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Publications (2)13.16 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Mutant lines covering all Arabidopsis genes allow us to pursue systematic functional genomics. A comprehensive phenotype description, called a phenome, is highly sought after in the profiling of -omics data. We selected 4000 transposon-insertional lines with transposon insertions in their gene-coding regions, and systematically observed the visible phenotype of each line. For the first 3 weeks after germination, plants were grown on agar plates and the juvenile phenotypes were recorded. Then the plants were transferred to soil and their phenotypes were recorded at each growth stage. About 140 lines showed clear and reproducible visible phenotypes, including novel phenotypic mutants as well as previously reported ones. All descriptions of the mutants showing visible phenotypes were classified into eight primary categories (seedling, leaves, flowering and growth, stems, branching, flowers, siliques and seed yield) and 43 secondary categories of morphological phenotypes. Phenotypic images have been entered into a searchable database (http://rarge.gsc.riken.jp/phenome/). One example investigated through the use of plural alleles was a mutant of a novel gene related to glycerolipid biosynthesis, with a unique visible phenotype of sepal opening. Our results suggest that we can find more novel visible phenotypes and their corresponding genes, and that phenotypic mutants of gene knockouts are not exhausted yet. This study provides basic data on large-scale phenotyping of gene knockout lines in plants, and will contribute to the completion of an international effort to develop a phenome database of all the functional genes in Arabidopsis.
    The Plant Journal 09/2006; 47(4):640-51. · 6.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: More than 10 000 transposon-tagged lines were constructed by using the Activator (Ac)/Dissociation (Ds) system in order to collect insertional mutants as a useful resource for functional genomics of Arabidopsis. The flanking sequences of the Ds element in the 11 800 independent lines were determined by high-throughput analysis using a semi-automated method. The sequence data allowed us to map the unique insertion site on the Arabidopsis genome in each line. The Ds element of 7566 lines is inserted in or close to coding regions, potentially affecting the function of 5031 of 25 000 Arabidopsis genes. Half of the lines have Ds insertions on chromosome 1 (Chr. 1), in which donor lines have a donor site. In the other half, the Ds insertions are distributed throughout the other four chromosomes. The intrachromosomal distribution of Ds insertions varies with the donor lines. We found that there are hot spots for Ds transposition near the ends of every chromosome, and we found some statistical preference for Ds insertion targets at the nucleotide level. On the basis of systematic analysis of the Ds insertion sites in the 11 800 lines, we propose the use of Ds-tagged lines with a single insertion in annotated genes for systematic analysis of phenotypes (phenome analysis) in functional genomics. We have opened a searchable database of the insertion-site sequences and mutated genes (http://rarge.gsc.riken.go.jp/) and are depositing these lines in the RIKEN BioResource Center as available resources (http://www.brc.riken.go.jp/Eng/).
    The Plant Journal 04/2004; 37(6):897-905. · 6.58 Impact Factor