E Shirzadi

Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Ostān-e Eşfahān, Iran

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Publications (4)0.85 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Proper management of depression in elderly population would improve the outcome of the disease and reduce its related disability and mortality. Use of memantine with minimal side effects and drug interaction seems reasonable in the elderly but its antidepressant activity is controversial. The aim of the current research is to investigate the effects of add-on memantine during citalopram therapy in elderly patients with depression, in Isfahan.
    Journal of research in medical sciences : the official journal of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. 06/2014; 19(6):525-30.
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    ABSTRACT: Impaired fasting glucose identifies individuals at high risk of progression to diabetes but the role of IFG as a coronary artery disease risk factor, independent of its progression to diabetes and its association with other coronary artery disease risk factors ,is unclear. A cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the hypothesis that impaired fasting glucose increased the likelihood of atherosclerotic plaque formation. Blood chemistry data as well as traditional coronary artery disease risk factors from 812 patients referred for coronary angiography to heart centers in Shahid-Chamran and Sina hospital, Isfahan, Iran were recorded. The population were stratified into three groups according to American Diabetes Association criteria: normal fasting glucose (n=608), impaired fasting glucose(n=92) and diabetes mellitus(n=112).We use extent, Vessel and stenosis scores to indicate the coronary artery involvement. KrusKal-Wallis test showed that the means of extent, Vessel and stenosis scores are not significantly different between three groups(P> 0.05). Multivariate linear regression analysis, using extent score of coronary artery disease as dependent variable and traditional risk factors and impaired fasting glucose as independent variables did not show any significant difference either. Our data suggested that impaired fasting glucose is not associated with increased risk of coronary atherosclerosis.
    Acta medica Iranica 07/2012; 46:38-42.
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    ABSTRACT: It is uncertain whether high serum uric acid levels are a true independent risk factor for coronary atherosclerosis or whether the association is due to other confounding variables. We therefore studied the relationship between elevated serum uric acid levels and coronary atherosclerosis after adjustment was made for confounding factors such as age, gender, body mass index, smoking, lipid profile, blood pressure and blood glucose levels. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 240 patients referred for coronary angiography to heart centres in the Shahid-Chamran and Sina hospitals, Isfahan, Iran. Blood chemistry data as well as traditional risk factors and uric acid levels were measured at enrollment. We used vessel, stenosis and extent scores to indicate the degree of coronary artery involvement. This study was conducted on 240 patients with a mean age of 56 +/- 10.9 years (66% male; 37% female) who underwent coronary angiography. Student's t-test analyses revealed that there were significant differences in the mean uric acid levels between male and female patients (p = 0.001). We found no statistically significant correlation between serum uric acid levels and coronary atherosclerosis (p > 0.05). In addition, multivariate logistic regression analyses, using coronary atherosclerosis as dependent variable and traditional risk factors and uric acid levels as independent variables, did not show any significant difference. These findings indicated that uric acid is not associated with coronary atherosclerosis. Any correlation reported in other studies was probably due to the relationship between high serum uric acid levels and other cardiovascular risk factors.
    Cardiovascular journal of South Africa: official journal for Southern Africa Cardiac Society [and] South African Society of Cardiac Practitioners 01/2007; 18(1):16-9.
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    ABSTRACT: Thalassaemia is considered the most common genetic disorder worldwide. An association between the heterozygous beta-thalassaemia trait and myocardial infarction has previously been observed. However, the relationship between heterozygous beta-thalassaemia and atherosclerosis, considering other coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors, has remained unclear. A case-control study was conducted to evaluate the hypothesis that thalassaemia minor affects the likelihood of atherosclerotic plaque formation. Blood counts and blood chemistry data as well as traditional risk factors from 1,363 patients referred to heart centres for coronary angiography were recorded. Heterozygous beta-thalassaemia was diagnosed by the presence of hypochoromic-microcytic anaemia, ferritin levels > 12 ng/ml and haemoglobin-A2 levels > 3.5. Chi-squared analysis showed that the prevalence of heterozygous beta-thalassaemia was not significantly different between patients with and without CAD (p > 0.05). Multivariate logistic regression analysis using CAD as the dependent variable and traditional risk factors, haematocrit, ferritin levels and heterozygous beta-thalassaemia as independent variables, did not show any significant difference either. Independent two-tailed student's t-tests showed that haematocrit levels were statistically different (p = 0.000) between CAD(+) and CAD(-) groups, but low-density lipids (LDL), high-density lipids (HDL), triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol and serum ferritin levels were not statistically different (p > 0.05). The prevalence of heterozygous beta-thalassaemia in the case group was not significantly different from the control group. This case-control study did not support the hypothesis that thalassaemia minor affects the likelihood of atherosclerotic plaque formation.
    Cardiovascular journal of Africa 01/2007; 18(3):165-8. · 0.85 Impact Factor