Emi Ogasawara

University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan

Are you Emi Ogasawara?

Claim your profile

Publications (4)23.49 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We generated transmitochondrial mice (mito-mice) that carry a mutation in the tRNA(Lys) gene encoded by mtDNA for use in studies of its pathogenesis and transmission profiles. Because patients with mitochondrial diseases frequently carry mutations in the mitochondrial tRNA(Lys) and tRNA(Leu(UUR)) genes, we focused our efforts on identifying somatic mutations of these genes in mouse lung carcinoma P29 cells. Of the 43 clones of PCR products including the tRNA(Lys) or tRNA(Leu(UUR)) genes in mtDNA of P29 cells, one had a potentially pathogenic mutation (G7731A) in the tRNA(Lys) gene. P29 subclones with predominant amounts of G7731A mtDNA expressed respiration defects, thus suggesting the pathogenicity of this mutation. We then transferred G7731A mtDNA into mouse ES cells and obtained F0 chimeric mice. Mating these F0 mice with C57BL/6J (B6) male mice resulted in the generation of F1 mice with G7731A mtDNA, named "mito-mice-tRNA(Lys7731)." Maternal inheritance and random segregation of G7731A mtDNA occurred in subsequent generations. Mito-mice-tRNA(Lys7731) with high proportions of G7731A mtDNA exclusively expressed respiration defects and disease-related phenotypes and therefore are potential models for mitochondrial diseases due to mutations in the mitochondrial tRNA(Lys) gene. Moreover, the proportion of mutated mtDNA varied markedly among the pups born to each dam, suggesting that selecting oocytes with high proportions of normal mtDNA from affected mothers with tRNA(Lys)-based mitochondrial diseases may be effective as a primary prevention for obtaining unaffected children.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 02/2014; · 9.81 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Patient studies have suggested that the clinical phenotypes of some mitochondrial diseases might transit from one disease to another (e.g., Pearson syndrome [PS] to Kearns-Sayre syndrome [KSS]) in single individuals carrying mitochondrial (mt) DNA with a common deletion (mtDNA), but there is no direct experimental evidence for this. To determine if mtDNA has the pathological potential to induce multiple mitochondrial disease phenotypes, we used trans-mitochondrial mice with a heteroplasmic state of wild-type mtDNA and mtDNA (mito-mice). Late-stage embryos carrying ≥50% mtDNA showed abnormal hematopoiesis and iron metabolism in livers that were partly similar to PS (PS-like phenotypes), although they did not express sideroblastic anemia that is a typical symptom of PS. More than half of the neonates with PS-like phenotypes died by 1 month after birth, while the rest showed a decrease of mtDNA load in the affected tissues, peripheral blood and liver, and they recovered from PS-like phenotypes. The proportion of mtDNA in various tissues of the surviving mito-mice increased with time, and KSS-like phenotypes were expressed when the proportion of mtDNA in various tissues reached >70%-80%. Our model mouse study clearly showed that a single mtDNA was responsible for at least two distinct disease phenotypes at different ages and suggested that the level and dynamics of mtDNA load in affected tissues would be important for the onset and transition of mitochondrial disease phenotypes in mice.
    G3-Genes Genomes Genetics 07/2013; · 1.79 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Lactic acidemia is one manifestation of the mitochondrial diseases caused by pathogenic mutant mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). However, little is known about its chronic effects in the progression of mitochondrial disease phenotypes. To obtain experimental evidence on this point, we used trans-mitochondrial model mice (mito-mice) heteroplasmic for wild-type and deleted mtDNA (DeltamtDNA). Mito-mice carrying predominantly DeltamtDNA showed mitochondrial respiration defects and the resultant disease phenotypes, including lactic acidemia; they also showed a decrease in mitochondrial biogenesis regulated by the peroxisome proliferative activated receptor gamma, coactivator 1 alpha (PGC1alpha)-mediated pathway, such as the expression of mitochondrial transcription factor A and mtDNA-encoded gene products and the control of mtDNA content. When the accelerated lactate production of these mito-mice was pharmacologically inhibited by sodium dichloroacetate (DCA), the decrease in mitochondrial biogenesis improved, thus leading to the relaxation of mitochondrial respiration defects and extension of life span. These results showed that chronic overproduction of lactate caused by metabolic adaptation in mitochondrial diseases further deconditioned mitochondrial function. Mitochondrial respiration defects in mitochondrial diseases are therefore induced not only directly by the presence of mutant mtDNA, but also by the chronic lactic acidemia. Our in vivo study also suggested that inhibition of chronic lactic acidemia is a potential strategy for treating some mitochondrial diseases.
    Human Molecular Genetics 08/2010; 19(16):3179-89. · 7.69 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) with pathogenic mutations has been found in patients with cognitive disorders. However, little is known about whether pathogenic mtDNA mutations and the resultant mitochondrial respiration deficiencies contribute to the expression of cognitive alterations, such as impairments of learning and memory. To address this point, we used two groups of trans-mitochondrial mice (mito-mice) with heteroplasmy for wild-type and pathogenically deleted (Δ) mtDNA; the "low" group carried 50% or less ΔmtDNA, and the "high" group carried more than 50% ΔmtDNA. Both groups had normal phenotypes for not only spatial learning, but also memory at short retention delays, indicating that ΔmtDNA load did not affect learning and temporal memory. The high group, however, showed severe impairment of memory at long retention delays. In the visual cortex and dentate gyrus of these mice, we observed mitochondrial respiration deficiencies, and reduced Ca²(+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II-α (α-CaMKII), a protein important for the establishment of spatial remote memory. Our results indicated that normal mitochondrial respiratory function is necessary for retention and consolidation of memory trace; deficiencies in this function due to high loads of pathogenically mutated mtDNA are responsible for the preferential impairment of spatial remote memory.
    Molecular Brain 01/2009; 1:21. · 4.20 Impact Factor