Hélène Klinger

Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France

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Publications (17)91.69 Total impact

  • Parkinsonism & Related Disorders 01/2014; · 3.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Apathy is one of the most common symptoms encountered in Parkinson's disease, and is defined as a lack of motivation accompanied by reduced goal-directed cognition, behaviour and emotional involvement. In a previous study we have described a delayed withdrawal syndrome after successful motor improvement related to subthalamic stimulation allowing for a major decrease in dopaminergic treatment. This withdrawal syndrome correlated with a diffuse mesolimbic dopaminergic denervation. To confirm our hypothesis of parkinsonian apathy being related to mesolimbic dopaminergic denervation, we performed a randomized controlled study using piribedil, a relatively selective D2/D3 dopamine agonist to treat parkinsonian apathy, using the model of postoperative apathy. A 12-week prospective, placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blinded trial was conducted in 37 patients with Parkinson's disease presenting with apathy (Starkstein Apathy Scale score > 14) following subthalamic nucleus stimulation. Patients received either piribedil up to 300 mg per day (n = 19) or placebo (n = 18) for 12 weeks. The primary end point was the improvement of apathy under treatment, as assessed by the reduction of the Starkstein Apathy Scale score in both treatment groups. Secondary end points included alleviation in depression (Beck Depression Inventory), anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory), improvement of quality of life (PDQ39) and anhedonia (Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale). Exploratory endpoints consisted in changes of the Robert Inventory score and Hamilton depression scales. An intention to treat analysis of covariance analysis was performed to compare treatment effects (P < 0.05). The number of premature study dropouts was seven in the placebo and five in the piribedil groups, mostly related to intolerance to hypodopaminergic symptoms. At follow-up evaluation, the apathy score was reduced by 34.6% on piribedil versus 3.2% on placebo (P = 0.015). With piribedil, modifications in the Beck depression and anxiety scores were -19.8% and -22.8%, respectively versus +1.4% and -8.3% with placebo, without reaching significance level. Piribedil led to a trend towards improvement in quality of life (-16.2% versus +6.7% on placebo; P = 0.08) and anhedonia (-49% versus -5.6% on the placebo; P = 0.08). Apathy, assessed by the Robert Inventory score, improved by 46.6% on piribedil and worsened by 2.3% on placebo (P = 0.005). Depression, measured by the Hamilton score, improved in the piribedil group (P = 0.05). No significant side effects were observed. The present study provides a class II evidence of the efficacy of the dopamine agonist piribedil in the treatment of apathy in Parkinson's disease.
    Brain 03/2013; · 9.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Levodopa therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with non-motor complications resulting from sensitisation of the ventral striatum system. Recent studies showed an improvement in non-motor complications in PD patients with subthalamic stimulation. We hypothesised that ventral striatum desensitisation might contribute to this improvement. METHODS: Psychostimulant effects of levodopa were prospectively assessed in 36 PD patients with an acute levodopa challenge, before and 1 year after chronic subthalamic stimulation, using the Addiction Research Centre Inventory euphoria subscale. Postoperative evaluation was performed with the same dose of levodopa used in the preoperative assessment and after switching off stimulation. Preoperative and postoperative non-motor fluctuations in everyday life were investigated with the Ardouin Scale. Furthermore, in order to artificially reproduce non-motor fluctuations, a levodopa challenge keeping subthalamic stimulation on was performed to assess depression, anxiety and motivation before and after surgery under the different medication conditions. RESULTS: After 1 year of chronic subthalamic stimulation with 60.3% reduction in dopaminergic medication, the acute psychostimulant effects of levodopa were significantly reduced compared with preoperatively, as measured by the euphoria subscale (7.22±4.75 vs 4.75±5.68; p=0.0110). On chronic subthalamic stimulation and with markedly reduced dopaminergic medication, non-motor fluctuations were significantly improved. While off medication/on stimulation scores of depression and anxiety were improved, in the on medication/on stimulation condition the motivation score worsened. CONCLUSIONS: Acute psychostimulant effects of levodopa (off stimulation) were significantly reduced 1 year after surgery. These findings are likely due to desensitisation of the ventral striatum, allowed by the reduction of dopaminergic treatment, and the replacement of pulsatile treatment with continuous subthalamic stimulation.
    Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry 09/2012; · 4.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Addictions to dopaminergic drugs or to pleasant behaviours are frequent and potentially devastating neuropsychiatric disorders observed in Parkinson's disease. They encompass impulse control disorders, punding and dopamine dysregulation syndrome. A relationship with dopaminergic treatment is strongly suggested. Subthalamic stimulation improves motor complications and allows for drastic reductions in medication. This treatment might, therefore, be considered for patients with behavioural addictions, when attempts to reduce dopaminergic medication have failed. However, conflicting data have reported suppression, alleviation, worsening or new onset of behavioural addictions after subthalamic stimulation. Non-motor fluctuations are also a disabling feature of the disease. We prospectively investigated behaviour in a cohort of 63 patients with Parkinson's disease, before and 1 year after subthalamic stimulation using the Ardouin scale, with systematic evaluation of functioning in overall appetitive or apathetic modes, non-motor fluctuations, dopaminergic dysregulation syndrome, as well as behavioural addictions (including impulse control disorders and punding) and compulsive use of dopaminergic medication. Defined drug management included immediate postoperative discontinuation of dopamine agonists and reduction in levodopa. Motor and cognitive statuses were controlled (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, Mattis Dementia Rating Scale, frontal score). After surgery, the OFF medication motor score improved (-45.2%), allowing for a 73% reduction in dopaminergic treatment, while overall cognitive evaluation was unchanged. Preoperative dopamine dysregulation syndrome had disappeared in 4/4, behavioural addictions in 17/17 and compulsive dopaminergic medication use in 9/9 patients. New onset of levodopa abuse occurred in one patient with surgical failure. Non-motor fluctuations were significantly reduced with improvements in off-dysphoria (P ≤ 0.001) and reduction in on-euphoria (P ≤ 0.001). There was an inversion in the number of patients functioning in an overall appetitive mode (29 before versus 2 after surgery, P ≤ 0.0001) to an overall apathetic mode (3 before versus 13 after surgery, P < 0.05). Two patients attempted suicide. Improvement in motor fluctuations is linked to the direct effect of stimulation on the sensory-motor subthalamic territory, while improvement in dyskinesias is mainly explained by an indirect effect related to the decrease in dopaminergic drugs. Our data suggest that non-motor fluctuations could similarly be directly alleviated through stimulation of the non-motor subthalamic territories, and hyperdopaminergic side effects might improve mainly due to the decrease in dopaminergic medication. We show an overall improvement in neuropsychiatric symptomatology and propose that disabling non-motor fluctuations, dopaminergic treatment abuse and drug-induced behavioural addictions in Parkinson's disease may be considered as new indications for subthalamic stimulation.
    Brain 04/2012; 135(Pt 5):1463-77. · 9.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present behavioral study re-addresses the question of habit learning in Parkinson's disease (PD). Patients were early onset, non-demented, dopa-responsive, candidates for surgical treatment, similar to those we found earlier as suffering greater dopamine depletion in the putamen than in the caudate nucleus. The task was the same conditional associative learning task as that used previously in monkeys and healthy humans to unveil the striatum involvement in habit learning. Sixteen patients and 20 age- and education-matched healthy control subjects learned sets of 3 visuo-motor associations between complex patterns and joystick displacements during two testing sessions separated by a few hours. We distinguished errors preceding vs. following the first correct response to compare patients' performance during the earliest phase of learning dominated by goal-directed actions with that observed later on, when responses start to become habitual. The disease significantly retarded both learning phases, especially in patients under 60 years of age. However, only the late phase deficit was disease severity-dependent and persisted on the second testing session. These findings provide the first corroboration in Parkinson patients of two ideas well-established in the animal literature. The first is the idea that associating visual stimuli to motor acts is a form of habit learning that engages the striatum. It is confirmed here by the global impairment in visuo-motor learning induced by PD. The second idea is that goal-directed behaviors are predominantly caudate-dependent whereas habitual responses are primarily putamen-dependent. At the advanced PD stages tested here, dopamine depletion is greater in the putamen than in the caudate nucleus. Accordingly, the late phase of learning corresponding to the emergence of habitual responses was more vulnerable to the disease than the early phase dominated by goal-directed actions.
    Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 01/2012; 6:351. · 2.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Depression is frequent in Parkinson's disease, but its pathophysiology remains unclear. Two recent studies have investigated the role of serotonergic system at the presynaptic level. The objective of the present study was to use positron emission tomography and [(18)F]MPPF to investigate the role of postsynaptic serotonergic system dysfunction in the pathophysiology of depression in Parkinson's disease. Four parkinsonian patients with depression and 8 parkinsonian patients without depression were enrolled. Each patient underwent a scan using [(18)F]MPPF, a selective serotonin 1A receptor antagonist. Voxel-by-voxel statistical comparison of [(18)F]MPPF uptake of the 2 groups of parkinsonian patients and with 7 matched normal subjects was made using statistical parametric mapping (P uncorrected < .001). Compared with nondepressed parkinsonian patients, depressed patients exhibited reduced tracer uptake in the left hippocampus, the right insula, the left superior temporal cortex, and the orbitofrontal cortex. Compared with controls, nondepressed parkinsonian patients presented reduced [(18)F]MPPF uptake bilaterally in the inferior frontal cortex as well as in the right ventral striatum and insula. Compared with controls, [(18)F]MPPF uptake was decreased in depressed parkinsonian patients in the left dorsal anterior cingulate and orbitofrontal cortices, in the right hippocampic region, and in the temporal cortex. The present imaging study suggests that abnormalities in serotonin 1A receptor neurotransmission in the limbic system may be involved in the neural mechanisms underlying depression in patients with Parkinson's disease.
    Movement Disorders 01/2012; 27(1):84-9. · 5.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Behavioral changes in Parkinson's disease are complex and their pathophysiology is not yet fully understood. The dopaminergic system seems to play a major role and most of the behavioral disorders in Parkinson's disease can be classified into either hypodopaminergic if related to the disease itself or hyperdopaminergic if related to dopaminergic treatment. Subthalamic stimulation, which enables withdrawal of dopaminergic medication at an advanced stage in the disease, provides a model for the study of certain nonmotor, dopamine-sensitive symptoms. Such a study has shown that apathy, which is the most frequent behavioral problem in Parkinson's disease, is part of a much broader hypodopaminergic behavioral syndrome which also includes anxiety and depression. Nonmotor fluctuations--essential fluctuations in the patient's psychological state--are an expression of mesolimbic denervation, as shown in positron emission tomography. Drug-induced sensitization of the denervated mesolimbic system accounts for hyperdopaminergic behavioral problems that encompass impulse control disorders that can be alternatively classified as behavioral addictions. The association of impulse control disorders and addiction to the dopaminergic medication has been called dopamine dysregulation syndrome. While L-dopa is the most effective treatment for motor symptoms, dopamine agonists are more effective in improving the nonmotor levodopa-sensitive symptoms. On the other hand, L-dopa induces more motor complications and dopamine agonist more behavioral side effects. There is increasing data and awareness that patients' quality of life appears to be dictated by hypo- and hyperdopaminergic psychological symptoms stemming from mesolimbic denervation and dopaminergic treatment rather than by motor symptoms and motor complications related to nigrostriatal denervation and dopaminergic treatment. Better management requires knowledge of the clinical syndromes of hyper- and hypodopaminergic behaviors and nonmotor fluctuations, a better understanding of their underlying mechanisms and the development of new evaluation tools for these nonmotor symptoms. The neurologist who strives to gain mastery of dopaminergic treatment needs to fine tune the dosage of levodopa and dopamine agonists on an individual basis, depending on the presence of motor and nonmotor signs respectively.
    Revue Neurologique 10/2010; 166(10):816-21. · 0.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Apathy has been reported to occur after subthalamic nucleus stimulation, a treatment of motor complications in advanced Parkinson's disease. We carried out a prospective study of the occurrence of apathy and associated symptoms, predictors and mechanisms in the year following subthalamic stimulation. Dopamine agonist drugs were discontinued immediately after surgery and levodopa was markedly reduced within 2 weeks. Apathy and depression were assessed monthly, using the Starkstein apathy scale and the Beck Depression Inventory. Dopamine agonists were re-introduced if patients developed apathy or depression. Preoperative non-motor fluctuations were evaluated using the Ardouin Scale. Depression, apathy and anxiety were evaluated both on and off levodopa. Analysis of predictors of apathy was performed using a Cox proportional hazard model. Twelve patients who developed apathy and a control group of 13 patients who did not underwent [11C]-raclopride positron emission tomography scanning before and after oral intake of methylphenidate. In 63 patients with Parkinson's disease treated with subthalamic stimulation, dopaminergic treatment was decreased by 82% after surgery. Apathy occurred after a mean of 4.7 (3.3-8.2) months in 34 patients and was reversible in half of these by the 12-month follow-up. Seventeen patients developed transient depression after 5.7 (4.7-9.3) months and these fell into the apathy group with one single exception. At baseline, fluctuations in depression, apathy and anxiety scores were greater in the group with apathy. Fluctuations in apathy, depression and anxiety ratings during a baseline levodopa challenge were also significant predictors of postoperative apathy in univariate analysis, but not motor and cognitive states or the level of reduction of dopaminergic medication. The multivariate model identified non-motor fluctuations in everyday life and anxiety score during the baseline levodopa challenge as two independent significant predictors of postoperative apathy. Without methylphenidate, [11C]-raclopride binding potential values were greater in apathetic patients bilaterally in the orbitofrontal, dorsolateral prefrontal, posterior cingulate and temporal cortices, left striatum and right amygdala, reflecting greater dopamine D2/D3 receptor density and/or reduced synaptic dopamine level in these areas. The variations of [11C]-raclopride binding potential values induced by methylphenidate were greater in non-apathetic patients in the left orbitofrontal cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, thalamus and internal globus pallidus and bilaterally in the anterior and posterior cingulate cortices, consistent with a more important capacity to release dopamine. Non-motor fluctuations are related to mesolimbic dopaminergic denervation. Apathy, depression and anxiety can occur after surgery as a delayed dopamine withdrawal syndrome. A varying extent of mesolimbic dopaminergic denervation and differences in dopaminergic treatment largely determine mood, anxiety and motivation in patients with Parkinson's disease, contributing to different non-motor phenotypes.
    Brain 03/2010; 133(Pt 4):1111-27. · 9.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: IntroductionBehavioral changes in Parkinson's disease are complex and their pathophysiology is not yet fully understood. The dopaminergic system seems to play a major role and most of the behavioral disorders in Parkinson's disease can be classified into either hypodopaminergic if related to the disease itself or hyperdopaminergic if related to dopaminergic treatment.State of the artSubthalamic stimulation, which enables withdrawal of dopaminergic medication at an advanced stage in the disease, provides a model for the study of certain nonmotor, dopamine-sensitive symptoms. Such a study has shown that apathy, which is the most frequent behavioral problem in Parkinson's disease, is part of a much broader hypodopaminergic behavioral syndrome which also includes anxiety and depression. Nonmotor fluctuations – essentially fluctuations in the patient's psychological state – are an expression of mesolimbic denervation, as shown in positron emission tomography. Drug-induced sensitization of the denervated mesolimbic system accounts for hyperdopaminergic behavioral problems that encompass impulse control disorders that can be alternatively classified as behavioral addictions. The association of impulse control disorders and addiction to the dopaminergic medication has been called dopamine dysregulation syndrome. While L-dopa is the most effective treatment for motor symptoms, dopamine agonists are more effective in improving the nonmotor levodopa-sensitive symptoms. On the other hand, L-dopa induces more motor complications and dopamine agonist more behavioral side effects. There is increasing data and awareness that patients’ quality of life appears to be dictated by hypo- and hyperdopaminergic psychological symptoms stemming from mesolimbic denervation and dopaminergic treatment rather than by motor symptoms and motor complications related to nigrostriatal denervation and dopaminergic treatment.PerspectivesBetter management requires knowledge of the clinical syndromes of hyper- and hypodopaminergic behaviors and nonmotor fluctuations, a better understanding of their underlying mechanisms and the development of new evaluation tools for these nonmotor symptoms.Conclusions The neurologist who strives to gain mastery of dopaminergic treatment needs to fine tune the dosage of levodopa and dopamine agonists on an individual basis, depending on the presence of motor and nonmotor signs respectively.
    Revue Neurologique 01/2010; 166(10):816-821. · 0.51 Impact Factor
  • Revue Neurologique - REV NEUROL. 01/2010; 166.
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    ABSTRACT: Cerebral palsy (CP) with dystonia-choreoathetosis is a common cause of disability in children and in adults, and responds poorly to medical treatment. Bilateral pallidal deep brain stimulation (BP-DBS) of the globus pallidus internus (GPi) is an effective treatment for primary dystonia, but the effect of this reversible surgical procedure on dystonia-choreoathetosis CP, which is a subtype of secondary dystonia, is unknown. Our aim was to test the effectiveness of BP-DBS in adults with dystonia-choreoathetosis CP. We did a multicentre prospective pilot study of BP-DBS in 13 adults with dystonia-choreoathetosis CP who had no cognitive impairment, little spasticity, and only slight abnormalities of the basal ganglia on MRI. The primary endpoint was change in the severity of dystonia-choreoathetosis after 1 year of neurostimulation, as assessed with the Burke-Fahn-Marsden dystonia rating scale. The accuracy of surgical targeting to the GPi was assessed masked to the results of neurostimulation. Analysis was by intention to treat. The mean Burke-Fahn-Marsden dystonia rating scale movement score improved from 44.2 (SD 21.1) before surgery to 34.7 (21.9) at 1 year post-operatively (p=0.009; mean improvement 24.4 [21.1]%, 95% CI 11.6-37.1). Functional disability, pain, and mental health-related quality of life were significantly improved. There was no worsening of cognition or mood. Adverse events were related to stimulation (arrest of the stimulator in one patient, and an adjustment to the current intensity in four patients). The optimum therapeutic target was the posterolateroventral region of the GPi. Little improvement was seen when the neurostimulation diffused to adjacent structures (mainly to the globus pallidus externus [GPe]). Bilateral pallidal neurostimulation could be an effective treatment option for patients with dystonia-choreoathetosis CP. However, given the heterogeneity of motor outcomes and the small sample size, results should be interpreted with caution. The optimum placement of the leads seemed to be a crucial, but not exclusive, factor that could affect a good outcome. National PHRC; Cerebral Palsy Foundation: Fondation Motrice/APETREIMC; French INSERM Dystonia National Network; Medtronic.
    The Lancet Neurology 09/2009; 8(8):709-17. · 23.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the long-term efficacy and safety of bilateral subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). 42 consecutive patients with idiopathic PD treated with bilateral STN stimulation were enrolled. Parkinsonian status, medication intake and neuropsychological evaluation were assessed preoperatively and at 1 and 5 years postoperatively in on and off medication/on and off stimulation conditions. 23 patients could be followed-up 5 years after surgery. In the remaining cases, 5 died, 1 could not be assessed because of device removal for infection, 1 decided not to be stimulated, and 11 were lost of follow-up (one because of a liver carcinoma and the others because they refused the formal four conditions of assessment). STN stimulation reduced the UPDRS motor score by 55 % compared to baseline in the off-medication conditions. Tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, postural stability, and gait improved by 74 %, 66 %, 59 %, 17 % and 37 %, respectively. UPDRS part II scores were reduced by 38 %. The dopaminergic treatment daily dose was reduced by 54.4 % after surgery. Axial dopa-unresponsive signs worsened in some patients. Among the 42 initial patients we observed the following: 2 brain hemorrhages, 3 infections of the device, 2 phlebitis and 1 pulmonary embolism. In addition, 2 patients needed a repositioning of the electrode. Among the 23 patients followed at 5 years, long lasting side effects consisted in dysarthria (56 %), depression (39 %), eyelid opening apraxia (30.4 %) and apathy (4.3 %). Our data confirm that bilateral STN stimulation is beneficial in the long-term for PD patients but does not prevent disease progression and the occurence of axial levodopa unresponsive signs in some patients.
    Journal of Neurology 03/2009; 256(2):225-33. · 3.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the long-term efficacy and safety of chronic bilateral stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). 36 consecutive patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease treated with bilateral stimulation of the STN were studied. Parkinsonian status was assessed preoperatively and at 1 and 3 years postoperatively using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and neuropsychological evaluation in on and off-medication / on and off stimulation conditions. At 3 years follow-up, STN stimulation reduced the UPDRS motor score by 54.2 % compared to baseline in the off-medication conditions. Tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, postural stability, and gait improved by 72.2 %, 62.4 %, 56.8 %, 40.5 % and 45.3 %, respectively. UPDRS part II scores were reduced by 41.4 %. The overall dopaminergic drugs dose was reduced by 48.6 % after surgery and four patients were no longer taking antiparkinsonian medication at three years. However, axial dopa-unresponsive signs worsened in some patients. The most frequent transient adverse event consisted in mood disorders in 23 patients. Our data demonstrate that: 1) bilateral STN stimulation is relatively safe, improves the motor symptoms and drug-related motor complications of PD, and reduces the daily dosage of medication; 2) this benefit is sustained over time despite the occurrence of axial doparesistant signs in some patients.
    Journal of Neurology 02/2007; 254(1):99-106. · 3.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Long term effects of subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation on cognition, mood, and behaviour are unknown. This study evaluated the cognitive, mood, and behavioural effects of bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) followed up for three years. A consecutive series of 77 PD patients was assessed before, one, and three years after surgery. Mean (SD) age at surgery was 55 (8). Seven patients died or were lost for follow up. Neuropsychological assessment included a global cognitive scale, memory, and frontal tests. Depression was evaluated using the Beck depression inventory. Assessment of thought disorders and apathy was based on the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale. Reports of the behavioural changes are mainly based on interviews done by the same neuropsychologist at each follow up. Only two cognitive variables worsened (category fluency, total score of fluency). Age was a predictor of decline in executive functions. Depression improved whereas apathy and thought disorders worsened. Major behavioural changes were two transient aggressive impulsive episodes, one suicide, four suicide attempts, one permanent apathy, one transient severe depression, four psychoses (one permanent), and five hypomania (one permanent). Comparing baseline, one year, and three year postoperative assessments, STN stimulation did not lead to global cognitive deterioration. Apathy scores mildly increased. Depression scores mildly improved. Behavioural changes were comparatively rare and mostly transient. Single case reports show the major synergistic effects of both medication and stimulation on mood and behaviour, illustrating the importance of a correct postoperative management.
    Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery &amp Psychiatry 07/2004; 75(6):834-9. · 4.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In a previous study on a consecutive series of 62 patients with PD, the authors showed that bilateral subthalamic or pallidal continuous high-frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) affects neither memory nor executive functions 3 to 6 months after surgery. To investigate the specific effects of DBS by comparing the performance of patients with the stimulator turned "on" and "off." The performance of 56 patients on clinical tests of executive function was compared after 3 and 12 months of DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN; n = 48) or the internal globus pallidus (GPi; n = 8) with the stimulator "on" or "off." Global intellectual efficiency, verbal learning, and mood were also evaluated with the stimulator "on." The performance of another group of 20 patients was compared after 6 months of DBS of the STN (n = 15) or the GPi (n = 5) with the stimulator "on" or "off" on more experimental tests recently shown to be more sensitive to l-dopa therapy. When the stimulator was "on," STN patients showed a mild but significant improvement in psychomotor speed and working memory. In comparison with the presurgical state, STN patients had no cognitive deficit at 12 months, except for lexical fluency. There was no differential effect of STN or GPi stimulation. 1) The specific effect of DBS seems to mimic the action of l-dopa treatment in the cognitive as in the motor domain; 2) the surgery associated with DBS does not appear to affect the cognitive performance of patients with PD 12 months later, except for a mild deficit in lexical fluency.
    Neurology 09/2000; 55(3):411-8. · 8.25 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

643 Citations
91.69 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2013
    • Hospices Civils de Lyon
      Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France
  • 2012
    • University Joseph Fourier - Grenoble 1
      Grenoble, Rhône-Alpes, France
    • Lyon Neuroscience Research Center
      Lyons, Rhône-Alpes, France
    • French National Centre for Scientific Research
      • Centre de Neurosciences Cognitives (CNC)
      Paris, Ile-de-France, France
  • 2004–2012
    • Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Grenoble
      • Service de Neurologie
      Grenoble, Rhône-Alpes, France
  • 2007
    • Claude Bernard University Lyon 1
      • Service de neurologie
      Villeurbanne, Rhone-Alpes, France