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Publications (10)1.08 Total impact

  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The motivation of the testing was to reduce noise generated by eddy Mach wave emission via enhanced mixing in the jet plume. This was to be accomplished through the use of an ejector shroud, which would bring in cooler ambient fluid to mix with the hotter jet flow. In addition, the contour of the mixer, with its chutes and lobes, would accentuate the merging of the outer and inner flows. The objective of the focused schlieren work was to characterize the mixing performance inside of the ejector. Using flow visualization allowed this to be accomplished in a non-intrusive manner.
    10/1999;
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    ABSTRACT: A large-field focusing schlieren apparatus was installed in the NASA Lewis Research Center 9 by 15 foot wind tunnel in an attempt to determine the density gradient flow field of a free jet issuing from a supersonic nozzle configuration. The nozzle exit geometry was designed to reduce acoustic emissions from the jet by enhancing plume mixing. Thus, the flow exhibited a complex three-dimensional structure which warranted utilizing the sharp focusing capability of this type of schlieren method. Design considerations concerning tunnel limitations, high-speed photography, and video tape recording are presented in the paper.
    02/1992;
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    ABSTRACT: The origin of dynamic pressure loads on external divergent engine nozzle flaps of the B-1B aircraft was investigated in the NASA/LaRC 16 foot transonic tunnel using a 6 percent full span model with powered engine nacelles. External flap dynamic loads and afterbody drag associated with flap removal were measured using this model. Both dry and max. A/B power nozzles were evaluated in this study. As a result of this study, the principal mechanisms responsible for high dynamic external flap loads were determined along with performance penalty associated with flap removal.
    07/1991;
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    ABSTRACT: Dynamic pressure loads were obtained on 1/12 scale models of the F-15B production aircraft and the F-15 S/MTD experimental aircraft with rectangular nozzles and canards. Flight Mach numbers from 0.51 to 1.20 were studied for aircraft angles of attack from 0 to 10 deg and nozzle pressure ratios from 1.00 to 5.09. The results show that dynamic levels are lower in the internozzle region of twin rectangular nozzles than are levels found with twin axisymmetric nozzles. At other locations, the levels associated with both geometries are of the same order of magnitude when normalized by aircraft dynamic Q. At Mach number of 0.51, the loads spectrum is dominated by plume shock noise processes for both geometries. Above Mach 0.51, this mechanism is associated with either vortex bursting from a forward location or turbulent boundary layer separation over the nozzle external flaps. At supersonic speeds both geometries show significantly decreased load levels.
    08/1990;
  • John M. Seiner, James C. Manning, Bernard Jansen
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    ABSTRACT: Supersonic jet plume interaction with a flat plate was studied using a model scaled test apparatus designed to simulate plume/aircraft structure interaction for the cruise configuration. The generic configuration consisted of a rectangular supersonic nozzle of aspect ratio 7, and a large flat plate located beneath the nozzle at various nozzle plate distances; the plate was instrumented to measure surface dynamic pressure and mean wall temperature, with provisions for measurements of acceleration and strain on coupon size panels that could be inserted in the plate. Phase-averaged schlieren measurements revealed the presence of high-intensity acoustic emission from the supersonic plume above the plate, directed upstream; this radiation could be associated with the shock noise generation. Narrow band spectra of surface dynamic pressure show spectral peaks with amplitude levels reaching 1 psi, related to the screech tones. Temperature measurements indicated elevated surface temperatures in regions of high turbulence intensity.
    02/1988;
  • John M. Seiner, James C. Manning, Michael K. Ponton
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    ABSTRACT: This paper examines the effect of both nozzle geometry and scale on the twin supersonic plume resonance phenomenon associated with aircraft having engine nozzle center-to-center spacings less than two diameters. Exit plane near field dynamic pressures were measured for both single and dual nozzle operation in 4.7 percent model and full scale under static conditions. The frequencies associated with this phenomenon were predicted to within 5 percent for a full scale F-15 aircraft. Amplitude levels associated with this phenomenon were found to dominate the dynamic pressure fluctuations in the inter-nozzle region, and reach a level near the structural design limit for this aircraft. The model scale studies, which involved both axisymmetric and rectangular geometry, indicated that amplitude levels could be expected to be much higher in flight. High amplitude levels would likely occur in the overexpanded region for axisymmetric geometry, and in the underexpanded region for rectangular geometry.
    02/1987;
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    M. K. Ponton, J. C. Manning, J. M. Seiner
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    ABSTRACT: The far-field acoustic behavior of supersonic jets produced by four rectangular nozzles with various throat aspect ratios are reported. One nozzle tested was designed for an exit Mach number of 1.66 with throat aspect ratio of 2.0. The remaining three nozzles (throat aspect ratios of 3.7, 5.8, 7.6) were designed for an exit Mach number of 1.35. Acoustic results presented include narrowband spectra and overall sound pressures for numerous operating pressure ratios and spatial locations.
    01/1987;
  • J. M. Seiner, J. C. Manning, M. K. Ponton
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    ABSTRACT: Acoustic property experiments have been conducted to ascertain the behavior of rectangular geometry supersonic nozzles whose throat aspect ratios vary over a 2.0-7.6 range, and whose three partial sidewall geometries range from full to 75-percent cutback. The tests employed unheated air at static conditions for nozzle Mach numbers of 1.35-1.66. It is found that sonic fatigue failures are possible at certain partial sidewall geometries and high nozzle aspect ratios. Unlike axisymmetric supersonic nozzles, shock noise dominates both the rear and forward arc for throat aspect ratio cases greater than 5.6. Jet screech frequency was adequately predicted with a simple vortex sheel model.
    08/1986;
  • J. M. Seiner, J. C. Manning, M. K. Ponton
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    ABSTRACT: Phase-averaged schlieren video and an array of azimuthally oriented microphones were used in the experiments performed to determine the preferred spatial structure associated with supersonic nozzle design for an exhaust Mach number of 2. The jet flow was unheated, chemically inert, and submerged in a static environment, conditions that are satisfactory for the quasi-linear wave-analytical model of Tam and Morris (1980) and Tam and Burton (1984). For general conditions of undeterminate phase-averaged optical records, a conditional sampling method was devised, based on fundamental multimode components. This method uncovers the preferred spatial structure, and shows that in addition to the dominant jet flapping mode, there is also a significant contribution from the axisymmetric mode. Near-field correlations with a moving microphone indicate that the flapping plane is nearly stationary, and not spinning as in the Westley and Wolley (1975) experiment.
    08/1986;
  • J. M. Seiner, J. C. Manning, M. K. Ponton
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    ABSTRACT: The phenomenon of twin supersonic plume resonance is defined and studied as it pertains to high level dynamic loads in the inter-nozzle region of aircraft like the F-15 and B1-A. Using a 1/40th scale model twin jet nacelle with powered choked nozzles, it is found that intense internozzle dynamic pressures are associated with the synchrophased coupling of each plume's jet flapping mode. This condition is found most prevalent when each plume's jet flapping mode has constituent elements composed of the B-type helical instability. Suppression of these fatigue bearing loads was accomplished by simple geometric modifications to only one plume's nozzle. These modifications disrupt the natural selection of the B-type mode and thereby decouple the plumes.
    AIAA Journal 07/1986; · 1.08 Impact Factor