicated differences in the frequency of the HPA-15 system between Amazon Indians and other distinct Brazilian ethnic groups suggesting that Amerindians would be at higher risk of HPA-15 alloimmunization in the need of receiving blood components collected from blood donors of other ethnic groups.
    Transfusion Medicine 12/2004; 14(6):433-7. DOI:10.1111/j.1365-3148.2004.00539.x · 1.31 Impact Factor
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    Diabetes Care 03/2004; 27(2):621-2. DOI:10.2337/diacare.27.2.621 · 8.57 Impact Factor
  • Ethnicity & disease 02/2004; 14(1):159. · 0.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. C677T mutation at the MTHFR gene and deficiencies of folic acid and vitamin B-12 may account for elevation of total homocysteine (tHcy). Ninety Brazilian Parkatêjê Indians (90.0% of the population without admixture, aged > or = 20 years) were studied. Hyperhomocysteinemia was observed in 26.7% of the Indians. No case of vitamin B-12 deficiency was detected. Folic acid deficiency was found in 43.3% of the subjects. Rates of mutated allele 677T and TT genotype were 40.7% and 14.0%, respectively. Prevalence of hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking, WHR > or = 0.9, BMI > or = 25 kg/m2 and chronic alcohol use were 4.4%, 44.4%, 25.6%, 72.2%, 67.8%, and 0.0%, respectively. All creatinine values were normal. Natural logarithmic (ln) tHcy showed no correlation with age, but was positively correlated with systolic (r = 0.22) and diastolic (r = 0.21) blood pressure and triglycerides (r = 0.39) and inversely correlated with folic acid (r = -0.40) adjusted for age and sex. Total homocysteine (tHcy) was higher among TT genotype (P < .001). The multiple linear regression model, containing variables for sex, folic acid, TT genotype, and triglycerides, explained 50.0% of the variation of the ln tHcy. In summary, high rates of cardiovascular risk factors were discovered. C667T mutation and folic acid deficiency can explain, at least in part, the observed hyperhomocysteinemia.
    Ethnicity & disease 02/2004; 14(1):49-56. · 0.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Parkatêjê Indians, belonging to the Jê group and inhabiting the Mãe Maria Reservation in the southeast of the state of Pará in the Amazon Region of Brazil, have suffered rapid and intensive cultural changes in recent years. This survey was designed to characterize the metabolic profile and the frequency of cardiovascular risk factors in this community. Ninety subjects (90.0% of the adult population without admixture) were investigated. Anthropometric measurements were performed and the following clinical characteristics measured: glycemia, serum insulin and proinsulin (fasting and 2-hr post 75 g of glucose load), beta-cell function (%B) and insulin sensitivity (%S) estimated by HOMA, HbA1c, GAD65 antibody, serum lipids, uric acid, creatinine, leptin, and blood pressure. Information about alcohol use, smoking, and medical history was obtained through individual interviews. The prevalences were: overweight, 67.8%; obesity, 14.4%; central obesity, 72.2%; hypertension, 4.4%; dyslipidemia, 44.4%; hyperuricemia, 5.6%; GAD65 antibody positivity, 4.4%; smoking, 25.6%; chronic alcohol use, 0.0%. One case of impaired glucose tolerance (1.1%) and one case of impaired fasting glycemia (1.1%) were diagnosed during this study and one case of diabetes (1.1%) was diagnosed previously. The diabetic woman was excluded from the analyses involving HbA1c, glycemia, insulin, proinsulin, %B, and %S. All creatinine values were normal. Blood pressure did not correlate with age, anthropometric measurements, insulin, proinsulin, and natural logarithm (ln) transformed %S. After adjustment for age and sex, there were positive correlations between total cholesterol and body mass index (BMI; r = 0.24), triglycerides and BMI (r = 0.44), triglycerides and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR; r = 0.52), In leptin and BMI (r = 0.41), In leptin and WHR (r = 0.29), uric acid and systolic blood pressure (r = 0.34), uric acid and triglycerides (r = 0.22). Systolic (r = 0.04; r = 0.70) and diastolic (r = 0.14; p = 0.18) blood pressure did not correlate with BMI. Ln leptin had a weak positive correlation with 2-hr insulin (r = 0.14) adjusted for age, sex, and BMI. The multiple linear regression model containing the variables sex, BMI, and 2-hr insulin concentrations explained 77.2% of the variation of ln leptin. In conclusion, the high rates of cardiovascular risk factors found among these Indians point to there being a high-risk group to develop diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. To reduce this risk they need to receive preventive interventions.
    Human Biology 03/2003; 75(1):31-46. · 1.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Parkatêjê Indians, belonging to the Jê group and inhabiting the Mãe Maria Reservation in the southeast of the state of Pará in the Amazon Region of Brazil, have suffered rapid and intensive cultural changes in recent years. This survey was designed to characterize the metabolic profile and the frequency of cardiovascular risk factors in this community. Ninety subjects (90.0% of the adult population without admixture) were investigated. Anthropometric measurements were performed and the following clinical characteristics measured: glycemia, serum insulin and proinsulin (fasting and 2-hr post 75 g of glucose load), ß-cell function (%B) and insulin sensitivity (%S) estimated by HOMA, HbA1c, GAD65 antibody, serum lipids, uric acid, creatinine, leptin, and blood pressure. Information about alcohol use, smoking, and medical history was obtained through individual interviews. The prevalences were: overweight, 67.8%; obesity, 14.4%; central obesity, 72.2%; hypertension, 4.4%; dyslipidemia, 44.4%; hyperuricemia, 5.6%; GAD65 antibody positivity, 4.4%; smoking, 25.6%; chronic alcohol use, 0.0%. One case of impaired glucose tolerance (1.1%) and one case of impaired fasting glycemia (1.1%) were diagnosed during this study and one case of diabetes (1.1%) was diagnosed previously. The diabetic woman was excluded from the analyses involving HbA1c, glycemia, insulin, proinsulin, %B, and %S. All creatinine values were normal. Blood pressure did not correlate with age, anthropometric measurements, insulin, proinsulin, and natural logarithm (ln) transformed %S. After adjustment for age and sex, there were positive correlations between total cholesterol and body mass index (BMI; r = 0.24), triglycerides and BMI (r = 0.44), triglycerides and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR; r = 0.52), ln leptin and BMI (r = 0.41), ln leptin and WHR (r = 0.29), uric acid and systolic blood pressure (r = 0.34), uric acid and triglycerides (r = 0.22). Systolic (r = 0.04; r = 0.70) and diastolic (r = 0.14; p = 0.18) blood pressure did not correlate with BMI. Ln leptin had a weak positive correlation with 2-hr insulin (r = 0.14) adjusted for age, sex, and BMI. The multiple linear regression model containing the variables sex, BMI, and 2-hr insulin concentrations explained 77.2% of the variation of ln leptin. In conclusion, the high rates of cardiovascular risk factors found among these Indians point to there being a high-risk group to develop diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. To reduce this risk they need to receive preventive interventions.
    Human Biology 01/2003; 75(1):31-46. DOI:10.1353/hub.2003.0028 · 1.52 Impact Factor
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    Edelweiss F. Tavares · João P.B. Vieira-Filho · Adagmar Andriolo · Laércio J. Franco
    Arquivos Brasileiros de Endocrinologia & Metabologia 06/2002; 46(3):260-268. · 0.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The FcgammaRIIA gene is expressed in two polymorphic forms, R131 and H131, which differ by the replacement of histidine by arginine at position 131. The FCGR3B (FcgammaRIIIB) gene exists in two allelic isoforms, known as FCGR3B1 (FcgammaRIIIB-NA1) and FCGR3B2 (FcgammaRIIIB-NA2), which differ in nucleotides 141, 147, 227, 277, and 349. An additional polymorphism is the SH antigen that is associated with the FCGR3B3 (FcgammaRIIIB-SH) allele. By use of a PCR with allele-specific primers, the allelic polymorphisms of FcgammaRIIA and FcgammaRIIIB were determined among 263 unrelated Brazilian subjects, including Amazon Indians (n = 92), blood donors (n = 85), and patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) (n = 86). Amazon Indians had a significantly higher frequency of the R131 allele than did blood donors and SCD patients (0.91 vs. 0.55 vs. 0.55; p<0.001). NA1 and NA2 gene frequencies were found to be 0.67 and 0.21 for Amazon Indians, 0.58 and 0.42 for blood donors, and 0.61 and 0.39 for SCD patients, respectively. The FcgammaRIIIB-SH allele was absent from the Amazon Indians, but 9 (10.6%) blood donors and 10 (11.6%) SCD patients expressed this allele. Overall, the data indicate that the distribution of the FcgammaRIIIB alleles is significantly different in Amazon Indians from the distribution in Brazilian blood donors or African Brazilian patients with SCD, but that it is similar to the distributions reported in Asian populations. Moreover, the distribution of the FcgammaRIIA and FcgammaRIIIB alleles among Brazilian blood donors and SCD patients is comparable to the distributions reported in whites from the United States and Europe.
    Transfusion 12/2000; 40(11):1388-92. DOI:10.1046/j.1537-2995.2000.40111388.x · 3.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The frequencies of human platelet-specific alloantigens (HPAs) vary between different ethnic groups, and genotyping using DNA techniques has been preferred over immunophenotyping methods for population studies. Using a polymerase chain reaction with allele-specific primers (PCR-ASP) method, we determined the allelic polymorphisms of five HPA systems among 174 unrelated individuals of two different Brazilian ethnic groups including Amazon Indians (n = 95) and blood donors (n = 79). Comparison of the calculated gene frequencies of the two alleles of HPA-1, -2, -3, -4 and -5 systems for Amazon Indians and Brazilian blood donors showed that gene frequencies obtained for the two alleles of HPA-1 (P<0.001), HPA-2 (P = 0.001) and HPA-5 (P<0.001) were significantly different between the two groups of individuals. All natives tested carried the HPA-2a and the HPA-5a alleles, but the HPA-1b and HPA-4b alleles are absent from the Indian population. It was also observed that all blood donors carried the HPA-1a, HPA-4a and HPA-5a alleles. In conclusion, the present data indicate differences in the frequency of the HPA systems between Amazon Indians and Brazilian subjects who present a high rate of racial admixture. While the frequencies of the HPA-1 and HPA-5 genes seen in Amazon Indians are similar to those reported for Oriental populations, the frequencies of the HPAs alleles in Brazilian blood donors are comparable to those reported for populations in North America and Europe.
    Transfusion Medicine 09/2000; 10(3):207-12. DOI:10.1046/j.1365-3148.2000.00254.x · 1.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A seroprevalence study for human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) and HTLV-2 was conducted in Sao Paulo, Brazil among 2,312 individuals that included following groups: 1,148 volunteer blood donors, 37 patients with tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP), 53 with lymphoproliferative disorders, 171 with a history of multiple blood transfusions, 268 human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) seropositive subjects, and 635 Amazonian Indians. Antibodies to HTLV-1/2 were screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by Western blot and/or radioimmunoprecipitation. The differentiation of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 was achieved using a synthetic recombinant peptide (rgp46) ELISA. We confirmed the presence of HTLV-1 infection in Brazil, both in blood donors (0.4%) and in patients exposed to blood transfusions (2.9%), as well as the occurrence of HTLV-1-associated TSP (11 patients, or 30% of all TSP cases) and adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (two cases, or 3.5% of all hematologic malignancies). The HIV-1 infected individuals were shown to be coinfected (8.9%) with either HTLV-1 or HTLV-2. All HIV-1 and HTLV-2 coinfected individuals were intravenous drug abusers. In addition, we also demonstrated the presence of HTLV-2 (4.7%), and HTLV-1/2 (0.8%) in tribes of Amazonian Indians who lived in the eastern Amazon basin (southeastern State of Para). The selectivity of these retroviral infections in particular groups is emphasized, as well as the need for HTLV-1/2 screening of all blood donors in Brazil as a public health measure.
    The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene 01/1994; 49(6):664-71. · 2.74 Impact Factor