Are you Gholam-Hossein Nouroozinejad?

Claim your profile

Publications (2)5.49 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: It has been reported that autism is a hypoglutamatergic disorder. Therefore, it was of interest to assess the efficacy of piracetam, a positive modulator of AMPA-sensitive glutamate receptors in autistic disorder. About 40 children between the ages three and 11 years (inclusive) with a DSM IV clinical diagnosis of autism and who were outpatients from a specialty clinic for children were recruited. The children presented with a chief complaint of severely disruptive symptoms related to autistic disorder. Patients were randomly allocated to piracetam + risperidone (Group A) or placebo + risperidone (Group B) for a 10-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. The dose of risperidone was titrated up to 2 mg/day for children between 10 and 40 kg and 3 mg/day for children weighting above 40 kg. The dose of piracetam was titrated up to 800 mg/day. Patients were assessed at baseline and after 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 weeks of starting medication. The measure of the outcome was the Aberrant Behavior Checklist-Community (ABC-C) Rating Scale (total score). The ABC-C Rating Scale scores improved with piracetam. The difference between the two protocols was significant as indicated by the effect of group, the between subjects factor (F = 5.85, d.f. = 1, P = 0.02). The changes at the endpoint compared with baseline were: -11.90 +/- 3.79 (mean +/- SD) and -5.15 +/- 3.04 for group A and B respectively. A significant difference was observed on the change in scores in the ABC-C Rating Scale in week 10 compared with baseline in the two groups (t = 6.017, d.f. = 38, P < 0.0001). The results suggest that a combination of atypical antipsychotic medications and a glutamate agent such as piracetam, might have increase synergistic effects in the treatment of autism.
    Child Psychiatry and Human Development 09/2008; 39(3):237-45. · 1.93 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is the most prevalent psychiatric disorder currently afflicting children and is among the most common chronic conditions affecting school-age children. Modafinil is structurally different from the psychostimulants that are typically used to treat ADHD and has been reported to be effective in improving the symptoms of ADHD. The aim of the present study was to further evaluate, under double blind and controlled conditions, the efficacy of modafinil for ADHD in children and adolescents as compared to methylphenidate. Patients included 60 outpatients, children (47 boys and 13 girls) between the ages of 6-15 who clearly met the DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for ADHD. Subjects were recruited from an outpatient child and adolescent clinic for a 6 week double blind, randomized clinical trial. All study subjects were randomly assigned to receive either treatment with modafinil film coated tablet (in doses of 200-300 mg/day) depending on weight (200 mg/day for <30 kg and 300 mg/day for >30 kg) (group 1) or methylphenidate (in doses of 20-30 mg/day) depending on weight (20 mg/day for <30 kg and 30 mg/day for >30 kg) (group 2). The principal measure of outcome was the Teacher and Parent ADHD Rating Scale-IV. Patients were assessed at baseline and at 21 and 42 days after the medication started. No significant differences were observed between the two groups on the Parent and Teacher Rating Scale scores. Side effects of decreased appetite and difficulty falling asleep were observed more in the methylphenidate group. The results of this study indicate that modafinil significantly improved symptoms of ADHD and was well tolerated and it is beneficial in the treatment of children with ADHD.
    Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry 02/2008; 32(1):145-9. · 3.55 Impact Factor