J M H Hendrickx

Murray State University, Kentucky, United States

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Publications (127)46.85 Total impact

  • Geophysics 07/2013; 78(5):1-H11. · 1.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: 655 F resh water is under pressure in the humid tropics from population growth, land use and climate change, all of which are influenced by humans. These pressures are likely to have profound consequences. Here we present a research vision for the humid tropics as an outcome of a community workshop held in Hawaii in March 2011. This report includes various perspectives from the international scientific community and examines the key role that hydrology plays in the functioning of the humid tropics in this age of human impact on all facets of the natural environment. Processes that operate within the hydrological cycle are expected to accelerate as temperatures rise and the capacity of the air to carry moisture increases. Understanding of key interactions is limited geographically and relies heavily on model-based scenarios rather than observations. Better understanding of interactions within the hydrological cycle is needed for the hydrological community to actively address adaptation and mitigation strategies for anthro-pogenic and climate changes. Of particular concern are interactions among atmospheric moisture fluxes and vegetation, soil water and energy balances, near-surface and subsurface processes (including groundwater resources), and stream flow and the transport of sol-utes and sediments (Fig.1). Here we outline the state of knowledge, highlight critical research needs and suggest research strategies that would aid understanding of hydrology in the humid tropics in the context of rapidly changing environmental conditions. We identify three main research needs related to: (1) moisture cycling — we call for more explicit atten-tion to integrated measuring, modelling and understanding of water fluxes across the land–atmosphere continuum; (2) catchment pro-cesses — we highlight the need for a clear understanding of how human landscape alterations affect evapotranspiration and runoff ratio in diverse environments, as well as the need for more infor-mation on biogeochemical cycling; and (3) long-term data acquisi-tion and organization — we call for integrative field campaigns that Hydrological processes in the humid tropics differ from other regions in having greater energy inputs and faster rates of change, including human-induced change. Human influences on population growth, land use and climate change will profoundly influ-ence tropical hydrology, yet understanding of key hydrological interactions is limited. We propose that efforts to collect tropical data should explicitly emphasize characterizing moisture and energy fluxes from below the ground surface into the atmosphere. Research needs to chiefly involve field-based characterizations and modelling of moisture cycling and catchment processes, as well as long-term data acquisition and organization. simultaneously capture moisture dynamics from the deep subsurface through the troposphere, including long-term monitoring.
    Nature Reports Climate Change 01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: Surface Energy Balance Algorithms for Land (SEBAL) and Mapping EvapoTranspiration at high Resolution with Internalized Calibration (METRIC) are satellite-based image-processing models that calculate evapotranspiration (ET) as a residual of a surface energy balance. Both models are calibrated using inverse modelling at extreme conditions approach to develop image-specific estimations of the sensible heat flux (H) component of the surface energy balance and to effectively remove systematic biases in net radiation, soil heat flux, radiometric temperature and aerodynamic estimates. SEBAL and METRIC express the near-surface temperature gradient as an indexed function of radiometric surface temperature, eliminating the need for absolutely accurate surface temperature and the need for air temperature measurements. Slope and aspect functions and temperature lapsing are used in METRIC applications in mountainous terrains. SEBAL and METRIC algorithms are designed for relatively routine application by trained professionals familiar with energy balance, aerodynamics and basic radiation physics. The primary inputs for the models are short-wave and long-wave (thermal) images from satellite (e.g. Landsat and MODIS), a digital elevation model and ground-based weather data measured within or near the area of interest. ET ‘maps’ (i.e. images) developed using Landsat images provide means to quantify ET on a field basis in terms of both rate and spatial distribution. METRIC takes advantage of calibration using weather-based reference ET so that both calibration and extrapolation of instantaneous ET to 24-h and longer periods compensate for regional advection effects where ET can exceed daily net radiation. SEBAL and METRIC have advantages over conventional methods of estimating ET using crop coefficient curves or vegetation indices in that specific crop or vegetation type does not need to be known and the energy balance can detect reduced ET caused by water shortage, salinity or frost as well as evaporation from bare soil. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Hydrological Processes 12/2011; 25(26):4011 - 4027. · 2.50 Impact Factor
  • Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. 10/2011; 92(10):1271-1272.
  • Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. 10/2011; 92(10):1353-1357.
  • Proc SPIE 05/2011; 8017:801710.
  • S Hong, J M H Hendrickx, B Borchers
    Journal of Hydrology 01/2011; 370(1-4):122-138. · 2.96 Impact Factor
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    S H Hong, J M H Hendrickx, B Borchers
    International Journal of Remote Sensing. 01/2011; 32(21):6457-6477.
  • A. Akramkhanov, C. Martius, S.J. Park, J.M.H. Hendrickx
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    ABSTRACT: Inefficient irrigation and the excessive use of water on agricultural land in the Aral Sea Basin over several decades have led to saline soils. The main objective of this paper is to identify the environmental predictors to model the spatial distribution of soil salinity in a highly irrigated landscape. Soil salinity at farm scale was measured in the topsoil (Total Dissolved Solids, TDS) and down to a depth of 1.5 m by electromagnetic conductivity meter (CMv) over a regular grid covering an area of approximately 15 km2 in Khorezm Province, Uzbekistan. Six nested samplings within selected grids were conducted to reveal short-distance variation. Apart from widely-used terrain indices and those acquired from remote sensing, data on distance to drainage channels and long-term average groundwater observations were used to account for local parameters possibly influencing soil salinity. Topsoil salinity (TDS) was seen to be highly variable even at short distances (40 m) compared to average bul
    Geoderma 01/2011; 163(1–2):55-62. · 2.35 Impact Factor
  • N. Pradhan, J. M. Hendrickx, F. L. Ogden, S. W. Wollf
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    ABSTRACT: Remote sensing methods are increasingly employed in combination with modeling for evapotranspiration estimation because they can provide multi-temporal, spatially-distributed estimates of key variables based on spatially distributed measurements. The approach for estimating evapotranspiration with remotely sensed data couples thermal and optical remote sensing with energy balance models such as: SEBAL, Surface Energy Balance Algorithms for Land, and METRICtm, Mapping Evapotranspiration at high Resolution using Internalized Calibration. The objective of this study is to investigate how ground measurements and satellite imagery at different scales can be combined to retrieve actual evapotranspiration over large watersheds. Scales of ground measurements are: (1) point scale that is typical for regular meteorological measurements such as air temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, and wind speed; (2) footprint scale that varies from about 5,000 m2 for eddy-covariance measurements of sensible and latent heat fluxes to about 5,000,000 m2 for scintillometer sensible heat flux measurements when optical/thermal Landsat and MODIS satellites pass over around 10 am. In our analysis, we focused on evapotranspiration or consumptive use associated with irrigated agriculture in the Green River Basin in Wyoming that is the main headwater tributary of the entire Colorado River Basin. Ground-based meteorological stations, eddy-covariance and large-aperture scintillometers were set up in Pinedale, Green River basin, Wyoming to conduct the research. METRIC is used to retrieve evapotranspiration estimates from Landsat5 (30-120 m resolution) and MODIS (250-1000 m resolution) imagery.
    AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts. 12/2010;
  • Ulrike Falk, Jan M. H. Hendrickx, Christopher Conrad, Paul Vlek
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    ABSTRACT: In recent years, several methods have been developed to estimate the spatial distribution of actual evapotranspiration (ET) by the means of remote sensing (RS). One frequently used approach is to calculate ET from latent heat fluxes modeled as residuum of the surface energy balance. For this purpose, ground heat fluxes and sensible heat fluxes are subtracted from the energy available on the land surface. One of these methods is the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL), which has been applied to many ecosystems and different sensors. ET mapping from remotely sensed satellite images is critical for water management since the estimation of spatial and temporal ET distributions over large areas is impossible using only ground measurements. A major difficulty for the calibration and validation of operational ET RS algorithms is the validation against ground measurements of ET at a scale similar to the spatial resolution of the remote sensing image. The spatial length scale of remote sensing images covers a range from 30 m (Landsat) to 1000 m (MODIS). Direct methods to measure the latent heat flux (W/m2) -i.e. the evapotranspiration rate (mm/day) multiplied by the latent heat for vaporization- such as eddy covariance (EC) only provide measurements at a scale that may be considerably smaller than the estimate obtained from a remote sensing method. The Large Aperture Scintillometer (LAS) flux footprint area is larger (here about 1 km²) and its spatial extent better constraint than that of EC systems. Nevertheless, it is only an indirect method for estimation of ET. A detailed footprint analysis and its changes during the day is therefore necessary as well as uncertainties introduced by the different temporal scales. Overflight missions for mapping land surface properties were carried out to bridge the gap between the different spatial scales. The objective of this contribution is to present our experiences with time series of ET mapping using ground observations and the Surface Energy Balance Algorithms for Land (SEBAL) in an open savanna ecosystem in Burkina Faso, West Africa. Most of the area is agriculturally used land on a spatial scale considerably smaller than pixel size of the RS imagery. Two years of continuous data from LAS as well as EC systems are analyzed and compared to modeled estimates of ET using remote sensing. Meteorological and biophysical boundary conditions of West African climate are highly variable between dry and rainy season and lead to seasonal differences in the time series and energy balance closure. This is analyzed with regard to applicability of the different approaches to estimate ET.
    05/2010;
  • Proc SPIE 04/2010; 7664:76641O.
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    Jan M. Hendrickx
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    ABSTRACT: The Countermine Simulation Test Bed needs reliable initial conditions on short notice from denied areas. The most important initial conditions are soil moisture and soil temperature. Our research on remote satellite soil moisture mapping for the ERDC Countermine Simulation Test Bed has proved the concept that soil moisture maps with a resolution of 30 m can be produced in Afghanistan from operational Landsat images. Soil and canopy temperature are determined by the incoming global radiation. Our research on remote satellite global radiation mapping for the ERDC Countermine Simulation Test Bed has proved the concept that global radiation maps with a resolution of 2 km can be produced in Afghanistan from operational METEOSAT images. In addition, our research has shown that soil moisture conditions are strongly correlated to the digital values of Landsat Bands 1-4. Therefore, there is a high likelihood that a Landsat soil moisture map with resolution of 30 m can be downscaled to 2.7 using QuickBird Bands 104. Two research needs are identified: 1. Validation of the Landsat soil moisture product on roads and in river beds, deserts, riparian areas and forests; 2. Development of a reliable downscaling procedure for Landsat soil moisture maps (30 m) to Quickbird maps (2.7 m). The research results will be discussed with reference to each objective. Our research results clearly demonstrate the great potential of optical imagery (Landsat, MODIS, GOES, METEOSAT, QUICKBIRD and other platforms) for reliably initializing and constraining model runs with the Countermine Simulation Test Bed.
    02/2010;
  • E.M. Engle, J.B.J. Harrison, J.M.H. Hendrickx, B. Borchers
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    ABSTRACT: Creating accurate soil maps at small scales using traditional methods is a time consuming and expensive process. However, remote sensing techniques can provide spatially and spectrally contiguous data in a timely manner. For this study, 20 root zone soil moisture maps derived from Landsat images during the growing season were used for the detection of soil boundaries. A split moving window analysis along two demonstration transects in, respectively, a semi-arid desert and riparian area located in the Middle Rio Grande Valley of New Mexico showed that remotely sensed root zone soil moisture can reveal subsurface trends that can be used to identify soil boundaries which do not have a strong surface expression. Overall, the use of multiple remotely sensed root zone soil moisture images for soil boundary delineation shows great promise of becoming a valuable tool in the field of digital soil mapping. KeywordsRemote sensing-Boundary detection-Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL)-Split moving window-Soil mapping
    12/2009: pages 123-136;
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    ABSTRACT: Twelve modified passive capillary samplers (M-PCAPS) were installed in remote locations within a large, alpine watershed located in the southern Rocky Mountains of Colorado to collect samples of infiltration during the snowmelt and summer rainfall seasons. These samples were collected in order to provide better constraints on the isotopic composition of soil-water endmembers in the watershed. The seasonally integrated stable isotope composition (δ18O and δ2H) of soil-meltwater collected with M-PCAPS installed at shallow soil depths < 10 cm was similar to the seasonally integrated isotopic composition of bulk snow taken at the soil surface. However, meltwater which infiltrated to depths > 20 cm evolved along an isotopic enrichment line similar to the trendline described by the evolution of fresh snow to surface runoff from snowmelt in the watershed. Coincident changes in geochemistry were also observed at depth suggesting that the isotopic and geochemical composition of deep infiltration may be very different from that obtained by surface and/or shallow-subsurface measurements. The M-PCAPS design was also used to estimate downward fluxes of meltwater during the snowmelt season. Shallow and deep infiltration averaged 8·4 and 4·7 cm of event water or 54 and 33% of the measured snow water equivalent (SWE), respectively. Finally, dominant shallow-subsurface runoff processes occurring during snowmelt could be identified using geochemical data obtained with the M-PCAPS design. One soil regime was dominated by a combination of slow matrix flow in the shallow soil profile and fast preferential flow at depth through a layer of platy, volcanic rocks. The other soil regime lacked the rock layer and was dominated by slow matrix flow. Based on these results, the M-PCAPS design appears to be a useful, robust methodology to quantify soil-water fluxes during the snowmelt season and to sample the stable isotopic and geochemical composition of soil-meltwater endmembers in remote watersheds. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Hydrological Processes 12/2009; 24(7):834 - 849. · 2.50 Impact Factor
  • J. M. Hendrickx, F. L. Ogden, N. R. Pradhan, A. Byrd
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    ABSTRACT: Meeting the demand for spatially-distributed model outputs such as soil moisture is a major challenge in distributed hydrological modeling. While physics-based distributed parameter hydrologic models surely have their place in water-quality and land-use change studies, the ungauged basin problem has eluded solution using this approach, which has necessitated examination of simpler model formulations. We tested the SEBAL/METRIC approach to develop the soil moisture state in a basin and used a distributed hydrological model which successfully predicted the continuity of the soil moisture state for a long time frame filling the gaps in the satellite timing. But a distributed hydrological model's calibration data demand can't be met in an ungauged basin. Thus this research develops a one-parameter model, 'OPM', of saturated source area dynamics and the spatial distribution of soil moisture. The single required parameter in 'OPM' is the maximum soil moisture deficit within the catchment. The scaling formulation allows the prediction of the dynamics of saturated source areas as a function of basin-wide soil moisture state. This model offers a number of potential advantages. Firstly, the model parameter is independent of topographic index distribution and its' associated scale effects. Secondly, it may be possible to measure this single parameter using field measurements or remote sensing for initialization while the model uses a simple sand box water balance model to update this initialized parameter. Finally, the fact that this maximum soil moisture deficit parameter is a physical characteristic of the basin, estimation of this parameter avoids regionalization and parameter transferability problems.
    AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts. 12/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: Snowmelt is the most significant source of runoff generation and recharge in many of the mountainous watersheds worldwide and this is especially true in the southwestern United States. Yet, the isotopic and geochemical composition of the soil–meltwater endmember remains poorly constrained. Using the isotopic compositions of snow and snowmelt runoff samples taken from the landscape surface as proxies for soil–meltwater endmembers is problematic since they are typically not representative of the actual composition of soil meltwater. Furthermore, the applicability of current methodologies to collect the isotopic composition of meltwater is limited because of the remote and often seasonally inaccessible nature of the terrain where snowpacks develop. Therefore, a robust methodology requiring little maintenance or monitoring is desirable. A lab experiment was conducted to determine the suitability of using a modified passive capillary sampler (M-PCAPS) design to collect snowmelt infiltration for isotopic analysis. Passive capillary samplers are constructed from fiberglass wicks that can be installed in the soil to sample vadose-zone waters under a wide range of matric potentials and require little maintenance. Results from this lab experiment indicate that the wicking process associated with M-PCAPS does not fractionate water but certain precautions are necessary to prevent exchange between the wick and the atmosphere. In this experiment, M-PCAPS effectively tracked the changing isotopic composition of a soil reservoir undergoing evaporation. Therefore, M-PCAPS provide a robust methodology to sample the isotopic composition of snowmelt infiltration in remote watersheds and similar applications.
    Hydrological Processes 10/2009; 24:834-849. · 2.50 Impact Factor
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    U. Falk, C. Conrad, J. M. H. Hendrickx, P. L. G. Vlek
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    ABSTRACT: Evapotranspiration (ET) mapping from remotely sensed satellite images is critical for water management since the estimation of spatial and temporal ET distributions over large areas is impossible using only ground measurements. A major difficulty for the calibration and validation of operational ET remote sensing algorithms is the ground measurement of ET at a scale similar to the spatial resolution of the remote sensing image. The spatial length scale of remote sensing images covers a range from 30 m (Landsat) to 1000 m (MODIS). Direct methods to measure the latent heat flux (W/m2) -i.e. the evapotranspiration rate (mm/day) multiplied by the latent heat for vaporization- such as eddy covariance (EC) only provide measurements at a spatial scale that may be considerably smaller than the estimate obtained from a remote sensing method. The Large Aperture Scintillometer (LAS) flux footprint area is larger (here about 1 km²) and its spatial extent better constraint than that of EC systems. Nevertheless, it is only an indirect method for estimation of ET. The objective of this contribution is to present our experience with the analysis of ET mapping using ground observations and the Surface Energy Balance Algorithms for Land (SEBAL). Our focus here is especially on the differing spatial and temporal scales of observation methods and the assessment of footprints of measured and modeled ET. Two years of continuous data from LAS as well as EC systems are used for analysis and comparison to modeled estimates of ET using remote sensing. Meteorological and biophysical boundary conditions of West African climate are highly variable between dry and rainy season and lead to seasonal differences in the time series and energy balance closure. This is analyzed with regard to applicability of the different approaches to estimate ET. This research was funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) within the frameworks of the projects GLOWA Volta and BIOTA West.
    09/2009;
  • Proc SPIE 05/2009; 7303:730310.
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    ABSTRACT: Soil moisture conditions influence practically all aspects of Army activities and are increasingly affecting its systems and operations. Regional distributions of high resolution soil moisture data will provide critical information on operational mobility, penetration, and performance of landmine and UXO sensors. The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) developed the Gridded Surface/Subsurface Hydrologic Analysis (GSSHA), which is a grid-based two-dimensional hydrologic model that has been effectively applied to predict soil moisture conditions. GSSHA computes evapotranspiration (ET) using the Penman-Monteith equation. However, lack of reliable spatially-distributed meteorological data, particularly in denied areas, makes it difficult to reliably predict regional ET and soil moisture distributions. SEBAL is a remote sensing algorithm that computes spatio-temporal patterns of ET using a surface energy balance approach. SEBAL has been widely accepted and tested throughout the world against lysimeter, eddy-covariance and other field measurements. SEBAL estimated ET has shown good consistency and agreement for irrigated fields, rangelands and arid riparian areas. The main objective of this research is to demonstrate improved GSSHA soil moisture and hydrological predictions using SEBAL estimates of ET. Initial results show that the use of SEBAL ET and soil moisture estimates improves the ability of GSSHA to predict regional soil moisture distributions, and reduces uncertainty in runoff predictions.
    Proc SPIE 05/2009;

Publication Stats

919 Citations
46.85 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011
    • Murray State University
      Kentucky, United States
  • 1991–2005
    • New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology
      • Department of Earth and Environmental Science
      Socorro, NM, United States
  • 2000
    • National University of Colombia
      Μπογκοτά, Bogota D.C., Colombia
  • 1988
    • Wageningen University
      Wageningen, Gelderland, Netherlands