D S Nunes

State University of Ponta Grossa, Ponta Grossa, Paraná, Brazil

Are you D S Nunes?

Claim your profile

Publications (49)94.12 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This work aimed at using a simplex-centroid design to model the effects of green, yellow, and red teas mixtures (Camellia sinensis var sinensis) on metal chelation activity, phenolic composition, antioxidant activity, and instrumental taste profile. The regression models that described the extraction of flavan-3-ols, o-diphenols, total phenolic compounds (TPC), free-radical scavenging activity towards 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH), cupric-ion reducing antioxidant activity (CUPRAC), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) were significant and data were fit satisfactorily (R2>80%). A mixture of green and red teas had a synergism in CUPRAC and TPC, while a mixture of yellow and red teas had a positive effect on CUPRAC and DPPH. An optimization was performed to maximize the antioxidant activity, flavan-3-ol content and to render a tea with mild bitterness and results showed that a mixture of 14.81% green, 56.86% yellow and 28.33% red teas would be the most suitable combination of factors.
    Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 10/2014; 62(42). DOI:10.1021/jf504480f · 3.11 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The results of analyses by GC-MS-FID of essential oils obtained from cladodes and inflorescences from male and female specimens of Baccharis milleflora are presented here for the first time in the literature. The essential oil of B. milleflora presented high variations in the chemical components, especially in viridiflorol contents that varied from 2.11 to 41.48 %, and an unidentified component labeled 212 (M+.) (0.62 to 11.87 %). Data were analyzed using unsupervised statistical techniques, namely Hierarchical Cluster Analysis and Principal Component Analysis, and it was possible to observe different chemical compositions for the different plant organs. The same trend was observed when maturity of the plant organs was considered. Viridiflorol was isolated and identified by spectroscopic analyses.
    Journal of essential oil-bearing plants JEOP 09/2014; 17(5). DOI:10.1080/0972060X.2014.890078 · 0.19 Impact Factor
  • Débora C. Bassani, Domingos S. Nunes, Daniel Granato
    Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências 01/2014; 86(2):923-934. DOI:10.1590/0001-3765201420130019 · 0.88 Impact Factor
  • Source
  • Source
  • Source
  • Source
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: GC/MS/FID analyses of volatile compounds from cladodes and inflorescences from male and female specimens of Baccharis trimera (Less.) DC. collected in the states of Paraná and Santa Catarina, Brazil, showed that carquejyl acetate was the primary volatile component (38% to 73%), while carquejol and ledol were identified in lower concentrations. Data were subjected to hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis, which confirmed that the chemical compositions of all samples were similar. The results presented here highlight the occurrence of the same chemotype of B. trimera in three southern states of Brazil.
    Química Nova 12/2012; 36(8):1096-1100. DOI:10.1590/S0100-40422013000800003 · 0.66 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective To further characterize the acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChE-Is) pattern of Ptychopetalum olacoides ethanol extract (POEE) on the cytosolic globular monomer (G1) and membrane bound globular tetramer (G4) AChE isoforms in brain areas relevant for cognition.Methods The G1 and G4 AChE isoforms were prepared according to the reported methods and the determination of AChE activity used was adapted from colorimetric method.ResultsPOEE mostly inhibited G1 in hippocampus (75%), and G4 in frontal cortex (58%) and striatum (75%) (P < 0.05). Kinetic analysis indicated that POEE-induced AChE inhibition in hippocampus was of a competitive nature for G1 but uncompetitive for G4.Conclusion Considering the high density of cholinergic projection to the cortex and striatum, and the usefulness of conserving cytosolic acetylcholine to replenish synaptic vesicles in a highly active cognition site such as hippocampus, we argue that this could be a desirable profile for a clinically relevant AChE-I.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The essential oil from the bark of Croton cajucara Bentham, popularly known as sacaca or cajucara, was obtained by hydrodistillation, yielding 1.28% of the former bark mass, and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In total, 50 compounds were identified, with oxygenated sesquiterpenes composing the majority of components. The main compounds identified were: cyperene (12.36%), alpha-guaiene, (11.50%) and epi-beta-Santalene (8.70%).
    Acta Scientiarum Technology 05/2012; 34(3). DOI:10.4025/actascitechnol.v34i3.11712 · 0.32 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Essential oils (EOs) have been reported to possess pharmacological properties, of which those related to the central nervous system have been especially attributed to mono- and sesquiterpenes. Baccharis uncinella DC. (Asteraceae) is used by the Laklaño Indians (Santa Catarina, Brazil) for sedative purposes. Interestingly, the species does not seem to be used medicinally elsewhere in Brazil. This study was designed to compare the composition and sedative properties of B. uncinella EOs obtained closer (BU-SC) and farther (BU-PR) to the Laklaño Indian Reserve. BU-SC and BU-PR obtained by hydrodistillation were analyzed by CG-MS. Mice treated with BU-SC and BU-PR (50 and 100 mg/kg) were evaluated regarding pentobarbital-induced sleeping time, body temperature, and locomotion. Results: BU-SC presents a higher monoterpene/sesquitherpene ratio (0.31); α-pinene (6.42%), limonene (7.21%), caryophyllene (26.13%), spathulenol (13.39%) and caryophyllene oxide (13.26%) were identified as major components. BU-PR presents a low monoterpene/sesquitepene ratio (0.004); spathulenol (32.93%), caryophyllene oxide (27.78%), viridiflorol (5.29%) and α-cadinol (2.42%) were identified as the main components. Both samples significantly (p < 0.05, ANOVA) decreased locomotion and body temperature, as well as increased sleeping time. The hypnotic activity was sensitive to the differences in monoterpene composition. In comparison with a sample collected in Paraná State, B. uncinella EO collected closer to the Laklaño Indians possess a composition that better justifies the claimed sedative properties. The study confirms the value of traditional information to guide bioactivity assessment in medicinal plants, and gives notice to the ecological factors that can interfere with the conclusions of such assessments.
    Pharmaceutical Biology 01/2012; 50(1):113-9. DOI:10.3109/13880209.2011.634423 · 1.34 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to evaluate the gastroprotective mechanism of action of the essential oil of Croton cajucara Benth. (Euphorbiaceae) stem bark in ethanol-induced gastric ulcers and its in vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori activity. The involvement of heat-shock protein-70, vasoactive intestinal peptide, glutathione, nitric oxide, and nonprotein sulfhydryl compounds in the gastroprotective effect was determined in male Wistar rats. The minimum inhibitory concentration against H. pylori was determined in vitro. The results were analyzed by analysis of variance followed by the Dunnett test, and a P value less than 0.05 was considered to represent a statistically significant difference. C. cajucara decreased ethanol-induced ulcer area in 100% of ulcers and decreased the histologic lesions. In the C. cajucara group, the area marked by heat-shock protein-70 was significantly higher than the area in the control group; this finding was not seen for vasoactive intestinal peptide. C. cajucara could not maintain glutathione levels close to those in the sham group. The gastric ulcer area of rats treated with the sulfhydryl compound blocker was decreased, but the ulcer area of rats treated with nitric oxide synthase inhibitor showed no alteration. The minimum inhibitory concentration obtained for C. cajucara was 125 μg/mL. These findings suggest that sulfhydryl compounds and heat-shock protein-70, but not nitric oxide, glutathione, or vasoactive intestinal peptide, are involved in the C. cajucara gastroprotective effect against ethanol-induced gastric ulcers.
    Journal of medicinal food 04/2011; 14(9):1011-7. DOI:10.1089/jmf.2010.0173 · 1.70 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is expected to affect more than 22 million people worldwide by 2025, causing devastating suffering and enormous costs to families and society. AD is a multifactorial disease, with a complex pathological mosaic. In rodents, AD-like dementia can be induced by cerebral microinjection of Aβ peptide, leading to amyloid deposits, amnesia and various features of neurodegeneration. Marapuama (Ptychopetalum olacoides) is regarded as a "brain tonic" in the Amazon region and shows a nootropic profile in rodents. Because a specific extract (POEE) of Marapuama was shown to possess promnesic and anti-amnesic properties, the aim of this study was to verify if POEE is also effective against Aβ(1-42)-induced cognitive deficit in mice. Additionally, Aβ deposits (Congo red), GFAP immunoreactivity (immunohistochemistry), and neurodegenerative changes in the hippocampal pyramidal layer (Nissl) were examined as measures of Aβ(1-42)-induced neurodegeneration. CF1 mice were subjected to the experimental Alzheimer model with the Aβ(1-42) i.c.v. administration. The effects of POEE 800 mg/kg were evaluated over 14 consecutive days of treatment. The data show that 14 days of oral treatment with POEE (800 mg/kg) was effective in preventing Aβ-induced cognitive impairment, without altering the levels of BDNF and with parallel reductions in Aβ deposits and astrogliosis. CA1 hippocampus loss induced by Aβ(1-42) was also diminished in POEE-treated mice. This study offers evidence of functional and neuroprotective effects of two weeks treatment with a Ptychopetalum olacoides extract against Aβ peptide-induced neurotoxicity in mice. Given the multifactorial nature of neurodegeneration, the considerable potential for an AChE inhibitor displaying associated neuroprotective properties such as here reported warrants further clinic evaluation.
    Phytomedicine: international journal of phytotherapy and phytopharmacology 02/2011; 18(4):327-33. DOI:10.1016/j.phymed.2010.07.013 · 2.88 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The goal of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) used to treat Alzheimer's patients is an improvement in cholinergic transmission. While currently available AChEIs have limited success, a huge impediment to the development of newer ones is access to the relevant brain areas. Promnesic, anti-amnesic and AChEI properties were identified in a standardized ethanol extract from Ptychopetalum olacoides (POEE), a medicinal plant favored by the elderly in Amazon communities. The purpose of this study was to provide conclusive evidence that orally given POEE induces AChE inhibition in brain areas relevant to cognition. Histochemistry experiments confirmed that the anticholinesterase compound(s) present in POEE are orally bioavailable, inducing meaningful AChE inhibition in the hippocampus CA1 (∼33%) and CA3 (∼20%), and striatum (∼17%). Ellman's colorimetric analysis revealed that G1 and G4 AChE isoforms activities were markedly inhibited (66 and 72%, respectively) in hippocampus and frontal cortex (50 and 63%, respectively), while G4 appeared to be selectively inhibited (72%) in the striatum. Western blotting showed that POEE did not induce significant changes in the AChE immunocontent suggesting that its synthesis is not extensively modified. This study provides definitive proof of meaningful anticholinesterase activity compatible with the observed promnesic and anti-amnesic effects of POEE in mice, reaffirming the potential of this extract for treating neurodegenerative conditions where a hypofunctioning cholinergic neurotransmission is prominent. Adequate assessment of the safety and efficacy of this extract and/or its isolated active compound(s) are warranted.
    Phytomedicine: international journal of phytotherapy and phytopharmacology 10/2010; 17(12):956-62. DOI:10.1016/j.phymed.2010.03.009 · 2.88 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: With the recognition that high levels of sustained stress are associated with the natural course of countless illnesses, effective anti-stress agents have gained importance. Improved endurance to particularly stressful periods is one of the medicinal claims for Marapuama (Ptychopetalum olacoides Bentham, PO), a popular Amazonian herbal. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if PO possesses anti-stress properties. To this end, an extract from PO (POEE) was evaluated on anxiety and glucose levels in mice submitted to the unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) paradigm. POEE did not present anxiolytic effects, but was able to prevent (p<0.01) the UCMS-induced anxiety as assessed by the light/dark test (time spent in the lit area, POEE 100 and 300mg/kg 235.9+/-20.6s and 250.4+/-17.4s, respectively, compared to DMSO 104.7+/-24.4s). Likewise, although POEE did not induce noticeable effects on glycemia, it effectively (p<0.01) prevented the UCMS-induced hyperglycemia (POEE 100 and 300mg/kg 106.4+/-6.7mg/dl and 107.3+/-3.3mg/dl, respectively, compared to DMSO 134.6+/-5.9mg/dl). Additionally, POEE (50-200mg/kg i.p. and 800mg/kg p.o.) significantly (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively) increased the time to hypoxia-induced convulsion (by 38%, 51%, 59% and 27%, respectively for i.p. and p.o. treatments). The data indicate that POEE counteracts some of the effects brought about by chronic stress. This study combined with the identified antioxidant and neuroprotective properties, as well as the claimed benefits associated with stressful periods suggest that Ptychopetalum olacoides (Marapuama) might possess adaptogen-like properties.
    Phytomedicine: international journal of phytotherapy and phytopharmacology 09/2009; 17(3-4):248-53. DOI:10.1016/j.phymed.2009.07.001 · 2.88 Impact Factor
  • 04/2009; 15(1):73-77. DOI:10.5212/Publ.Exatas.v.15i1.073077
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Depression has become of universal major importance, and it is therefore vital to expand the armamentarium for treating the condition. Lack of motivation and lassitude are major symptoms treated with the use of Marapuama (Ptychopetalum olacoides, PO) remedies by communities in the Brazilian Amazon. Considering the prominence of such symptoms in depression, the present study was designed to verify the effects of a standardized PO ethanol extract (POEE) on the forced swimming (FST) and tail suspension tests (TST). POEE i.p. (15-100 mg/kg) and oral (300 mg/kg) resulted in a significant and dose-related anti-immobility effect. We further examined the involvement of dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin in these antidepressant-like effects. POEE effects were prevented when catecholamine synthesis was inhibited by -alpha-methyl-rho-tyrosine (AMPT) (100 mg/kg, i.p.), while inhibition of serotonin synthesis with rho-chlorophenylalanine methyl ester hydrochloride (PCPA) (100 mg/kg, i.p.) was devoid of effect. The blockade of beta-adrenergic (propranolol 2 mg/kg, i.p.) and D(1) dopamine (SCH 23390 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) receptors prevented POEE anti-immobility effects; by contrast, blockade of D(2) dopamine (sulpiride 2 and 50 mg/kg, i.p.) receptors was ineffective. Consistent with traditional use, the results indicate that POEE possesses antidepressant-like effects, possibly mediated by beta-adrenergic and D(1) dopamine receptors.
    Phytotherapy Research 04/2009; 23(4):519-24. DOI:10.1002/ptr.2664 · 2.40 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Linalool is a monoterpene often found as a major component of essential oils obtained from aromatic plant species, many of which are used in traditional medical systems as hypno-sedatives. Psychopharmacological evaluations of linalool (i.p. and i.c.v.) revealed marked sedative and anticonvulsant central effects in various mouse models. Considering this profile and alleged effects of inhaled lavender essential oil, the purpose of this study was to examine the sedative effects of inhaled linalool in mice. Mice were placed in an inhalation chamber during 60 min, in an atmosphere saturated with 1% or 3% linalool. Immediately after inhalation, animals were evaluated regarding locomotion, barbiturate-induced sleeping time, body temperature and motor coordination (rota-rod test). The 1% and 3% linalool increased (p<0.01) pentobarbital sleeping time and reduced (p<0.01) body temperature. The 3% linalool decreased (p<0.01) locomotion. Motor coordination was not affected. Hence, linalool inhaled for 1h seems to induce sedation without significant impairment in motor abilities, a side effect shared by most psycholeptic drugs.
    Phytomedicine: international journal of phytotherapy and phytopharmacology 10/2008; 16(4):303-7. DOI:10.1016/j.phymed.2008.08.001 · 2.88 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Alcohol infusions of roots from Ptychopetalum olacoides Bentham (PO; Olacaceae) have been used for treating many diseases in which free radicals are likely to be implicated. Of particular interest are the uses amongst the elderly (to ameliorate cognitive functions), and by patients recovering from pathologies associated with damage to the central nervous system (such as stroke). The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant properties of a PO ethanol extract (POEE) by using various in vitro systems. POEE acted as a scavenger of nitrogen oxides as well as superoxide generated by the xanthine-xanthine oxidase system. The extract also showed a high antioxidant capacity using a luminol chemiluminescence derived from a thermolabile diazocompound. We suggest that the therapeutic effects attributed to P. olacoides could be in part associated to its oxygen free radical scavenging capacity.
    Pharmaceutical Biology 09/2008; 40(5):374-379. DOI:10.1076/phbi.40.5.374.8462 · 1.34 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Traditional remedies prepared from Ptychopetalum olacoides (PO) are used throughout the Amazon to alleviate age-related conditions. These formulas are mainly used by elders, and alleged effects may be related to the anticholinesterase properties identified in a standardized ethanol extract of this species [P. olacoides standardized ethanol extract (POEE)]. To further characterize the potential of this extract for developing drugs useful to treat cognitive deficits, the effects of POEE on scopolamine (scop)- and MK801-induced amnesias (acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval) in mice were investigated. Scop (3.0 mg/kg, ip) significantly impaired memory (all three phases) in the step-down inhibitory avoidance protocol. As expected, MK801 (0.1 mg/kg, ip) was amnesic regarding acquisition and consolidation, but not retrieval. POEE (100 mg/kg, ip) reversed the scop-induced impairment in all three phases of long-term and short memories, whereas only the memory consolidation deficit was reversed with MK801-induced amnesia. This study complements previously reported promnesic properties of this plant extract and suggests that POEE may be further developed for treating conditions associated with cognitive deficits, especially those linked with cholinergic malfunction.
    Psychopharmacology 09/2008; 202(1-3):165-72. DOI:10.1007/s00213-008-1272-y · 3.99 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

730 Citations
94.12 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1999–2012
    • State University of Ponta Grossa
      • Department of Chemistry
      Ponta Grossa, Paraná, Brazil
  • 1998–2001
    • University of Milan
      Milano, Lombardy, Italy
    • University of Campinas
      Conceição de Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil
  • 1995–2000
    • Federal University of Pará
      • • Department of Genetics
      • • Department of Physiology
      Pará, Pará, Brazil