Dheepakkumaran Jayaraman

Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Illinois, United States

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Publications (9)2.67 Total impact

  • D. Jayaraman, S. Tragoudas
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper we present a novel algorithm to identify infeasible paths in the behavioral code. The proposed approach initially partitions the behavioral code into segments. At each code segment it stores feasible paths implicitly. It also stores collections of input assignments which are derived using selected statements in the code segment. The method requires state-of-the-art data structures to store feasible paths and the required functions. Experimental results demonstrate the scalability of the proposed method.
    Quality Electronic Design (ISQED), 2013 14th International Symposium on; 01/2013
  • D. Jayaraman, S. Tragoudas
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents a novel approach to determine the sensitization probability of a non-robustly testable path using probability density functions (PDFs). The proposed approach systematically refines a set of patterns that sensitize the path non-robustly which initial set has been derived with existing methods, and is kept implicitly. Accurate measure of the sensitization probability is obtained fast by avoiding Monte-Carlo. It is shown experimentally that the proposed approach is accurate and much faster than Monte-Carlo, and thus can be used to rank a collection of non-robust paths considering their sensitization characteristics.
    Quality Electronic Design (ISQED), 2013 14th International Symposium on; 01/2013
  • Dheepakkumaran Jayaraman, Spyros Tragoudas
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper, we propose an algorithm to compute the occurrence probability for a given path pre- cisely in an acyclic synthesizable VHDL or software code. This can be useful for the ranking of critical paths and in a variety of problems that include compiler-level architec- tural optimization and static timing analysis for improved performance. Functions that represent condition state- ments at the basic blocks are manipulated using Binary De- cision Diagrams (BDDs). Experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms the traditional Monte Carlo simulation approach. The later is shown to be non- scalable as the number of inputs increases.
    Proceedings of the 12th International Symposium on Quality Electronic Design, ISQED 2011, Santa Clara, California, USA, 14-16 March 2011; 01/2011
  • Dheepakkumaran Jayaraman, Rajamani Sethuram, Spyros Tragoudas
    J. Low Power Electronics. 01/2010; 6:311-319.
  • Dheepakkumaran Jayaraman, Rajamani Sethuram, Spyros Tragoudas
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    ABSTRACT: It is a common practice to gate a limited number of scan cells in order to reduce overall switching activity during shift, thereby, reducing the circuit's dynamic power consumption. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to reduce overall shift power during test by inserting extra hardware at the output of scan cells and internal gates. Based on the estimated dynamic power (using PrimeTime-PX), the proposed approach uses a linear time algorithm to identify the nodes to be gated. To avoid degrading the timing of the circuit, additional logic is added only at paths that are not timing-critical. The proposed approach significantly outperforms all approaches that gate only scan cells. Experimental results on ISCAS and ITC benchmarks show that on average more than 48% of the dynamic power can be reduced while reducing the hardware overhead by up to 3.75X.
    Proceedings of the 20th ACM Great Lakes Symposium on VLSI 2009, Providence, Rhode Island, USA, May 16-18 2010; 01/2010
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    ABSTRACT: Previously, segregating populations of RILs and NILs identified and fine mapped loci underlying seed protein content, seed oil content, seed isoflavone content, resistance to Japanese beetles, resistance to cyst nematode and resistance to sudden death syndrome. Candidate genes were identified by BAC end sequence driven scaffold analysis (at SoyGD http://soybeangenome.siu.edu/cgi-bin/gbrowse/SSR_scaffolds) following fine mapping. To determine the effectiveness of association mapping SNPs within candidate genes and linked markers were tested for association in a panel of 112 Plant Introductions. Considering SCN resistance candidate at rhg1 there were 9 alleles of the candidate gene and three were associated with partial resistance. By association one was always present in the resistant state when lines were resistant SCN Hg Type 7 (race 3), a bigeneic resistance. Intrageneic recombinants were always susceptible. Recombination events that disrupted three genes at the core of the locus were absent. Considering resistance to SDS the association was weaker but significant, either because the trait is more multigeneic or because the genes used were linked to not directing the trait underlying genes. By QTL mapping Rhg4 was found to be in the same interval as genes underlying resistance to Japanese beetles. Association mapping could not confirm this association. Considering, protein and oil QTL two markers in linked Acc2 and KasI genes were both significantly associated with traits, KasI more strongly with low oil and high protein and Acc2 the reverse. Five rare alleles for high oil were found in the PI collection but only 2 in cultivated germplasm and one of those was rare. Recombination events in this region may be used to manipulate seed compositions. In conclusion, association mapping in a relatively small set of PIs may be a useful independent test for the identification of multigeneic traits but is not alone robust enough to identify candidate genes without supporting fine maps and genome sequence.
    Plant & Animal Genome PAG XVII; 01/2009
  • Dheepakkumaran Jayaraman, Edward Flanigan, Spyros Tragoudas
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents a novel approach for identifying non-robustly unsensitizable paths using the bounded delay model for gate delays. A unique feature is that the unsensitizable paths are identified by working on a data structure that stores selected circuit paths instead of the netlist. It is shown that unless the delay of untestable paths are ignored, many non-robust paths will remain undetected. Experimental results show the approach implicitly identifies a large number of non-robustly unsensitizable paths, which were not identified with other existing techniques.
    2008 IEEE International Test Conference, ITC 2008, Santa Clara, California, USA, October 26-31, 2008; 01/2008
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    Dheepakkumaran Jayaraman, Edward Flanigan, Spyros Tragoudas
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents a novel approach for identifying non-robustly unsensitizable paths using the bounded gate delay model. It is shown that many non-robust paths will remain undetected unless the delay values are calculated at the path level rather than considering calculations at the circuit level bounded delay. As an initial step a canonical data structure is generated where each circuit path is identifiable and the method operates implicitly on this structure. Experimental results show this implicit approach identifies efficiently a large number of non-robustly unsensitizable paths that were not identified in previous work.
    01/2007;
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    ABSTRACT: Genome analysis of soybean (Glycine max L.) has been complicated by its paleo-autopolyploid nature and conserved homeologous regions. Landmarks of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) located within a minimum tile path (MTP) of contiguous (contig) bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones or radiation hybrid set can identify stress and defense related gene rich regions in the genome. A physical map of about 2,800 contigs and MTPs of 8,064 BAC clones encompass the soybean genome. That genome is being sequenced by whole genome shotgun methods so that reliable estimates of gene family size and gene locations will provide a useful tool for finishing. The aims here were to develop methods to anchor plant defense- and stress-related gene paralogues on the MTP derived from the soybean physical map, to identify gene rich regions and to correlate those with QTL for disease resistance. The probes included 143 ESTs from a root library selected by subtractive hybridization from a multiply disease resistant soybean cultivar 'Forrest' 14 days after inoculation with Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines (F. virguliforme). Another 166 probes were chosen from a root EST library (Gm-r1021) prepared from a non-inoculated soybean cultivar 'Williams 82' based on their homology to the known defense and stress related genes. Twelve and thirteen pooled EST probes were hybridized to high-density colony arrays of MTP BAC clones from the cv. 'Forrest' genome. The EST pools located 613 paralogues for 201 of the 309 probes used (range 1-13 per functional probe). One hundred BAC clones contained more than one kind of paralogue. Many more BACs (246) contained a single paralogue of one of the 201 probes detectable gene families. ESTs were anchored on soybean linkage groups A1, B1, C2, E, D1a+Q, G, I, M, H, and O. Estimates of gene family sizes were more similar to those made by Southern hybridization than by bioinformatics inferences from EST collections. When compared to Arabidopsis thaliana there were more 2 and 4 member paralogue families reflecting the diploidized-tetraploid nature of the soybean genome. However there were fewer families with 5 or more genes and the same number of single genes. Therefore the method can identify evolutionary patterns such as massively extensive selective gene loss or rapid divergence to regenerate the unique genes in some families.
    Plant Methods 02/2006; 2:20. · 2.67 Impact Factor