Heini Hartikka

University of Oulu, Uleoborg, Oulu, Finland

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Publications (6)21.5 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Primary osteoporosis is a rare childhood-onset skeletal condition whose pathogenesis has been largely unknown. We have previously shown that primary osteoporosis can be caused by heterozygous missense mutations in the Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene, and the role of LRP5 is further investigated here. LRP5 was analyzed in 18 otherwise healthy children and adolescents who had evidence of osteoporosis (manifested as reduced bone mineral density i.e. BMD, recurrent peripheral fractures and/or vertebral compression fractures) but who lacked the clinical features of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) or other known syndromes linked to low BMD. Also 51 controls were analyzed. Methods used in the genetic analyses included direct sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). In vitro studies were performed using luciferase assay and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to examine the effect of two novel and three previously identified mutations on the activity of canonical Wnt signaling and on expression of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-Htr1b). Two novel LRP5 mutations (c.3446 T > A; p.L1149Q and c.3553 G > A; p.G1185R) were identified in two patients and their affected family members. In vitro analyses showed that one of these novel mutations together with two previously reported mutations (p.C913fs, p.R1036Q) significantly reduced the activity of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Such reductions may lead to decreased bone formation, and could explain the bone phenotype. Gut-derived Lrp5 has been shown to regulate serotonin synthesis by controlling the production of serotonin rate-limiting enzyme, Tph1. LRP5 mutations did not affect Tph1 expression, and only one mutant (p.L1149Q) reduced expression of serotonin receptor 5-Htr1b (p < 0.002). Our results provide additional information on the role of LRP5 mutations and their effects on the development of juvenile-onset primary osteoporosis, and hence the pathogenesis of the disorder. The mutations causing primary osteoporosis reduce the signaling activity of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and may therefore result in decreased bone formation. The specific mechanism affecting signaling activity remains to be resolved in future studies.
    BMC Medical Genetics 04/2012; 13:26. DOI:10.1186/1471-2350-13-26 · 2.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Stress fractures are a significant problem among athletes and soldiers and may result in devastating complications or even permanent handicap. Genetic factors may increase the risk, but no major susceptibility genes have been identified. The purpose of this study was to search for possible genetic factors predisposing military conscripts to femoral neck stress fractures. Eight genes involved in bone metabolism or pathology (COL1A1, COL1A2, OPG, ESR1, VDR, CTR, LRP5, IL-6) were examined in 72 military conscripts with a femoral neck stress fracture and 120 controls. The risk of femoral neck stress fracture was significantly higher in subjects with low weight and body mass index (BMI). An interaction between the CTR (rs1801197) minor allele C and the VDR C-A haplotype was observed, and subjects lacking the C allele in CTR and/or the C-A haplotype in VDR had a 3-fold higher risk of stress fracture than subjects carrying both (OR = 3.22, 95% CI 1.38-7.49, p = 0.007). In addition, the LRP5 haplotype A-G-G-C alone and in combination with the VDR haplotype C-A was associated with stress fractures through reduced body weight and BMI. Our findings suggest that genetic factors play a role in the development of stress fractures in individuals subjected to heavy exercise and mechanical loading. The present results can be applied to the design of future studies that will further elucidate the genetics of stress fractures.
    BMC Genetics 10/2010; 11(1):95. DOI:10.1186/1471-2156-11-95 · 2.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a generalized disorder of connective tissue characterized by fragile bones and easy susceptibility to fracture. Most cases of OI are caused by mutations in type I collagen. We have identified and assembled structural mutations in type I collagen genes (COL1A1 and COL1A2, encoding the proalpha1(I) and proalpha2(I) chains, respectively) that result in OI. Quantitative defects causing type I OI were not included. Of these 832 independent mutations, 682 result in substitution for glycine residues in the triple helical domain of the encoded protein and 150 alter splice sites. Distinct genotype-phenotype relationships emerge for each chain. One-third of the mutations that result in glycine substitutions in alpha1(I) are lethal, especially when the substituting residues are charged or have a branched side chain. Substitutions in the first 200 residues are nonlethal and have variable outcome thereafter, unrelated to folding or helix stability domains. Two exclusively lethal regions (helix positions 691-823 and 910-964) align with major ligand binding regions (MLBRs), suggesting crucial interactions of collagen monomers or fibrils with integrins, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), fibronectin, and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). Mutations in COL1A2 are predominantly nonlethal (80%). Lethal substitutions are located in eight regularly spaced clusters along the chain, supporting a regional model. The lethal regions align with proteoglycan binding sites along the fibril, suggesting a role in fibril-matrix interactions. Recurrences at the same site in alpha2(I) are generally concordant for outcome, unlike alpha1(I). Splice site mutations comprise 20% of helical mutations identified in OI patients, and may lead to exon skipping, intron inclusion, or the activation of cryptic splice sites. Splice site mutations in COL1A1 are rarely lethal; they often lead to frameshifts and the mild type I phenotype. In alpha2(I), lethal exon skipping events are located in the carboxyl half of the chain. Our data on genotype-phenotype relationships indicate that the two collagen chains play very different roles in matrix integrity and that phenotype depends on intracellular and extracellular events.
    Human Mutation 03/2007; 28(3):209-21. DOI:10.1002/humu.20429 · 5.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Three of 20 patients with juvenile osteoporosis were found to have a heterozygous mutation in the LRP5 gene. No mutations were found in the type I collagen genes. Mutations in the other family members with similar bone phenotype confirmed that LRP5 has a role in both juvenile and adult osteoporosis. The gene encoding the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene has recently been shown to affect bone mass accrual during growth and to be involved in osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome and a high bone mass phenotype. Mutations in the type I collagen genes (COL1A1 and COL1A2) are known to cause osteogenesis imperfecta, characterized by increased bone fragility. Here we analyzed COL1A1, COL1A2, and LRP5 for mutations in 20 pediatric patients with primary osteoporosis characterized by low BMD, recurrent fractures, and absent extraskeletal manifestations. No mutations were detected in the type I collagen genes, but two missense mutations (A29T and R1036Q) and one frameshift mutation (C913fs) were found in the LRP5 gene in three of the patients. The frameshift mutation was also seen in the proband's father and brother, who both were found to have significant osteoporosis. R1036Q was observed in the proband's mother and two brothers, who all had osteoporosis. These results indicate that heterozygous mutations in the LRP5 gene can cause osteoporosis in both children and adults.
    Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 06/2005; 20(5):783-9. DOI:10.1359/JBMR.050101 · 6.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is caused by mutations in COL1A1 and COL1A2 that code for the α1 and α2 chains of type I collagen. Phenotypes correlate with the mutation types in that COL1A1 null mutations lead to OI type I, and structural mutations in α1(I) or α2(I) lead to more severe OI types (II–IV). However, correlative analysis between mutation types and OI associated hearing loss has not been previously performed. A total of 54 Finnish OI patients with previously diagnosed hearing loss or age 35 or more years were analyzed here for mutations in COL1A1 or COL1A2. Altogether 49 mutations were identified, of which 41 were novel. The 49 mutations represented the molecular genetic background of 41.1% of the Finnish OI population. A total of 38 mutations were in COL1A1 and 11 were in COL1A2. Of these, 16 were glycine substitutions and 16 were splicing mutations in α1(I) or α2(I). In addition, 17 null allele mutations were detected in COL1A1. A total of 32 patients (65.3%) with a mutation had hearing loss. That is slightly more than in our previous population study on Finnish adults with OI (57.9%). The association between the mutation types and OI type was statistically evident. Patients with COL1A1 mutations more frequently had blue scleras than those with COL1A2 mutations. In addition, patients with COL1A2 mutations tended to be shorter than those with COL1A1 mutations. However, no correlation was found between the mutated gene or mutation type and hearing pattern. These results suggest that the basis of hearing loss in OI is complex, and it is a result of multifactorial, still unknown genetic effects. Hum Mutat 24:147–154, 2004.
    Human Mutation 11/2004; 24(2):147-54. DOI:10.1002/humu.20071 · 5.05 Impact Factor
  • Heini. Hartikka
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    ABSTRACT: Diss. -- Oulun yliopisto.