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Publications (3)89.93 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: In the Randomized Evaluation in PCI Linking Angiomax to Reduced Clinical Events (REPLACE)-2 trial, bivalirudin with provisional glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (Gp IIb/IIIa) inhibition was found to be noninferior to heparin plus planned Gp IIb/IIIa blockade in the prevention of acute ischemic end points and was associated with significantly less bleeding by 30 days after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). To determine whether the efficacy of bivalirudin remains comparable with that of heparin plus Gp IIb/IIIa blockade over 6 months and 1 year. Follow-up study to 1 year of a randomized, double-blind trial conducted among 6010 patients undergoing urgent or elective PCI at 233 community or referral hospitals in 9 countries from October 2001 through August 2002. Patients were randomly assigned to receive intravenously bivalirudin (0.75 mg/kg bolus, 1.75 mg/kg per hour for the duration of PCI), with provisional Gp IIb/IIIa inhibition, or to receive heparin (65 U/kg bolus), with planned Gp IIb/IIIa inhibition (abciximab or eptifibatide). Both groups received daily aspirin and a thienopyridine for at least 30 days after PCI. Incidence of death, myocardial infarction, or repeat revascularization by 6 months and death by 12 months after enrollment. At 6 months, death occurred in 1.4% of patients in the heparin plus Gp IIb/IIIa group and in 1.0% of patients in the bivalirudin group (hazard ratio [HR], 0.70; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.43-1.14; P =.15). Myocardial infarction occurred in 7.4% and 8.2% of patients, respectively (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 0.93-1.34; P =.24), and repeat revascularization was required in 11.4% and 12.1% of patients, respectively (HR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.91-1.23; P =.45). By 1 year, death occurred in 2.46% of patients treated with heparin plus Gp IIb/IIIa blockade and in 1.89% of patients treated with bivalirudin (HR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P =.16). Nonsignificant trends toward lower 1-year mortality with bivalirudin were present in all patient subgroups analyzed and were of greatest magnitude among high-risk patients. Long-term clinical outcome with bivalirudin and provisional Gp IIb/IIIa blockade is comparable with that of heparin plus planned Gp IIb/IIIa inhibition during contemporary PCI.
    JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association 09/2004; 292(6):696-703. · 29.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The direct thrombin inhibitor bivalirudin has been associated with better efficacy and less bleeding than heparin during coronary balloon angioplasty but has not been widely tested during contemporary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). To determine the efficacy of bivalirudin, with glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (Gp IIb/IIIa) inhibition on a provisional basis for complications during PCI, compared with heparin plus planned Gp IIb/IIIa blockade with regard to protection from periprocedural ischemic and hemorrhagic complications. The Randomized Evaluation in PCI Linking Angiomax to Reduced Clinical Events (REPLACE)-2 trial, a randomized, double-blind, active-controlled trial conducted among 6010 patients undergoing urgent or elective PCI at 233 community or referral hospitals in 9 countries from October 2001 through August 2002. Patients were randomly assigned to receive intravenous bivalirudin (0.75-mg/kg bolus plus 1.75 mg/kg per hour for the duration of PCI), with provisional Gp IIb/IIIa inhibition (n = 2999), or heparin (65-U/kg bolus) with planned Gp IIb/IIIa inhibition (abciximab or eptifibatide) (n = 3011). Both groups received daily aspirin and a thienopyridine for at least 30 days after PCI. The primary composite end point was 30-day incidence of death, myocardial infarction, urgent repeat revascularization, or in-hospital major bleeding; the secondary composite end point was 30-day incidence of death, myocardial infarction, or urgent repeat revascularization. Provisional Gp IIb/IIIa blockade was administered to 7.2% of patients in the bivalirudin group. By 30 days, the primary composite end point had occurred among 9.2% of patients in the bivalirudin group vs 10.0% of patients in the heparin-plus-Gp IIb/IIIa group (odds ratio, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.77-1.09; P =.32). The secondary composite end point occurred in 7.6% of patients in the bivalirudin vs 7.1% of patients in the heparin-plus-Gp IIb/IIIa groups (odds ratio, 1.09; 95% confidence interval 0.90-1.32; P =.40). Prespecified statistical criteria for noninferiority to heparin plus Gp IIb/IIIa were satisfied for both end points. In-hospital major bleeding rates were significantly reduced by bivalirudin (2.4% vs 4.1%; P<.001). Bivalirudin with provisional Gp IIb/IIIa blockade is statistically not inferior to heparin plus planned Gp IIb/IIIa blockade during contemporary PCI with regard to suppression of acute ischemic end points and is associated with less bleeding.
    JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association 02/2003; 289(7):853-63. · 29.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Context The direct thrombin inhibitor bivalirudin has been associated with better efficacy and less bleeding than heparin during coronary balloon angioplasty but has not been widely tested during contemporary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).Objective To determine the efficacy of bivalirudin, with glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (Gp IIb/IIIa) inhibition on a provisional basis for complications during PCI, compared with heparin plus planned Gp IIb/IIIa blockade with regard to protection from periprocedural ischemic and hemorrhagic complications.Design, Setting, and Participants The Randomized Evaluation in PCI Linking Angiomax to Reduced Clinical Events (REPLACE)–2 trial, a randomized, double-blind, active-controlled trial conducted among 6010 patients undergoing urgent or elective PCI at 233 community or referral hospitals in 9 countries from October 2001 through August 2002.Interventions Patients were randomly assigned to receive intravenous bivalirudin (0.75-mg/kg bolus plus 1.75 mg/kg per hour for the duration of PCI), with provisional Gp IIb/IIIa inhibition (n = 2999), or heparin (65-U/kg bolus) with planned Gp IIb/IIIa inhibition (abciximab or eptifibatide) (n = 3011). Both groups received daily aspirin and a thienopyridine for at least 30 days after PCI.Main Outcome Measures The primary composite end point was 30-day incidence of death, myocardial infarction, urgent repeat revascularization, or in-hospital major bleeding; the secondary composite end point was 30-day incidence of death, myocardial infarction, or urgent repeat revascularization.Results Provisional Gp IIb/IIIa blockade was administered to 7.2% of patients in the bivalirudin group. By 30 days, the primary composite end point had occurred among 9.2% of patients in the bivalirudin group vs 10.0% of patients in the heparin-plus-Gp IIb/IIIa group (odds ratio, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.77-1.09; P = .32). The secondary composite end point occurred in 7.6% of patients in the bivalirudin vs 7.1% of patients in the heparin-plus-Gp IIb/IIIa groups (odds ratio, 1.09; 95% confidence interval 0.90-1.32; P = .40). Prespecified statistical criteria for noninferiority to heparin plus Gp IIb/IIIa were satisfied for both end points. In-hospital major bleeding rates were significantly reduced by bivalirudin (2.4% vs 4.1%; P<.001).Conclusions Bivalirudin with provisional Gp IIb/IIIa blockade is statistically not inferior to heparin plus planned Gp IIb/IIIa blockade during contemporary PCI with regard to suppression of acute ischemic end points and is associated with less bleeding. Figures in this Article Unfractionated heparin has been the standard of adjunctive antithrombin therapy during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for more than 25 years. Yet heparin is subject to important intrinsic limitations, including unpredictable pharmacokinetics, inhibition by plasma proteins, and the potential to activate platelets.1- 4 Considerable reductions in periprocedural complications have been achieved with administration of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (Gp IIb/IIIa) antagonists in addition to heparin.5 These potent platelet inhibitors are not used universally, however, in part because of concerns about cost and increased bleeding risk. The direct thrombin inhibitor bivalirudin was approved for clinical use in December 2000 as an alternative to heparin for patients with unstable angina during PCI, based primarily on the results of a randomized trial conducted between 1993 and 1994. In that study of 4312 patients, ischemic events were decreased by 22% and hemorrhagic complications by 62% with bivalirudin compared with heparin.6- 7 The relevance of these data to current interventional practice is unknown, given that coronary artery stents, Gp IIb/IIIa inhibitors, low-dose heparin regimens, and thienopyridines were not used at the time of that trial. Two smaller more contemporary pilot studies did suggest, however, that by replacing heparin with bivalirudin during PCI, adjunctive Gp IIb/IIIa blockade might be used selectively rather than for all patients.8- 9 If validated, such an approach might offer potential advantages with regard to cost, hemorrhagic risk, and procedural simplicity. Our current randomized trial was therefore performed to determine if bivalirudin, with Gp IIb/IIIa inhibitors used in a provisional fashion if necessary during the procedure, could provide protection from ischemic and bleeding complications of PCI comparable with the current efficacy standard of low-dose heparin plus routine Gp IIb/IIIa blockade.
    JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association 289(7):853-863. · 29.98 Impact Factor