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Publications (7)15.91 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE:: The aim of this study was to determine the optimal frequency of combined aerobic and resistance training for improving muscular strength (MS), cardiovascular fitness (CF), and functional tasks (FT) in women over 60 yrs of age. METHODS:: Sixty-three women were randomly assigned to one of 3 exercise training groups. Group 1 performed one resistance training (RET) and one aerobic training (AET) session per week (AET/RET 1 x wk),; Group 2 performed two RET and two AET sessions per week (AET/RET 2 x wk),; and Group 3 performed three RET and three AET sessions per week (AET/RET 3 x wk) MS, CF, and FT measurements were made pre- and 16-wks post-training. RESULTS:: Repeated-measures ANOVA indicated a significant time effect for changes in MS, CF, and FT, such that all improved following training. However, there were no significant training group or training group*time interactions. CONCLUSION:: 16-wks of combined AET/RET (1 x wk, 2 x wk, or 3 x wk) lead to significant improvements in MS, CF, exercise economy, and FT. However, there were no significant differences for MS, CF or FT outcomes between groups.
    The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 09/2012; · 1.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Effects of resistance and aerobic training on the ease of physical activity during and after weight loss are unknown. The purpose of the study was to determine what effect weight loss combined with either aerobic or resistance training has on the ease of locomotion (net V[Combining Dot Above]O2 and heart rate). It is hypothesized that exercise training will result in an increased ease, lowers heart rate during locomotion. Seventy-three overweight premenopausal women were assigned to diet and aerobic training, diet and resistance training, or diet only. Subjects were evaluated while overweight, after diet-induced weight loss (average, 12.5 kg loss), and 1 year after weight loss (5.5 kg regain). Submaximal walking, grade walking, stair climbing, and bike oxygen uptake and heart rate were measured at all time points. Weight loss diet was 800 kcal per day. Exercisers trained 3 times per week during weight loss and 2 times per week during 1-year follow-up. Resistance training increased strength, and aerobic training increased maximum oxygen uptake. Net submaximal oxygen uptake was not affected by weight loss or exercise training. However, heart rate during walking, stair climbing, and bicycling was reduced after weight loss. No significant differences in reduction in heart rate were observed among the 3 treatment groups for locomotion after weight loss. However, during 1-year follow-up, exercise training resulted in maintenance of lower submaximal heart rate, whereas nonexercisers increased heart rate during locomotion. Results suggest that moderately intense exercise is helpful in improving the ease of movement after weight loss. Exercise training may be helpful in increasing the participation in free-living physical activity.
    The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 02/2012; 26(5):1366-73. · 1.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined the relationship between previous dietary adherence during a low-calorie diet weight loss intervention and subsequent weight change during a 2-year follow-up for weight maintenance. One hundred and sixteen healthy, recently weight reduced (lost ~12 kg, BMI 22-25 kg/m2) premenopausal women were studied. Dietary adherence was assessed by doubly labeled water (DLW) and body composition change. Comparisons were made between the upper and lower tertiles for previous dietary adherence and subsequent weight change at 1- and 2-year follow-up. Percent weight regained was significantly lower (30.9 ± 6.7% vs. 66.7 ± 9.4%; P < 0.05) in the upper compared to the lower adherence tertile for previous weight loss dietary adherence (49.9 ± 8.8% vs. 96.8 ± 12.8% P < 0.05) at 1- and 2-year follow-up, respectively. This difference was partly explained by increases in daily activity-related energy expenditure (AEE) (+95 ± 45 kcal/day vs. -44 ± 42 kcal/day, P < 0.05) and lower daily energy intake (2,066 ± 71 kcal/day vs. 2,289 ± 62 kcal/day, P < 0.05) in the higher tertile for previous dietary adherence, compared to the lower. These findings suggest that higher adherence (i.e., higher tertile) to the previous low-calorie diet predicts lower weight regain over 2-year follow-up for weight maintenance, which is explained by lower energy intake and higher physical activity. Finally, how well an individual adheres to a low-calorie diet intervention during weight loss may be a useful tool for identifying individuals who are particularly vulnerable to subsequent weight regain.
    Obesity 12/2010; 19(6):1177-81. · 3.92 Impact Factor
  • Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise - MED SCI SPORT EXERCISE. 01/2010; 42.
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    ABSTRACT: We have recently reported that parous European-American (EA) women have disproportionately more intra-abdominal adipose tissue (IAAT) than their nulliparous counterparts. Mediating mechanisms for IAAT accumulation remain unknown; however, some evidence suggests a possible catecholamine link. The objective of this study was to determine whether the IAAT-parity relationship found in EA women exists in African-American (AA) women and to determine whether catecholamines play a mediating role. Subjects included 44 EA and 47 AA premenopausal women. Free-living physical activity by doubly labeled water (activity-related time equivalent (ARTE)), body composition (air plethysmography, computed tomography), and 24-h fractionated urinary catecholamines were measured. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed parous EA and AA women had significantly higher IAAT than their nulliparous counterparts (100.1 +/- 28.5 and 76.2 +/- 34.8 cm(2) vs. 75.9 +/- 29.1 and 59.6 +/- 15.0 cm(2)). In AA women and nulliparous women, 24-h urinary dopamine was significantly higher (AA parous 260.8 +/- 88; EA parous 197.2 +/- 78.8; AA nulliparous 376.5 +/- 81; EA nulliparous 289.6 +/- 62). Multiple regression analysis for modeling IAAT indicated that race, parity, dopamine, ARTE, and VO(2max) were all significant and independent contributors to the model (Unstandardized betas: race -32.6 +/- 7.4; parity (number of births) 10.0 +/- 3.4; 24-h urinary dopamine 0.08 +/- 0.04; ARTE (min/day) -0.09 +/- 0.04; VO(2max) (ml/kg/min) -2.8 +/- 1.0). Independent of the potential confounders: age, race, percent body fat, IAAT, 24-h fractionated urinary catecholamines, physical activity, and VO(2max), parous EA and AA women had more IAAT than their nulliparous counterparts. Of the catecholamines, dopamine was found to be significantly lower in parous women and higher in AA's. Dopamine, however, did not explain racial or parity differences in IAAT.
    Obesity 05/2008; 16(4):797-803. · 3.92 Impact Factor
  • Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise - MED SCI SPORT EXERCISE. 01/2007; 39.
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    ABSTRACT: Little is known concerning the effects of resistance-exercise training (RT) on older adult's intra-abdominal adipose tissue (IAAT). The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of RT on fat distribution in 12 women and 14 men, aged 61-77 yr. Computed tomography IAAT and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), densitometry-determined body composition, one-repetition maximum (1-RM), and isometric strength were measured before and after 25 wk of RT. Training consisted of two sets of 10 repetitions at 65-80% of 1-RM, three times each week. There were similar increases in strength for both the men and women. Women improved 22% and 38% in the isometric strength test and 1-RM test, respectively, whereas the men improved 21% and 36%, respectively. A significant increase in fat-free mass (FFM) was found for both men and women. However, there was a significant gender x time interaction, which indicated that men increased FFM more than women (2.8 kg vs 1.0 kg, respectively). Similar decreases in fat mass (FM) were found for the men (1.8 kg) and women (1.7 kg). However, women lost a significant amount of IAAT (131 to 116 cm2), whereas the men did not (143 to 152 cm2). Similarly, women also lost a significant amount of SAT (254 to 239 cm2), but men did not (165 to 165 cm2). Despite similar decreases in FM after a 25-wk RT program, older women lost significant amounts of IAAT and SAT, whereas the older men did not.
    Medicine &amp Science in Sports &amp Exercise 07/2002; 34(6):1023-8. · 4.48 Impact Factor