C M Hansen

University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Capital Region, Denmark

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Publications (4)11.44 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We assessed the hypothesis that the epinephrine surge present during sepsis accelerates aerobic glycolysis and lactate production by increasing activity of skeletal muscle Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase. Healthy volunteers received an intravenous bolus of endotoxin or placebo in a randomized order on two different days. Endotoxemia induced a response resembling sepsis. Endotoxemia increased plasma epinephrine to a maximum at t = 2 h of 0.7 +/- 0.1 vs. 0.3 +/- 0.1 nmol/l (P < 0.05, n = 6-7). Endotoxemia reduced plasma K(+) reaching a nadir at t = 5 h of 3.3 +/- 0.1 vs. 3.8 +/- 0.1 mmol/l (P < 0.01, n = 6-7), followed by an increase to placebo level at t = 7-8 h. During the declining plasma K(+), a relative accumulation of K(+) was seen reaching a maximum at t = 6 h of 8.7 +/- 3.8 mmol/leg (P < 0.05). Plasma lactate increased to a maximum at t = 1 h of 2.5 +/- 0.5 vs. 0.9 +/- 0.1 mmol/l (P < 0.05, n = 8) in association with increased release of lactate from the legs. These changes were not associated with hypoperfusion or hypoxia. During the first 24 h after endotoxin infusion, renal K(+) excretion was 27 +/- 7 mmol, i.e., 58% higher than after placebo. Combination of the well-known stimulatory effect of catecholamines on skeletal muscle Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity, with the present confirmation of an expected Na(+)-K(+)- ATPase-induced decline in plasma K(+), suggests that the increased lactate release was due to increased Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity, supporting our hypothesis. Thus increased lactate levels in acutely and severely ill patients should not be managed only from the point of view that it reflects hypoxia.
    AJP Heart and Circulatory Physiology 03/2003; 284(3):H1028-34. · 3.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Seventeen volunteers received an intravenous bolus of endotoxin (2 ng/kg of body weight). Endotoxin-induced lymphopenia was constituted mainly by cells with an immature phenotype (CD45RA(+) CD45RO(-)) that were less likely to undergo apoptosis (CD28(+)), whereas cells with the highest rates of disappearance were characterized by an activated phenotype (CD45RA(-) CD45RO(+)) as well as a phenotype linked to apoptosis (CD95(+) CD28(-)). In conclusion, endotoxin-induced lymphopenia reflects the disappearance from the circulation of activated lymphocytes prone to undergo apoptosis.
    Clinical and Diagnostic Laboratory Immunology 06/2002; 9(3):731-5. · 2.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: and objective The aim of this study was to determine possible age-associated differences in human blood pressure regulation during an immunological challenge in healthy subjects. Eight healthy young volunteers (median age 24 yr) and nine healthy elderly volunteers (median age 66 yr) received an intravenous bolus injection of Escherichia coli endotoxin (2 ng kg(-1)). Blood pressure, heart rate and core temperature were monitored during the first 7 h. Plasma catecholamine concentrations were measured at hourly intervals. The elderly showed a significantly more pronounced decrease in mean arterial pressure 4-7 h after endotoxin administration compared with the young controls (ANOVA; age x time; P < 0.0005). This mainly reflected a decrease in the systolic blood pressure in the elderly. The heart rate of both groups increased without difference between groups. Increased plasma epinephrine concentrations were found 2-3 h after endotoxin administration in both groups. Five hours after the endotoxin challenge, the epinephrine concentration had returned to control values in the elderly group only, in spite of decreased blood pressure. In conclusion, healthy elderly subjects fail to maintain a constant mean arterial pressure in response to the immunological challenge of endotoxemia.
    European Journal of Anaesthesiology 09/2001; 18(9):572-5. · 2.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether an age-associated impaired acute-phase response exists. Nine healthy elderly volunteers (median, 66 years; range, 61 to 69 years) and eight young controls (median, 24 years; range, 20 to 27 years) were given an intravenous bolus of endotoxin (2 ng/kg). The rectal temperature was monitored continuously, and blood samples for cytokine measurements were obtained before endotoxin administration as well as 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h after the injection. The elderly subjects showed a more prolonged fever response compared to the young controls. Levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), soluble TNF receptors (sTNFR-I), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, IL-10, and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) in plasma increased markedly following endotoxin administration in both groups. The elderly group showed larger initial increases in TNF-alpha and sTNFR-I levels and prolonged increased levels of sTNFR-I. Monocyte concentrations decreased in both groups, with the elderly group showing a more rapid decrease and a slower subsequent increase than did the young group. Furthermore, the elderly group had a more rapid increase in C-reactive protein levels than did the young group. In conclusion, ageing is associated with an altered acute-phase response including initial hyperreactivity, prolonged inflammatory activity, and prolonged fever response.
    Clinical and Diagnostic Laboratory Immunology 04/2001; 8(2):333-8. · 2.51 Impact Factor