Christina Wenglén

Lund University, Lund, Skane, Sweden

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Publications (8)24.89 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Chondroadherin, a leucine rich repeat extracellular matrix protein with functions in cell to matrix interactions, binds cells via their α2β1 integrin as well as via cell surface proteoglycans, providing for different sets of signals to the cell. Additionally, the protein acts as an anchor to the matrix by binding tightly to collagens type I and II as well as type VI. We generated mice with inactivated chondroadherin gene to provide integrated studies of the role of the protein. The null mice presented distinct phenotypes with affected cartilage as well as bone. At 3-6 weeks of age the epiphyseal growth plate was widened most pronounced in the proliferative zone. The proteome of the femoral head articular cartilage at 4 months of age showed some distinct differences, with increased deposition of cartilage intermediate layer protein 1 and fibronectin in the chondroadherin deficient mice, more pronounced in the female. Other proteins show decreased levels in the deficient mice, particularly pronounced for matrilin-1, thrombospondin-1 and notably the members of the α1-antitrypsin family of proteinase inhibitors as well as for a member of the bone morphogenetic protein growth factor family. Thus, cartilage homeostasis is distinctly altered. The bone phenotype was expressed in several ways. The number of bone sialoprotein mRNA expressing cells in the proximal tibial metaphysic was decreased and the osteoid surface was increased possibly indicating a change in mineral metabolism. Micro-CT revealed lower cortical thickness and increased structure model index, i.e. the amount of plates and rods composing the bone trabeculas. The structural changes were paralleled by loss of function, where the null mice showed lower femoral neck failure load and tibial strength during mechanical testing at 4 months of age. The skeletal phenotype points at a role for chondroadherin in both bone and cartilage homeostasis, however, without leading to altered longitudinal growth.
    PLoS ONE 07/2013; 8(6):e63080. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chondroadherin is a leucine-rich repeat protein known to mediate adhesion of isolated cells via the integrin α2β1 and to interact with collagen. In this work, we show that cell adhesion to chondroadherin leads to activation of MAPKs but does not result in cell spreading and division. This is in contrast to the spreading and dividing of cells grown on collagen, although the binding is mediated via the same α2β1 receptor. We identified a cell binding motif, CQLRGLRRWLEAK318 by mass spectrometry after protease digestion of chondroadherin. Cells adhering to the synthetic peptide CQLRGLRRWLEAK318 remained round, as was observed when they bound to the intact protein. The peptide added in solution was able to inhibit cell adhesion to the intact protein in a dose-dependent manner and was also verified to bind to the α2β1 integrin. A cyclic peptide, CQLRGLRRWLEAKASRPDATC326, mimicking the structural constraints of this sequence in the intact protein, showed similar efficiency in inhibiting binding to chondroadherin. The unique peptide motif responsible for cellular binding is primarily located in the octamer sequence LRRWLEAK318. Binding of cells to the active peptide or to chondroadherin immobilized on cell culture plates rapidly induces intracellular signaling (i.e. ERK phosphorylation). Thus, chondroadherin interaction with cells may be central for maintaining the adult chondrocyte phenotype and cartilage homeostasis. The peptides, particularly the more stable cyclic peptide, open new opportunities to modulate cell behavior in situations of tissue pathology.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 02/2011; 286(5):3925-3934. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chondroadherin is a leucine-rich repeat protein known to mediate adhesion of isolated cells via the integrin α(2)β(1) and to interact with collagen. In this work, we show that cell adhesion to chondroadherin leads to activation of MAPKs but does not result in cell spreading and division. This is in contrast to the spreading and dividing of cells grown on collagen, although the binding is mediated via the same α(2)β(1) receptor. We identified a cell binding motif, CQLRGLRRWLEAK(318) by mass spectrometry after protease digestion of chondroadherin. Cells adhering to the synthetic peptide CQLRGLRRWLEAK(318) remained round, as was observed when they bound to the intact protein. The peptide added in solution was able to inhibit cell adhesion to the intact protein in a dose-dependent manner and was also verified to bind to the α(2)β(1) integrin. A cyclic peptide, CQLRGLRRWLEAKASRPDATC(326), mimicking the structural constraints of this sequence in the intact protein, showed similar efficiency in inhibiting binding to chondroadherin. The unique peptide motif responsible for cellular binding is primarily located in the octamer sequence LRRWLEAK(318). Binding of cells to the active peptide or to chondroadherin immobilized on cell culture plates rapidly induces intracellular signaling (i.e. ERK phosphorylation). Thus, chondroadherin interaction with cells may be central for maintaining the adult chondrocyte phenotype and cartilage homeostasis. The peptides, particularly the more stable cyclic peptide, open new opportunities to modulate cell behavior in situations of tissue pathology.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 02/2011; 286(5):3925-34. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chondroadherin is a cartilage matrix protein that is known to mediate the adhesion of isolated chondrocytes. Its protein core is composed of 11 leucine-rich repeats flanked by cysteine-rich domains at the N- and C-terminal ends. Recombinant human chondroadherin was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to the monoclinic space group P2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 56.4, b = 111.3, c = 128.5 A, beta = 92.2, and are most likely to contain four molecules in the asymmetric unit. The crystals diffracted to at least 2.3 A using synchrotron radiation, but structure determination using molecular replacement has so far been unsuccessful.
    Acta Crystallographica Section F Structural Biology and Crystallization Communications 07/2008; 64(Pt 6):516-9. · 0.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In osteoarthritis (OA), cartilage and bone fragments have been described within the synovial tissue which are surrounded by synovial cells (i.e. detritus synovitis). These cells appear to attach actively to the cartilage and bone fragments. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), on the other hand, synovial fibroblasts (SF) have also been shown to be localized at sites of invasion into cartilage and bone and to degrade extracellular matrix (ECM) by secreting proteolytic enzymes. One prerequisite for exerting their aggressive properties is the attachment to cartilage and bone ECM. This attachment appears to be mediated by the expression of different adhesion molecules for which corresponding binding sites on ECM components are known. As it has not been addressed to which ECM proteins SF adhere and with which affinity this process takes place, we investigated the adherence of SF from patients with OA and RA to different cartilage and bone matrix proteins. Synovial tissue samples were obtained during synovectomy or arthroplastic surgery and used for isolating and culturing SF. Synovial cells attaching to cartilage/bone fragments were characterized using immunohistochemistry. The adherence of SF to ECM proteins was examined using an adhesion assay with the following proteins coated on 96-well plates: aggrecan (AGG), bone sialoprotein (BSP), cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), collagen type I, II and VI, proline arginine-rich, end leucine-rich repeat protein (PRELP), osteopontin (OPN) and recombinant chondroadherin (CHAD). Bovine serum albumin was used as negative control. In addition, adhering fibroblasts were photographed using a phase-contrast microscope. As compared with RA-SF, significantly higher numbers of OA-SF adhering to collagen type II, OPN and CHAD could be detected (P < 0.05). In contrast, RA-SF showed increased attachment to collagen type II, OPN and BSP. Adhesion to AGG, COMP and PRELP appeared not to be significantly increased and differed widely among the SF samples, and, apart from one exception (BSP), OA-SF adhered in higher numbers to the matrix proteins than did RA-SF. Using immunohistochemistry, synovial cells attached to cartilage/bone fragments could be shown to predominantly express CD68 (>/=50%). The CD68-negative population was of the fibroblast phenotype (AS02 positive). The study demonstrates that the binding pattern of OA-SF and RA-SF to ECM proteins differs considerably and therefore provides novel insights into the difficult pathophysiology of OA and RA. In general, it appeared that SF adhere primarily to ECM proteins that contain known binding sites for adhesion molecules (e.g. integrins: collagen/integrin alpha(2)beta(1)) and that higher numbers of OA-SF adhered to the cartilage and bone matrix proteins than did RA-SF.
    Scandinavian Journal of Immunology 11/2004; 60(5):514-23. · 2.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The ability of the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins biglycan, decorin, and chondroadherin to interact with collagen VI and influence its assembly to supramolecular structures was studied by electron microscopy and surface plasmon resonance measurements in the BIAcore 2000 system. Biglycan showed a unique ability to organize collagen VI into extensive hexagonal-like networks over a time period of only a few minutes. Only the intact molecule, substituted with two dermatan sulfate chains, had this capacity. Intact decorin, with one dermatan sulfate chain only, was considerably less efficient, and aggregates of organized collagen VI were found only after several hours. Chondroadherin without glycosaminoglycan substitutions did not induce any ordered collagen VI organization. However, all three related LRR proteins were shown to interact with collagen VI using electron microscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Biglycan and decorin were exclusively found close to the N-terminal parts of the collagen VI tetramers, whereas chondroadherin was shown to bind close to both the N- and C-terminal parts of collagen VI. In the formed hexagonal networks, biglycan was localized to the intra-network junctions of the collagen VI filaments. This was demonstrated by electron microscopy after negative staining of gold-labeled biglycan in aggregation experiments with collagen VI.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 01/2003; 277(51):49120-6. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chondroadherin is a cell binding, leucine-rich repeat protein found in the territorial matrix of articular cartilage. Several members of the leucine-rich repeat protein family present in the extracellular matrix of e.g. cartilage have been shown to interact with collagen and influence collagen fibrillogenesis. We show that complexes of monomeric collagen type II and chondroadherin can be released under non-denaturing conditions from articular cartilage treated with p-aminophenylmercuric acetate to activate resident matrix metalloproteinases. Purified complexes as well as complexes formed in vitro between recombinant chondroadherin and collagen type II were studied by electron microscopy. Chondroadherin was shown to bind to two sites on collagen type II. The interaction was characterized by surface plasmon resonance analysis showing K(D) values in the nanomolar range. Both chondroadherin and collagen interact with chondrocytes, partly via the same receptor, but give rise to different cellular responses. By also interacting with each other, a complex system is created which may be of functional importance for the communication between the cells and its surrounding matrix and/or in the regulation of collagen fibril assembly.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 09/2001; 276(35):32883-8. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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