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Publications (10)3.1 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Our external appearance plays a key role in everyday life's social interactions. Hence, taking care of our appearance allows us to adjust and protect ourselves, as well as communicate emotional disposition (i.e. sympathy or aversion) and social information (i.e. values, status). However, some discrete body parts or characteristics appear to be more salient than others in contributing to global body image. For example, authors showed that facial attractiveness is one of the best predictors of overall physical attractiveness and represent one of the primary factors influencing global self-esteem. Make-up is therefore ought to play a major influence in these parameters. Moreover, in a previous study whose subject was to explain the reasons that motivate women to make-up, we showed a high implication of specific psychological traits in correlation with two make-up functions (i.e. psycho-behavioural profiles 'Seduction' and 'Camouflage'; group S and group C, respectively). The purpose of this study was to assess the possible relation between our two psycho-behavioural profiles and some morphological parameters know to be involved in facial attraction (i.e. facial asymmetry and skin visual quality). First of all, our study revealed for women from the group C a greater asymmetry of the lower face (i.e. mouth area) that could be related to a possible larger amount of negative emotional experiences. Concerning make-up behaviour, women from the group S more extensively manipulated their relative facial attractiveness, by using a large range of colours, but also through a significantly longer make-up process used to adjust their visual asymmetry and therefore increase their potential of attractiveness. On the overall, our results suggest that make-up is used differentially, according to stable psychological profiles of women, to manipulate specific visual/morphological facial features involved in attractiveness.
    International journal of cosmetic science 02/2011; 33(4):338-45.
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    ABSTRACT: As far as women are concerned, numerous visual and sensory criteria are involved in the subjective phenomenon of skin firmness and elasticity. Apart from their interactions, these criteria complicate the instrumental approach because principal measuring techniques focus on the analysis of small surface areas. Based on this theoretical background, we have developed a new instrument-related approach that uses infrared thermography connected to a mechanical deformation system. Overall, our approach has proved to be relevant in characterizing the perceptual phenomenon of skin elasticity and firmness. On the one hand, our validation study highlighted an excellent correlation with certain parameters measured using one of the instrument reference methods, the Cutometer. On the other hand, the results showed that our data were consistent with the volunteer’s subjective assessment.
    26th IFSCC congress; 09/2010
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    ABSTRACT: SynopsisMakeup acts and stimulates three of our senses: touch (which encompasses all sensations from the body surface), smell (fragrance), and sight (the process of becoming and looking beautiful). The positive stimulation of these senses by makeup can induce sensory as well as psychological pleasure. In order to understand the relationship of women to their makeup, we interviewed different groups of women on their quality of life and makeup habits. Then, through four standard well-validated psychometric self-questionnaires, we examined the possible relation between the need to make up oneself and specific psychological features. Our first results clearly showed that makeup could support two opposite ‘up’ functions, i.e., ‘camouflage’ vs. ‘seduction.’ Concerning their psychological profiles, results showed that women of the functional class ‘camouflage’ are more anxious, defensive, and emotionally unstable compared to those of the functional class ‘seduction,’ who appear to be more sociable, assertive, and extroverted. Further analyses revealed a division of the two classes into subclasses of volunteers with opposed personality and psychological profiles. This new classification allowed us to define more precisely the relations existing within the subjective experience of women during the makeup process. In conclusion, our study revealed that beyond the simple application of colorful products on the face, makeup has two major functional implications depending on specific psychological profiles of women.
    International journal of cosmetic science 02/2009; 31(2):156 - 157.
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    ABSTRACT: The individual perception of the radiance is difficult to define and quantify because it often includes physiological and psychological attributes. Although if they are differences in the perception of the skin radiance, dermatologists and experts in cosmetology consider that the complexion must reflect the general health of an individual. The aim of this work was to determine existing conditions of skin radiance via digital image analysis, consumer's perception and experts' evaluation, and propose a mathematical model to quantify the global radiance phenomenon. A round table meeting was organized in order to have free discussions about skin radiance. The qualitative assessment of skin radiance was carried out using a self-assessment questionnaire constructed according to the information obtained from the round table meeting. A simplified version of this questionnaire was proposed to experts. One hundred female subjects belonging to three different age groups (20-30, 30-40, 40-50 and >50 years old) participated in the study. Facial images were taken using a video imaging with visual control system to ensure consistency of images among volunteers. From these images, algorithms based on the principle of polynomial approximation, segmentation by maximalization of the entropy and the Logarithmic Image Processing model were required to extract skin radiance parameters. Multiple regression analysis was used to establish, via consumer's perception of the skin radiance and experts' evaluation studies, the degree to which each of the independent parameters contributes to the skin radiance perception. All the items of the self-assessment questionnaire explained 74% of the variation of the skin radiance. Data from experts' analysis explained 87% of the variation of skin radiance. In the two cases, skin radiance appeared to be independent of age and the presence of wrinkles. From the image analysis, we observed that the skin surface parameters explained 20% of the variation of the skin radiance expressed by experts and 24% of the variation of the skin radiance expressed by volunteers. As a result, about 80% of the variation is not explained by the instrumental data. If we combine experts' analysis and instrumental data, we obtain a mathematical model that explains 92% of the variation of the skin radiance. The questionnaire constructed from this brainstorming session allowed volunteers and experts to judge their perception of skin radiance more precisely. Video imaging appears as an interesting method to quantify visual properties of the skin and to visualize what the consumer perceives of skin radiance. However, the mathematical model proposed from the skin surface parameters analysis does not totally explain the global perception of skin radiance. In the future, it will be necessary to develop new data-processing programs to quantify subjective parameters in order to validate our mathematical model.
    Skin Research and Technology 11/2006; 12(4):254-60. · 1.41 Impact Factor
  • 24th IFSCC congress; 10/2006
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this work was to develop a new sensor for objective in vivo measurement of the cutaneous temperature based on micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), and to compare these performances with those of a classical thermocouple. Research on this new sensor was carried out to allow the quantification of the thermal properties of the made-up skin. Sixteen female subjects divided into two different age groups (18-35 and >50 years old) were recruited for this study. Several zones of the face and forearms were made up at random with foundations containing or not a thermoregulator raw material. The quantity of foundation applied on the skin was standardized and measurements were carried out first before make-up, and then 10 s and 5 min after make-up. The new sensor and the thermocouple were used successively on each zone. The cutaneous temperature was expressed in degrees celsius. The two systems are similar in terms of repeatability and reproducibility, with some differences in sensibility. The data measured by the MEMS sensor appear lower than those measured by the thermocouple. After make-up, the MEMS sensor detects a progressive increase of the temperature in time whereas the thermocouple detects a decrease. We found the same evolution on the face but in a more attenuated way. These results tend to show that the devices do not measure the same phenomenon. The thermocouple appears more sensitive to the thermal response of the made-up surface whereas the MEMS sensor appears more sensitive to the heat transfers in the interface between the skin and make-up.
    Skin Research and Technology 08/2006; 12(3):206-10. · 1.41 Impact Factor
  • Rodolphe Korichi, Germaine Gazano, Christian Mahé
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    ABSTRACT: Ethology is defined as the biological study of animal behavior by direct observation and quantification of their behavior in a natural setting, or as close to it as possible. Konrad Lorenz, along with Karl von Frisch and Nikolas Tinbergen are generally recognized as the "fathers of ethology" (1) even if the origins of ethology can be traced back to Charles Darwin and his work on the expressive movements of man and animals. No discussion on ethology would be complete without mentioning Eibl-Eibesfeldt who was the first to successfully apply ethological methods to the study of human behavior by direct observation, using a side-viewing camera, of their attitudes and reactions when confronted with their environment. Human behavioral descriptions are often divided into three major categories. Pre-observation stage : characterize the situation (context) and behaviors to be taken into account for the rest of the study. Observation stage: collection of the behavioral data with construction of an ethogram which is a list, with descriptions, of every behavior that a human is capable of performing under study, and statistical analysis of the data. The aim of this work was to study and quantify the consumers behaviors and emotions during the application of mascaras.
    23rd IFSCC Congress; 01/2004
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    ABSTRACT: To quantify the different properties and visual effect of lipstick formulations using image analysis system and to make a comparison with sensory evaluation.
    AGPI "Skin and Formulation"; 10/2003
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    ABSTRACT: To quantify and confirm the efficacy of radiance skin care formulation using a high quality digital imaging system and computer science programs.
    AGPI "Skin and Formulation"; 10/2003
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    ABSTRACT: Makeup acts and stimulates three of our senses: touch (which encompasses all sensations from the body surface), smell (fragrance), and sight (the process of becoming and looking beautiful). The positive stimulation of these senses by makeup can induce sensory as well as psychological pleasure. In order to understand the relationship of women to their makeup, we interviewed different groups of women on their quality of life and makeup habits. Then, through four standard well-validated psychometric self-questionnaires, we examined the possible relation between the need to make up oneself and specific psychological features. Our first results clearly showed that makeup could support two opposite "up" functions, i.e., "camouflage" vs "seduction." Concerning their psychological profiles, results showed that women of the functional class "camouflage" are more anxious, defensive, and emotionally unstable compared to those of the functional class "seduction," who appear to be more sociable, assertive, and extroverted. Further analyses revealed a division of the two classes into subclasses of volunteers with opposed personality and psychological profiles. This new classification allowed us to define more precisely the relations existing within the subjective experience of women during the makeup process. In conclusion, our study revealed that beyond the simple application of colorful products on the face, makeup has two major functional implications depending on specific psychological profiles of women.
    Journal of cosmetic science 59(2):127-37. · 0.28 Impact Factor