David S Goodman

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, MI, United States

Are you David S Goodman?

Claim your profile

Publications (4)2.63 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The development of antifilarial antibody responses is a characteristic feature of infection with filarial parasites. It should be possible to exploit this fact to develop tools to monitor the progress of the global program to eliminate lymphatic filariasis (LF); however, assays based on parasite extracts suffer from a number of limitations, including the paucity of parasite material, the difficulty of assay standardization and problems with assay specificity. In principle, assays based on recombinant filarial antigens should address these limitations and provide useful tools for diagnosis and surveillance of LF. The present multicenter study was designed to compare the performance of antibody assays for filariasis based on recombinant antigens Bm14, WbSXP, and BmR1. Coded serum specimens were distributed to five participating laboratories where assays for each antigen were conducted in parallel. Assays based on Bm14, WbSXP, or BmR1 demonstrated good sensitivity (>90%) for field use and none of the assays demonstrated reactivity with specimens from persons with non-filarial helminth infections. Limitations of the assays are discussed. Well-designed field studies are now needed to assess sampling methodology and the application of antibody testing to the monitoring and surveillance of LF elimination programs.
    Filaria Journal 09/2004; 3(1):9.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Entomological methods may provide important tools for monitoring the progress of lymphatic filariasis elimination programs. In this study, we compared dissection of the vector, Culex quinquefasciatus, with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to assess filarial infection levels in mosquitoes in the context of a lymphatic filariasis elimination program in Leogane, Haiti. METHODS: Mosquitoes were collected using gravid traps located in 4 sentinel communities with Wuchereria bancrofti microfilaria prevalence that ranged from 0.8% to 15.9%. Captured mosquitoes were divided between dissection, to enumerate W. bancrofti larvae (L1, L2, L3) and desiccation for later analysis by PCR. PCR was conducted on DNA extracts from pooled mosquitoes (1-15 pooled females) utilizing a competitive PCR system with primers specific for the Ssp I repeat. PCR products were analyzed with a hybridization ELISA using probes specific for a control sequence and the Ssp I repeat. RESULTS: The prevalence of mosquito infection with W. bancrofti ranged from 0%-3.66% by dissection (L1-L3) and point estimates of infection prevalence, as assayed by PCR, ranged from 0.25% - 9.16%. Following mass treatment, W. bancrofti infection prevalence dropped significantly as determined by PCR and dissection in 2 of the 4 sentinel sites (Leogane and Barrier Jeudi, P = 0.04 and P = 0.005, respectively). Although transmission declined in the other two sites, larval recoveries were low and these changes were not statistically significant. DISCUSSION: Our results suggest that a single round of mass treatment can have an impact on transmission of lymphatic filariasis. The use of entomologic methods as a tool to monitor filariasis programs and the statistical limitations of mosquito trapping are discussed.
    Filaria Journal 08/2003; 2(1):11.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: PCR has recently been studied as a promising tool for monitoring the progress of efforts to eliminate lymphatic filariasis. PCR can be used to test concurrently at least 30 pools, with as many as 40 mosquitoes in each pool, for the presence of filarial larvae. The SspI PCR assay for the detection of Wuchereria bancrofti DNA in pools of mosquitoes has been used since 1994 in a variety of laboratories worldwide. During that time, the original assay has been modified in these different laboratories and no standardized assay currently exists. In an effort to standardize and improve the assay, a meeting was held on 15-16 November 2001, at Emory University in Atlanta, with representatives from most of the laboratories currently using the assay. The first round of testing was designed to test the four most promising methods for DNA extraction from pools of mosquitoes. Two of the four methods stood out as clearly the best and these will be now optimised and evaluated in two further rounds of testing.
    Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology 01/2003; 96 Suppl 2:S41-6. · 1.31 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology 01/2002; · 1.31 Impact Factor