Felix Riano

University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States

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Publications (9)12.06 Total impact

  • American journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.) 07/2004; 33(6):275-7.
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    ABSTRACT: Our results with the ulnohumeral arthroplasty are presented. Seventeen patients were evaluated at an average followup greater than 36 months (range, 24-50 months). The average age of the patients was 52 years (range, 40-74 years). At final followup, 15 patients had complete pain relief at end ranges of motion whereas two patients had moderate pain after prolonged activity. Extension and flexion were improved by a mean of 12 degrees and 20 degrees, respectively, with a mean range of motion 14 degrees to 118 degrees. Postoperative radiographs showed a correctly placed drill hole with complete osteophyte resection. There were no neurologic or other complications and good stability of the elbow was observed in all patients. We think ulnohumeral arthroplasty is a good procedure for active patients with primary degenerative joint disease of the elbow.
    Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research 04/2004; 420(420):190-3. DOI:10.1097/00003086-200403000-00026 · 2.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Despite modern microsurgical techniques for nerve repair, functional outcome following proximal injury is often unsatisfactory because irreversible muscle atrophy may develop before reinnervation occurs. Because insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) has been shown to improve muscle regeneration after injury, and may have a role in muscle preservation following denervation, the purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the histological, immunohistochemical, and electrophysiological differences between normal, denervated, and IGF-1-injected denervated muscle over an 8-week period. Denervated mice gastrocnemius muscles demonstrated a decrease in muscle weight, a decrease in myofiber diameter, an absence of muscle regeneration, an early increase in the number of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), and a decrease in fast-twitch and maximum tetanic strength as compared to normal muscle up to 8 weeks following denervation. IGF-1-injected denervated muscle, on the other hand, sustained muscle diameter and muscle weight, maintained a smaller number of NMJs, and relatively sustained fast-twitch and maximum tetanic strength as compared to normal muscle over 8 weeks. These data suggest that IGF-1 may help prevent muscle atrophy and secondary functional compromise after denervation.
    Microsurgery 01/2002; 22(4):144-51. DOI:10.1002/micr.21742 · 2.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Proximal row carpectomy has been proven to be effective as a salvage procedure for degenerative or post-traumatic disorders of the carpus. The condition of the articular cartilage of the head of the capitate and lunate facets of the radius must be evaluated. However, the results of proximal row carpectomy in cases of Kienbock's disease are controversial. Based on our series and a review of the literature, we believe that proximal row carpectomy is not as effective for Kienbock's disease as for scapholunate advanced collapse.
    Current Opinion in Orthopaedics 07/2001; 12(4):276-279. DOI:10.1097/00001433-200108000-00002
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    ABSTRACT: Despite modern microsurgical techniques, functional outcomes following brachial-plexus reconstruction and peripheral-nerve repair are usually unsatisfactory, because irreversible muscle atrophy develops before reinnervation occurs. Insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) has been shown to improve muscle regeneration after injury, and may have a role in muscle preservation following denervation. This study evaluated the histologic, immunohistochemical, and electrophysiologic differences between normal and denervated muscle over an 8-week time period, and also evaluated the effects of injecting IGF-1 into denervated muscle. Denervated mice gastrocnemius muscles demonstrated a decrease in muscle diameter, a decrease in muscle weight, early nuclear proliferation, and a decrease in fast twitch and maximum tetanic strength, compared to normal gastrocnemius muscle up to 8 weeks following denervation. Four weeks after denervated muscle was injected with IGF-1 at time zero, however, relative preservation of muscle diameter and weight, and maintenance of electrophysiologic contractile properties were observed. These preliminary data suggest that IGF-1 may prevent muscle atrophy secondary to denervation.
    Journal of Reconstructive Microsurgery 01/2001; 17(1):51-7. DOI:10.1055/s-2001-12689 · 1.01 Impact Factor
  • K Fukushima · N Badlani · A Usas · F Riano · FH Fu · J Huard
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    ABSTRACT: Muscle injuries are challenging problems in traumatology and the most frequent injuries in sports medicine. Muscle injuries are capable of healing, although slowly and occasionally with incomplete functional recovery. We observed that lacerated muscle undergoes a rapid process of regeneration, which is hindered by the development of fibrosis. Biologic approaches to enhance muscle regeneration and prevent fibrosis are being investigated to improve muscle healing after injuries. We observed that growth factors can improve muscle regeneration but cannot prevent muscle fibrosis. We investigated the use of an antifibrosis substance, decorin, as an approach to prevent fibrosis and thereby improve muscle healing after injury in murine muscle. We observed that direct injection of human recombinant decorin can efficiently prevent fibrosis and enhance muscle regeneration in the lacerated muscle. More importantly, decorin can improve the recovery of strength in the injured muscle to a level similar to that observed in normal noninjured muscle. These results suggest that injection of decorin improves both the muscle structure and the function of the lacerated muscle to near complete recovery. This study will contribute significantly to the development of strategies to promote efficient muscle healing and complete functional recovery after muscle injuries.
    The American Journal of Sports Medicine 01/2001; 29(4):394-402. DOI:10.1177/03635465010290040201 · 4.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recurrence of symptoms occurs in a significant number of patients after surgical decompression for carpal tunnel syndrome, and its management is both challenging and difficult. Fifteen patients with recurrent carpal tunnel syndrome were treated with a vein wrapping technique using the autologous saphenous vein. A total of 48 operations had been performed on these patients before wrapping the median nerve with a saphenous vein graft. At a mean follow-up of 43 months all patients reported significant pain relief and improvement in their sensory disturbances. Two-point discrimination and the findings of nerve conduction studies also improved.
    The Journal of Hand Surgery British & European Volume 07/2000; 25(3):271-5. DOI:10.1054/jhsb.2000.0379 · 0.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Surgical decompression or transposition is generally efficacious for cubital tunnel syndrome. However, recurrence is not rare and its management is both challenging and difficult. Four patients with refractory cubital tunnel syndrome were operated on with the vein-wrapping technique, using the autologous saphenous vein. A total of 16 operative procedures were performed on these patients prior to wrapping the ulnar nerve with a saphenous vein graft. The mean patient age was 43 years (range: 30 to 54 years) and the mean follow-up was 34 months (range: 24 to 44 months). All patients reported significant pain relief and improvement in sensation. Two-point discrimination and EMG findings also improved. This is the first study reporting long-term results of the vein-wrapping technique for the treatment of recalcitrant cubital tunnel syndrome.
    Journal of Reconstructive Microsurgery 06/2000; 16(4):273-7. DOI:10.1055/s-2000-7333 · 1.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cubital tunnel syndrome is a relatively common entity among compression neuropathies of the upper extremities. Different techniques to treat failure of conservative treatment have been described in the literature. These procedures are based on decompressing of the nerve alone or in combination with placement in a new physiologic bed. In this paper, we review the surgical options for treatment of the cubital tunnel syndrome.
    Techniques in Orthopaedics 06/2000; 15(2):113-119. DOI:10.1097/00013611-200015020-00004