E F Schoenmakers

Radboud University Medical Centre (Radboudumc), Nymegen, Gelderland, Netherlands

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Publications (127)536.5 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Uterine leiomyomas are benign solid tumors of mesenchymal origin which occur with an estimated incidence of up to 77% of all women of reproductive age. The majority of these tumors remains symptomless, but in about a quarter of cases they cause leiomyoma‐associated symptoms including chronic pelvic pain, menorrhagia‐induced anemia, and impaired fertility. As a consequence, they are the most common indication for pre‐menopausal hysterectomy in the USA and Japan and annually translate into a multibillion dollar healthcare problem. Approximately 40% of these neoplasms present with recurring structural cytogenetic anomalies, including del(7)(q22), t(12;14)(q15;q24), t(1;2)(p36;p24), and anomalies affecting 6p21 and/or 10q22. Using positional cloning strategies, we and others previously identified HMGA1, HMGA2, RAD51L1, MORF, and, more recently, NCOA1 as primary target (fusion) genes associated with tumor initiation in four of these distinct cytogenetic subgroups. Despite the fact that the del(7)(q22) subgroup is the largest among leiomyomas, and was first described more than twenty years ago, the 7q22 leiomyoma target gene still awaits unequivocal identification. We here describe a positional cloning effort from two independent uterine leiomyomas, containing respectively a pericentric and a paracentric chromosomal inversion, both affecting band 7q22. We found that both chromosomal inversions target the cut‐like homeobox 1 (CUX1) gene on chromosomal band 7q22.1 in a way which is functionally equivalent to the more frequently observed del(7q) cases, and which is compatible with a mono‐allelic knock‐out scenario, similar as was previously described for the cytogenetic subgroup showing chromosome 14q involvement. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Genes Chromosomes and Cancer 01/2013; 52(1). · 3.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Uterine leiomyomas are benign solid tumors of mesenchymal origin which occur with an estimated incidence of up to 77% of all women of reproductive age. The majority of these tumors remains symptomless, but in about a quarter of cases they cause leiomyoma-associated symptoms including chronic pelvic pain, menorrhagia-induced anemia, and impaired fertility. As a consequence, they are the most common indication for pre-menopausal hysterectomy in the USA and Japan and annually translate into a multibillion dollar healthcare problem. Approximately 40% of these neoplasms present with recurring structural cytogenetic anomalies, including del(7)(q22), t(12;14)(q15;q24), t(1;2)(p36;p24), and anomalies affecting 6p21 and/or 10q22. Using positional cloning strategies, we and others previously identified HMGA1, HMGA2, RAD51L1, MORF, and, more recently, NCOA1 as primary target (fusion) genes associated with tumor initiation in four of these distinct cytogenetic subgroups. Despite the fact that the del(7)(q22) subgroup is the largest among leiomyomas, and was first described more than twenty years ago, the 7q22 leiomyoma target gene still awaits unequivocal identification. We here describe a positional cloning effort from two independent uterine leiomyomas, containing respectively a pericentric and a paracentric chromosomal inversion, both affecting band 7q22. We found that both chromosomal inversions target the cut-like homeobox 1 (CUX1) gene on chromosomal band 7q22.1 in a way which is functionally equivalent to the more frequently observed del(7q) cases, and which is compatible with a mono-allelic knock-out scenario, similar as was previously described for the cytogenetic subgroup showing chromosome 14q involvement. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Genes Chromosomes and Cancer 09/2012; · 3.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Microcephaly, mental retardation and congenital retinal folds along with other systemic features have previously been reported as a separate clinical entity. The sporadic nature of the syndrome and lack of clear inheritance patterns pointed to a genetic heterogeneity. Here, we report a genetic analysis of a female patient with microcephaly, congenital bilateral falciform retinal folds, nystagmus, and mental retardation. Karyotyping revealed a de novo pericentric inversion in chromosome 6 with breakpoints in 6p12.1 and 6q21. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis narrowed down the region around the breakpoints, and the breakpoint at 6q21 was found to disrupt the CDK19 gene. CDK19 was found to be expressed in a diverse range of tissues including fetal eye and fetal brain. Quantitative PCR of the CDK19 transcript from Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines of the patient revealed ~50% reduction in the transcript (p = 0.02), suggesting haploinsufficiency of the gene. cdk8, the closest orthologue of human CDK19 in Drosophila has been shown to play a major role in eye development. Conditional knock-down of Drosophila cdk8 in multiple dendrite (md) neurons resulted in 35% reduced dendritic branching and altered morphology of the dendritic arbour, which appeared to be due in part to a loss of small higher order branches. In addition, Cdk8 mutant md neurons showed diminished dendritic fields revealing an important role of the CDK19 orthologue in the developing nervous system of Drosophila. This is the first time the CDK19 gene, a component of the mediator co-activator complex, has been linked to a human disease.
    Human Genetics 09/2010; 128(3):281-91. · 4.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Next-generation sequencing is a straightforward tool for the identification of disease genes in extended genomic regions. Autozygosity mapping was performed on a five-generation inbred Italian family with three siblings affected with Clericuzio-type poikiloderma with neutropenia (PN [MIM %604173]), a rare autosomal-recessive genodermatosis characterised by poikiloderma, pachyonychia, and chronic neutropenia. The siblings were initially diagnosed as affected with Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS [MIM #268400]), with which PN shows phenotypic overlap. Linkage analysis on all living subjects of the family identified a large 16q region inherited identically by descent (IBD) in all affected family members. Deep sequencing of this 3.4 Mb region previously enriched with array capture revealed a homozygous c.504-2 A>C mismatch in all affected siblings. The mutation destroys the invariant AG acceptor site of intron 4 of the evolutionarily conserved C16orf57 gene. Two distinct deleterious mutations (c.502A>G and c.666_676+1del12) identified in an unrelated PN patient confirmed that the C16orf57 gene is responsible for PN. The function of the predicted C16orf57 gene is unknown, but its product has been shown to be interconnected to RECQL4 protein via SMAD4 proteins. The unravelled clinical and genetic identity of PN allows patients to undergo genetic testing and follow-up.
    The American Journal of Human Genetics 12/2009; 86(1):72-6. · 11.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: FBXW7 (alias CDC4) is a p53-dependent tumor suppressor gene that exhibits mutations or deletions in a variety of human tumors. Mutation or deletion of the FBXW7 gene has been associated with an increase in chromosomal instability and cell cycle progression. In addition, the FBXW7 protein has been found to act as a component of the ubiquitin proteasome system and to degrade several oncogenic proteins that function in cellular growth regulatory pathways. By using a rapid breakpoint cloning procedure in a case of renal cell cancer (RCC), we found that the FBXW7 gene was disrupted by a constitutional t(3;4)(q21;q31). Subsequent analysis of the tumor tissue revealed the presence of several anomalies, including loss of the derivative chromosome 3. Upon screening of a cohort of 29 independent primary RCCs, we identified one novel pathogenic mutation, suggesting that the FBXW7 gene may also play a role in the development of sporadic RCCs. In addition, we screened a cohort of 48 unrelated familial RCC cases with unknown etiology. Except for several known or benign sequence variants such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), no additional pathogenic variants were found. Previous mouse models have suggested that the FBXW7 gene may play a role in the predisposition to tumor development. Here we report that disruption of this gene may predispose to the development of human RCC.
    Cancer genetics and cytogenetics 12/2009; 195(2):105-11. · 1.54 Impact Factor
  • Leukemia: official journal of the Leukemia Society of America, Leukemia Research Fund, U.K 10/2009; 24(1):242-6. · 10.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Uterine leiomyomas are the most common neoplasms in women of reproductive age. Approximately 40% of these neoplasms show recurring structural cytogenetic anomalies, including del(7)(q22), t(12;14)(q15;q24), t(1;2)(p36;p24), and anomalies affecting 6p21 or 10q22. Using positional cloning strategies, we and others had previously identified HMGA1, HMGA2, RAD51L1, and MYST4 (previously referred to as MORF); as primary target (fusion) genes associated with tumor development in three of these distinct cytogenetic subgroups. Here, we report the positional cloning of a single, recurrent, leiomyoma-associated anomaly, t(1;2)(p36;p24). Molecular characterization of the reciprocal breakpoint intervals showed that that AJAP1 (alias SHREW1) and NPHP4 flank the breakpoint on chromosome 1 and that ITSN2 and NCOA1 flank the breakpoint on chromosome 2. Detailed analysis of the breakpoint regions revealed that in this particular case the translocation was associated with a 27-bp deletion on chromosome 1 and a 136-bp duplication on chromosome 2. No breakpoint-spanning (fusion) genes were identified. In silico prediction of transcription factor binding sites, however, indicated the presence of several such sites in the respective breakpoint regions, and major changes therein as a result of the t(1;2)(p36;p24) under investigation. We postulate that transcriptional deregulation of one or more of these breakpoint-flanking genes may contribute to the development of human uterine leiomyomas.
    Cancer genetics and cytogenetics 09/2009; 193(1):54-62. · 1.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Over the last three decades, technological developments facilitating assisted reproductive techniques (ART) have revolutionized the treatment of subfertile couples, including men suffering from severe oligospermia or azoospermia. In parallel with the advent of these technologies, there is a great concern about the biological safety of ART. This concern is supported by the clinical observation that the frequency of congenital malformations is slightly elevated among ART-conceived children. In this explorative study, we have used tiling-resolution BAC array-mediated comparative genomic hybridization to investigate the incidence of de novo genomic copy number changes in a group of 12 ICSI children, compared with a control group of 30 naturally conceived children. In 6 of the 12 ICSI children, we found 10 apparently de novo 'same direction genomic copy number changes' [i.e. simultaneous copy number gain (or loss) with respect to both biological parents], notably losses. In statistically significant contrast, similar observations were encountered only six times in the control group in 5 of the 30 children. However, our study group was small, so a larger group is needed to confirm these findings. Loci at which we found de novo alterations are known from the human genome database to be prone to large DNA segment copy number changes. As discussed, various molecular mechanisms, including the consequences of delayed male meiotic synapsis and replication fork stalling at early embryonic cell cycles, might trigger these copy number changes.
    Human Reproduction 11/2008; 24(1):233-40. · 4.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a rare, multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome characterized by varied clinical signs including facial dysmorphism, pre- and post-natal growth defects, small hands and malformations of the upper limbs. Established genetic causes include mutations in the NIPBL (50-60%), SMC1L1 and SMC3 (5%) genes. To detect chromosomal rearrangements pointing to novel positional candidate CdLS genes, we used array-CGH to analyze a subgroup of 24 CdLS patients negative for mutations in the NIPBL and SMC1L1 genes. We identified three carriers of DNA copy number alterations, including a de novo 15q26.2-qter 8-Mb deletion, and two inherited 13q14.2-q14.3 1-Mb deletion and 13q21.32-q21.33 1.5-Mb duplication, not reported among copy number variants. The clinical presentation of all three patients matched the diagnostic criteria for CdLS, and the phenotype of the patient with the 15qter deletion is compared to that of both CdLS and 15qter microdeletion patients.
    Clinical Genetics 10/2008; 74(6):531-8. · 4.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is characterized by the t(11;14)(q13;q32) translocation and several other cytogenetic aberrations, including heterozygous loss of chromosomal arms 1p, 6q, 11q and 13q and/or gains of 3q and 8q. The common intervals of chromosomal imbalance have been narrowed down using array-comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). However, the chromosomal intervals still contain many genes potentially involved in MCL pathogeny. Combined analysis of tiling-resolution array-CGH with gene expression profiling on 11 MCL tumours enabled the identification of genomic alterations and their corresponding gene expression profiles. Only subsets of genes located within given cytogenetic anomaly-intervals showed a concomitant change in mRNA expression level. The genes that showed consistent correlation between DNA copy number and RNA expression levels are likely to be important in MCL pathology. Besides several 'anonymous genes', we also identified various fully annotated genes, whose gene products are involved in cyclic adenosine monophosphate-regulated pathways (PRKACB), DNA damage repair, maintenance of chromosome stability and prevention of rereplication (ATM, ERCC5, FBXO5), energy metabolism (such as genes that are involved in the synthesis of proteins encoded by the mitochondrial genome) and signal transduction (ARHGAP29). Deregulation of these gene products may interfere with the signalling pathways that are involved in MCL tumour development and maintenance.
    British Journal of Haematology 09/2008; 143(2):210-21. · 4.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We analysed DNA samples isolated from individuals born with cleft lip and cleft palate to identify deletions and duplications of candidate gene loci using array comparative genomic hybridisation (array-CGH). Of 83 syndromic cases analysed we identified one subject with a previously unknown 2.7 Mb deletion at 22q11.21 coinciding with the DiGeorge syndrome region. Eighteen of the syndromic cases had clinical features of Van der Woude syndrome and deletions were identified in five of these, all of which encompassed the interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) gene. In a series of 104 non-syndromic cases we found one subject with a 3.2 Mb deletion at chromosome 6q25.1-25.2 and another with a 2.2 Mb deletion at 10q26.11-26.13. Analyses of parental DNA demonstrated that the two deletion cases at 22q11.21 and 6q25.1-25.2 were de novo, while the deletion of 10q26.11-26.13 was inherited from the mother, who also has a cleft lip. These deletions appear likely to be causally associated with the phenotypes of the subjects. Estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) and fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) genes from the 6q25.1-25.2 and 10q26.11-26.13, respectively, were identified as likely causative genes using a gene prioritization software. We have shown that array-CGH analysis of DNA samples derived from cleft lip and palate subjects is an efficient and productive method for identifying candidate chromosomal loci and genes, complementing traditional genetic mapping strategies.
    Journal of Medical Genetics 03/2008; 45(2):81-6. · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Basal and luminal are two molecular subtypes of breast cancer with opposite histoclinical features. We report a combined, high-resolution analysis of genome copy number and gene expression in primary basal and luminal breast cancers. First, we identified and compared genomic alterations in 45 basal and 48 luminal tumors by using 244K oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). We found various genome gains and losses and rare high-level gene amplifications that may provide therapeutic targets. We show that gain of 10p is a new alteration in basal breast cancer and that a subregion of the 8p12 amplification is specific of luminal tumors. Rare high-level amplifications contained BCL2L2, CCNE, EGFR, FGFR2, IGF1R, NOTCH2, and PIK3CA. Potential gene breaks involved ETV6 and FLT3. Second, we analyzed both aCGH and gene expression profiles for 42 basal and 32 luminal breast cancers. The results support the existence of specific oncogenic pathways in basal and luminal breast cancers, involving several potential oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSG). In basal tumors, 73 candidate oncogenes were identified in chromosome regions 1q21-23, 10p14, and 12p13 and 28 candidate TSG in regions 4q32-34 and 5q11-23. In luminal breast cancers, 33 potential oncogenes were identified in 1q21-23, 8p12-q21, 11q13, and 16p12-13 and 61 candidate TSG in 16q12-13, 16q22-24, and 17p13. HORMAD1 (P = 6.5 x 10(-5)) and ZNF703 (P = 7 x 10(-4)) were the most significant basal and luminal potential oncogenes, respectively. Finally, among 10p candidate oncogenes associated with basal subtype, we validated CDC123/C10orf7 protein as a basal marker.
    Cancer Research 01/2008; 67(24):11565-75. · 9.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Our group and others had previously developed a high throughput procedure to map translocation breakpoints using chromosome flow sorting in conjunction with microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (arrayCGH). Here we applied both conventional positional cloning and integrated arrayCGH procedures to the mapping of constitutional chromosome anomalies in four patients with renal cell cancer (RCC), three with a chromosome 3 translocation, and one with an insertion involving chromosome 3. In one of these patients, who was carrying a t(3;4)(p13;p15), the KCNIP4 gene was found to be disrupted. KCNIP4 belongs to a family of potassium channel-interacting proteins and is highly expressed in normal kidney cells. In addition, KCNIP4 splice variants have specifically been encountered in RCC.
    Cancer Genetics and Cytogenetics 12/2007; 179(1):11-8. · 1.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Gross cytogenetic anomalies are traditionally being used as diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic markers in the clinical management of cancer, including childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Recently, it has become increasingly clear that genetic lesions driving tumorigenesis frequently occur at the submicroscopic level and, consequently, escape standard cytogenetic observations. Therefore, we profiled the genomes of 40 childhood ALLs at high resolution. We detected multiple de novo genetic lesions, including gross aneuploidies and segmental gains and losses, some of which were subtle and affected single genes. Many of these lesions involved recurrent (partially) overlapping deletions and duplications, containing various established leukemia-associated genes, such as ETV6, RUNX1 and MLL. Importantly, the most frequently affected genes were those controlling G1/S cell cycle progression (e.g. CDKN2A, CDKN1B and RB1), followed by genes associated with B-cell development. The latter group includes microdeletions of the B-lineage transcription factors PAX5, EBF, E2-2 and IKZF1 (Ikaros), as well as genes with other established roles in B-cell development, that is RAG1 and RAG2, FYN, PBEF1 or CBP/PAG. The fact that we frequently encountered multiple lesions affecting genes involved in cell cycle regulation and B-cell differentiation strongly suggests that both these processes need to be targeted independently and simultaneously to trigger ALL development.
    Leukemia 07/2007; 21(6):1258-66. · 10.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) represent a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, which differ in histological, pathologic and clinical characteristics. The tumors originate from different locations within the nephron and are accompanied by different recurrent (cyto)genetic anomalies. Recently, a novel subgroup of RCCs has been defined, i.e., the MiT translocation subgroup of RCCs. These tumors originate from the proximal tubule of the nephron, exhibit pleomorphic histological features including clear cell morphologies and papillary structures, and are found predominantly in children and young adults. In addition, these tumors are characterized by the occurrence of recurrent chromosomal translocations, which result in disruption and fusion of either the TFE3 or TFEB genes, both members of the MiT family of basic helix-loop-helix/leucine-zipper transcription factor genes. Hence the name MiT translocation subgroup of RCCs. In this review several features of this RCC subgroup will be discussed, including the molecular mechanisms that may underlie their development.
    Cytogenetic and Genome Research 02/2007; 118(2-4):157-65. · 1.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To delineate clinically relevant molecular signatures of intracranial ependymoma. We analyzed 24 primary intracranial ependymomas. For genomic profiling, microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was used and results were validated by fluorescent in situ hybridization and loss of heterozygosity mapping. We performed gene expression profiling using microarrays, real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and methylation analysis of selected genes. We applied class comparison analyses to compare both genomic and expression profiling data with clinical characteristics. A variable number of genomic imbalances were detected by array CGH, revealing multiple regions of recurrent gain (including 2q23, 7p21, 12p, 13q21.1, and 20p12) and loss (including 5q31, 6q26, 7q36, 15q21.1, 16q24, 17p13.3, 19p13.2, and 22q13.3). An ependymoma-specific gene expression signature was characterized by the concurrent abnormal expression of developmental and differentiation pathways, including NOTCH and sonic hedgehog signaling. We identified specific differentially imbalanced genomic clones and gene expression signatures significantly associated with tumor location, patient age at disease onset, and retrospective risk for relapse. Integrated genomic and expression profiling allowed us to identify genes of which the expression is deregulated in intracranial ependymoma, such as overexpression of the putative proto-oncogene YAP1 (located at 11q22) and downregulation of the SULT4A1 gene (at 22q13.3). The present exploratory molecular profiling study allowed us to refine previously reported intervals of genomic imbalance, to identify novel restricted regions of gain and loss, and to identify molecular signatures correlating with various clinical variables. Validation of these results on independent data sets represents the next step before translation into the clinical setting.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 12/2006; 24(33):5223-33. · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A 08/2006; 140A(18):1973 - 1977. · 2.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent molecular cytogenetic analysis of uterine leiomyoma cell lines with chromosome 12 aberrations has indicated that their chromosome 12 breakpoints map between linkage locus D12S8 and the CHOP gene. Here, we report fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and molecular cloning studies of the chromosome 12 breakpoints in a panel of seven such uterine leiomyoma cell lines; five with the frequently observed t(12; 14)(q15;q24), one with t(12;15)(q15;q24), and one with ins(12;11)(q14;q21 qter). Directional chromosome walking studies starting from D12S8 and the CHOP gene resulted in the isolation of a relatively large number of overlapping YAC clones, including Y5355 (465 kbp), Y7673 (360 kbp), and Y9899 (275 kbp). In total, the inserts of these three YAC clones span an 800 kbp long and presumably contiguous stretch of human genomic DNA. All chromosome 12 breakpoints of the uterine leiomyoma cell lines studied were found by FISH analysis to be mapping within a 445 kbp subfragment of this region and, furthermore, to be dispersed over a DNA region which is at least 150 kbp in size. The chromosome 12 breakpoint of t(12;14)(q15;q24) in uterine leiomyoma cell line LM-30.1/SV40 was tentatively mapped within the 60 kbp region between YAC clones Y9899 and Y5355. From this 60 kbp region and close to sequencetagged site RM99, we isolated probe pRM 118-A, which showed in Southern blot analysis that it detected a rearrangement in LM-30.1/SV40 DNA, and generated restriction maps of the normal and rearranged genomic DNA regions detected with this probe. Finally, we molecularly cloned part of one of those rearranged DNA fragments using a vectorette-PCR-based technique and demonstrated that it consisted of 12q13-q15 sequences fused to DNA sequences derived from 14q23-24 and most likely represented the translocation junction on der(14) in LM-30.1/SV40 cells. Our studies strongly suggest that we have identified and isolated the uterine leiomyoma cluster region of chromosome 12 breakpoints, which we designate ULCR12, and molecularly cloned and characterized the der(14) translocation junction in cells derived from a uterine leiomyoma carrying the frequently observed t(12;14)(q15;q24).
    Genes Chromosomes and Cancer 07/2006; 11(2):106 - 118. · 3.55 Impact Factor
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    Leukemia 07/2006; 20(6):1187-9. · 10.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Identification of genetic copy number changes in glial tumors is of importance in the context of improved/refined diagnostic, prognostic procedures and therapeutic decision-making. In order to detect recurrent genomic copy number changes that might play a role in glioma pathogenesis and/or progression, we characterized 25 primary glioma cell lines including 15 non glioblastoma (non GBM) (I-III WHO grade) and 10 GBM (IV WHO grade), by array comparative genomic hybridization, using a DNA microarray comprising approx. 3500 BACs covering the entire genome with a 1 Mb resolution and additional 800 BACs covering chromosome 19 at tiling path resolution. Combined evaluation by single clone and whole chromosome analysis plus 'moving average (MA) approach' enabled us to confirm most of the genetic abnormalities previously identified to be associated with glioma progression, including +1q32, +7, -10, -22q, PTEN and p16 loss, and to disclose new small genomic regions, some correlating with grade malignancy. Grade I-III gliomas exclusively showed losses at 3p26 (53%), 4q13-21 (33%) and 7p15-p21 (26%), whereas only GBMs exhibited 4p16.1 losses (40%). Other recurrent imbalances, such as losses at 4p15, 5q22-q23, 6p23-25, 12p13 and gains at 11p11-q13, were shared by different glioma grades. Three intervals with peak of loss could be further refined for chromosome 10 by our MA approach. Data analysis of full-coverage chromosome 19 highlighted two main regions of copy number gain, never described before in gliomas, at 19p13.11 and 19q13.13-13.2. The well-known 19q13.3 loss of heterozygosity area in gliomas was not frequently affected in our cell lines. Genomic hotspot detection facilitated the identification of small intervals resulting in positional candidate genes such as PRDM2 (1p36.21), LRP1B (2q22.3), ADARB2 (10p15.3), BCCIP (10q26.2) and ING1 (13q34) for losses and ECT2 (3q26.3), MDK, DDB2, IG20 (11p11.2) for gains. These data increase our current knowledge about cryptic genetic changes in gliomas and may facilitate the further identification of novel genetic elements, which may provide us with molecular tools for the improved diagnostics and therapeutic decision-making in these tumors.
    Oncogene 04/2006; 25(10):1571-83. · 8.56 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

4k Citations
536.50 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2001–2013
    • Radboud University Medical Centre (Radboudumc)
      • Department of Human Genetics
      Nymegen, Gelderland, Netherlands
  • 2005–2012
    • Radboud University Nijmegen
      • • Department of Human Genetics
      • • Department of Urology
      Nijmegen, Provincie Gelderland, Netherlands
  • 2006
    • University of Milan
      Milano, Lombardy, Italy
  • 1994–2006
    • University of Leuven
      • • Department of Human Genetics
      • • Department of Reproduction, Development and Regeneration
      Louvain, Flanders, Belgium
  • 2004
    • Center for Human Genetics, Inc.
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
  • 1996–2001
    • Universität Bremen
      • Center for Human Genetics and Genetic Counselling (ZHG)
      Bremen, Bremen, Germany
  • 1998–1999
    • Vlaams Instituut voor Biotechnologie
      Gand, Flanders, Belgium
    • Maastricht University
      • Genetica en Celbiologie
      Maastricht, Provincie Limburg, Netherlands
  • 1996–1998
    • Universitair Ziekenhuis Leuven
      • Centre for human genetics
      Leuven, VLG, Belgium