Chourmouzios A Arampatzis

Interbalkan European Medical Center, Saloníki, Central Macedonia, Greece

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Publications (44)373.56 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Aims: We sought to explore whether global and regional scientific output in cardiovascular medicine are associated with economic variables and follow the same trend as medicine and as science overall. Methods and results: We registered the number of documents, number of citations, citations per document and the h-index for the first 50 countries according to the h-index (a measure to evaluate both the productivity and impact of the publications) in cardiovascular medicine. Economic variables (gross domestic product [GDP] per capita, % expenditure of the GDP in research and development [R&D] and health) were obtained from the World Bank, the UNESCO, and the World Health Organization. In total, the scientific output in cardiology showed the same position as in medicine and science overall (mean difference vs. medicine -0.9±5.3º, p=0.25 vs. science -0.7±5.3º, p=0.39). We found significant correlations between the h-index and the % GDP expenditure in R&D (r=0.67, p<0.001), and the % GDP expenditure in health (r=0.71, p<0.0001). Overall, there was a 21.4% (interquartile range 3.7; 55.0) increase in the % GDP expenditure in R&D between 1996 and 2007. Emerging economies showed the larger growth in % GDP expenditure in health and R&D. Conclusions: The global situation of scientific output in cardiovascular medicine is highly polarised and closely related to economic indicators. Emergent economies, with higher rates of GDP growth and increasingly larger expenditures for R&D and healthcare, are expected to show a visible escalation in the scientific global picture in the near future.
    EuroIntervention: journal of EuroPCR in collaboration with the Working Group on Interventional Cardiology of the European Society of Cardiology 08/2013; 9(8). DOI:10.4244/EIJV9I8A163 · 3.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: No randomized studies have thus far evaluated intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guidance in the drug-eluting stent (DES) era. The aim was to evaluate if IVUS optimized DES implantation was superior to angiographic guidance alone in complex lesions. Randomized, multicentre, international, open label, investigator-driven study evaluating IVUS vs angiographically guided DES implantation in patients with complex lesions (defined as bifurcations, long lesions, chronic total occlusions or small vessels). Primary study endpoint was post-procedure in lesion minimal lumen diameter. Secondary end points were combined major adverse cardiac events (MACE), target lesion revascularization, target vessel revascularization, myocardial infarction (MI), and stent thrombosis at 1, 6, 9, 12, and 24 months. The study included 284 patients. No significant differences were observed in baseline characteristics. The primary study end point showed a statistically significant difference in favor of the IVUS group (2.70 mm ± 0.46 mm vs. 2.51 ± 0.46 mm; P = .0002). During hospitalization, no patient died, had repeated revascularization, or a Q-wave MI. No difference was observed in the occurrence of non-Q wave MI (6.3% in IVUS vs. 7.0% in angio-guided group). At 24-months clinical follow-up, no differences were still observed in cumulative MACE (16.9%vs. 23.2 %), cardiac death (0%vs. 1.4%), MI (7.0%vs. 8.5%), target lesion revascularization (9.2% vs. 11.9%) or target vessel revascularization (9.8% vs. 15.5%), respectively in the IVUS vs. angio-guided groups. In total, only one definite subacute stent thrombosis occurred in the IVUS group. A benefit of IVUS optimized DES implantation was observed in complex lesions in the post-procedure minimal lumen diameter. No statistically significant difference was found in MACE up to 24 months.
    American heart journal 01/2013; 165(1):65-72. DOI:10.1016/j.ahj.2012.09.017 · 4.56 Impact Factor
  • Atherosclerosis Supplements 04/2005; 6(1):108-108. DOI:10.1016/S1567-5688(05)80427-1 · 9.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) have recently been shown to reduce restenosis in selected patients. The impact of this new stent on the use of coronary bypass graft (CABG) surgery or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in clinical practice is yet unknown. Therefore, we investigated the impact of SES on the clinical practice of CABG and PCI in a series of unselected consecutive patients. Between April and October 2002, a policy of SES implantation for all procedures has been instituted in our hospital. In total, 798 patients were referred to PCI and 275 to CABG (SES group). A control group was composed of all interventions (806 PCI and 314 CABG) performed during the preceding 6 months (pre-SES). The main outcome was the occurrence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) at 15 months. In the SES era, a significant shift was noted in the PCI group towards more multi-vessel stenting (28 vs. 24%; P<0.05), more bifurcation stenting (18 vs. 7%; P<0.0001), and the use of more stents (1.9 vs. 1.5; P<0.05). In the PCI elective patients, a shift was noted towards more three-vessel disease (pre-SES: 16% vs. SES: 23%; P=0.02). Furthermore, we observed a shift in the CABG group towards more impaired LV function (pre-SES: 34% vs. SES: 41%; P=0.02) and towards more three-vessel disease (pre-SES: 67% vs. SES: 75%; P=0.03). Overall, the cumulative MACE percentages at 1 year after coronary revascularization (PCI and CABG combined) decreased from 16.8 to 13.8% (P=0.03). The cumulative MACE percentages in the pure SES group and the pre-SES bare metal stent group at 12 months were 15.6 and 19.8%, respectively (P<0.01). The introduction of the SES has certainly had an impact on the treatment strategy of coronary artery disease (CAD). Increased use of these stents allows more complex coronary anatomy to be treated by PCI, and results in lower repeat revascularization rates.
    European Heart Journal 04/2005; 26(7):675-81. DOI:10.1093/eurheartj/ehi088 · 14.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mild renal impairment is an important risk factor for late cardiovascular complications. This substudy of the Lescol Intervention Prevention Study (LIPS) assessed the effect of fluvastatin on outcome of patients who had renal dysfunction and those who did not. Complete data for creatinine clearance calculation (Cockcroft-Gault formula) were available for 1,558 patients (92.9% of the LIPS population). Patients were randomized to fluvastatin or placebo after successful completion of a first percutaneous coronary intervention. Follow-up time was 3 to 4 years. The effect of baseline creatinine clearance on coronary atherosclerotic events (cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and coronary reinterventions not related to restenosis) was evaluated. Baseline creatinine clearance (logarithmic transformation) was inversely associated with an incidence of adverse events among patients who received placebo (hazard ratio 0.99, 95% confidence interval 0.982 to 0.998, p = 0.01). However, no association was noted between creatinine clearance and the incidence of adverse events among patients who received fluvastatin (hazard ratio 1.0, 95% confidence interval 0.99 to 1.0, p = 0.63). No further deterioration in creatinine clearance was observed during follow-up, regardless of baseline renal function or allocated treatment. Occurrence of adverse events was not related to changes in renal function during follow-up. Fluvastatin therapy markedly decreased the risk of coronary atherosclerotic events after percutaneous intervention in patients who had lower values of creatinine clearance at baseline. The benefit of fluvastatin was unrelated to any effect on renal function.
    The American Journal of Cardiology 03/2005; 95(4):445-51. DOI:10.1016/j.amjcard.2004.10.008 · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the impact of the extent of coronary disease (single- or multivessel) and of fluvastatin treatment on the incidence of long-term cardiac atherosclerotic complications in the Lescol Intervention Prevention Study (LIPS). A total of 1063 patients with single-vessel disease and 614 patients with multivessel disease were randomized to receive fluvastatin (40 mg bid) or placebo for at least 3 years following a first successful percutaneous coronary intervention. The incidence of cardiac atherosclerotic events (cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, and coronary re-interventions not related to restenosis) was evaluated. Patients with multivessel disease tended to be older and presented a higher prevalence of associated risk factors and cardiovascular antecedents. The presence of multivessel disease markedly increased the risk of cardiac atherosclerotic events compared with single-vessel disease among patients allocated to placebo (RR 1.67 [95% CI: 1.24-2.25]; p<0.001). In patients treated with fluvastatin, however, no significant differences in long-term outcomes were observed between patients with multivessel disease and patients single-vessel disease (RR 1.28 [95% CI: 0.90-1.81]; p=0.2). Multivessel coronary disease impaired the 4-year outcomes after percutaneous intervention. However, the hazardous effect of multivessel disease was significantly reduced by long-term fluvastatin treatment.
    International Journal of Cardiology 03/2005; 98(3):479-86. DOI:10.1016/j.ijcard.2003.11.031 · 6.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Diabetes increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Patients with diabetes undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) show poorer outcomes compared with nondiabetic patients. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical benefit of long-term fluvastatin in patients with diabetes who had undergone a successful PCI. This subanalysis of a prospective, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of patients who had undergone PCI and were treated with fluvastatin determined the impact of fluvastatin on the survival-free period of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) (defined as cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and reintervention procedure [coronary artery bypass grafting, repeat PCI, PCI for a new lesion]). Patients with baseline total cholesterol levels of 135 to 270 mg/dL (3.5-7.0 mmol/L) and triglyceride levels of 400 mg/dL (4.5 mmol/L) were randomized at discharge either to fluvastatin (n = 844) or to placebo (n = 833); follow-up was 3 to 4 years. Among these patients, there were 202 with diabetes (120 on fluvastatin, 82 placebo) and 1475 without diabetes (724 on fluvastatin, 751 on placebo). The primary clinical outcome was survival time free of MACE and MACE excluding restenosis. The presence of diabetes increased the risk of MACE by almost 2-fold in placebo-treated patients (RR 1.78, 95% CI 1.20-2,64, P = .0045). In contrast, in diabetic patients treated with fluvastatin, the risk of MACE was not significantly different from that in patients without diabetes. Fluvastatin reduced the risk of MACE in diabetic patients by 51% (P = .0088). Diabetes is a consistent clinical predictor of cardiovascular complications and fluvastatin reduces the increased incidence of long-term adverse complications associated with the presence of diabetes.
    American heart journal 03/2005; 149(2):329-35. DOI:10.1016/j.ahj.2004.03.067 · 4.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We sought to compare the diagnostic value of multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) coronary angiography (CA) to detect significant stenoses (> or =50% lumen diameter reduction) with that of invasive CA. The latest 16-row MSCT scanner has a faster rotation time (375 ms) and permits scanning with a higher X-ray tube current (500 to 600 mA) during MSCT CA when compared with previous scanners. We studied 51 patients (37 men, mean age 58.9 +/- 10.0 years) with stable angina or atypical chest pain. Patients with pre-scan heart rates > or =70 beats/min received oral beta-blockade. The heart was scanned after intravenous injection of 100 ml contrast (iodine content, 400 mg/ml). Mean scan time was 18.9 +/- 1.0 s. The MSCT scans were analyzed by two observers unaware of the results of invasive angiography, and all available coronary branches > or =2 mm were included. Invasive CA demonstrated normal arteries in 16% (8 of 51), non-significant disease in 21% (11 of 51), single-vessel disease in 37% (19 of 51), and multi-vessel disease in 26% (13 of 51) of patients. There were 64 significant lesions. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for detection of significant lesions on a segment-based analysis were 95% (61 of 64, 95% confidence interval [CI] 86 to 99), 98% (537 of 546, 95% CI 96 to 99), 87% (61 of 70, 95% CI 76 to 98), and 99% (537 of 540, 95% CI 98 to 99), respectively. All patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries or significant lesions were correctly identified. Three of 11 patients with <50% lesions were incorrectly classified as having single-vessel disease. The 16-row MSCT CA reliably detects significant coronary stenoses in patients with atypical chest pain or stable angina pectoris.
    Journal of the American College of Cardiology 02/2005; 45(1):128-32. DOI:10.1016/j.jacc.2004.09.074 · 15.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: From April 16, 2002 to October 16, 2002, 10 consecutive patients with coronary disease on chronic dialysis were treated with sirolimus-eluting stents. Diabetes was present in 30% and half of the patients had multivessel coronary disease. On average, patients had been on dialysis for 5 years prior to the procedure (range: 2-15 years). Five patients were on hemodialysis and 5 patients were on peritoneal dialysis. Overall, 18 lesions were treated with 1.9 +/- 1.1 sirolimus-eluting stents per patient. At a mean follow-up of 403 days, there were no cases of death, myocardial infarction, or target lesion revascularization.
    The Journal of invasive cardiology 01/2005; 16(12):685-7. · 0.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Renal impairment is an important predictor of mortality after percutaneous coronary intervention and may increase the restenosis rate. However, the relation between restenosis and the risk of death in patients who have renal impairment remains unclear. We evaluated the incidences of repeat revascularization and mortality in patients who had renal impairment and those who did not and who received sirolimus-eluting stents or bare stents. A total of 1,080 consecutive patients treated for 1 year had available data to calculate baseline creatinine clearance. Patients received bare stents (first 6 months, n = 543) or sirolimus-eluting stents (last 6 months, n = 537) and were grouped according to the presence or absence of renal impairment (creatinine clearance <60 ml/min). Patients who had renal impairment had a higher mortality rate at 1 year (7.6% vs 2.5%, hazard ratio 3.14, 95% confidence interval 1.68 to 5.88, p <0.01), with no differences in mortality between patients who received bare stents and those who received sirolimus-eluting stents (hazard ratio 0.91, 95% confidence interval 0.49 to 1.68, p = 0.8). The incidence of target vessel revascularization decreased significantly in patients who were treated with sirolimus-eluting stents and did not have renal impairment (hazard ratio 0.59, 95% confidence interval 0.39 to 0.90, p = 0.01) and in those who had decreased renal function (hazard ratio 0.37, 95% confidence interval 0.15 to 0.90, p = 0.03). Thus, sirolimus-eluting stents compared with conventional stents decreased clinical restenosis in patients who had renal impairment. However, this benefit was not paralleled by a decrease in the risk of death in this population. It seems unlikely that restenosis could be a contributing factor that influenced the increased mortality of patients who had impaired renal function.
    The American Journal of Cardiology 01/2005; 95(2):167-72. DOI:10.1016/j.amjcard.2004.08.089 · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The long-term effect of stents in patients with multivessel disease involving the proximal left anterior descending artery was investigated. At 3 years, there was no difference in the combined incidence of death, stroke, and myocardial infarction in either group, but the need for repeat revascularization was more frequent in the group with stenting than in the group with coronary artery bypass grafting.
    The American Journal of Cardiology 10/2004; 94(5):627-31. DOI:10.1016/j.amjcard.2004.05.028 · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the effectiveness of routine sirolimus eluting stent (SES) implantation for unselected patients with in-stent restenosis and to provide preliminary information about the angiographic outcome for lesion subgroups and for different in-stent restenosis patterns. Prospective, single centre registry. Tertiary referral centre. 44 consecutive patients (53 lesions) without previous brachytherapy who were treated with SES for in-stent restenosis were evaluated. Routine angiographic follow up was obtained at six months and the incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events was evaluated. At baseline, 42% of the lesions were focal, 21% diffuse, 26% proliferative, and 11% total occlusions. Small vessel size (reference diameter < or = 2.5 mm) was present in 49%, long lesions (> 20 mm) in 30%, treatment of bypass grafts in 13%, and bifurcation stenting in 18%. At follow up, post-SES restenosis was observed in 14.6%. No restenosis was observed in focal lesions. For more complex lesions, restenosis rates ranged from 20-25%. At the one year follow up, the incidence of death was 0, myocardial infarction 4.7% (n = 2), and target lesion revascularisation 16.3% (n = 7). The target lesion was revascularised because of restenosis in 11.6% (n = 5). Routine SES implantation is highly effective for focal in-stent restenosis and appears to be a promising strategy for more complex patterns of restenosis.
    Heart (British Cardiac Society) 10/2004; 90(10):1183-8. DOI:10.1136/hrt.2003.025536 · 6.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of sirolimus-eluting stent (SES) implantation for patients with multivessel disease, which included left anterior descending artery (LAD) treatment. Since April 2002, SES has been utilized as the device of choice for all interventions in our institution as part of the Rapamycin-Eluting Stent Evaluated at Rotterdam Hospital (RESEARCH) registry. In the first 6 months of enrollment, 99 consecutive patients (17.6% of the total population) were treated for multivessel disease involving the LAD. The impact of SES implantation on major adverse cardiac events (MACE) was evaluated. All the patients received SES in the LAD. Additional stent implantation in the right coronary artery, the left circumflex, or in all three major vessels was attempted successfully in 32 (32%), 51 (52%), and 16 (16%) of the treated patients respectively. During a mean follow-up of 360 +/- 59 days (range, 297-472 days), we had one death, one non-Q-wave myocardial infarction, and eight patients required subsequent intervention. The event-free survival of MACE at 1 year was 85.6%. SES implantation for multivessel disease in a consecutive series of patients is associated with low incidence of adverse events. The reported results are related predominantly to the reduction in repeat revascularization.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 09/2004; 63(1):57-60. DOI:10.1002/ccd.20073 · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The percutaneous treatment of coronary bifurcation stenoses is hampered by an increased rate of subsequent restenosis. The present study reports on the outcomes of a consecutive series of 58 patients with 65 de novo bifurcation stenoses treated with sirolimus-eluting stent implantation in both the main vessel and side branch. At 6 months, the incidence of major adverse cardiac events was 10.3% (1 death and 5 target lesion revascularizations) with no episodes of acute myocardial infarction or stent thrombosis.
    The American Journal of Cardiology 08/2004; 94(1):115-8. DOI:10.1016/j.amjcard.2004.03.040 · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The effectiveness of sirolimus-eluting stent (SES) implantation in patients treated electively for left main (LM) stenoses has not been yet ascertained. The present study reports on the clinical and angiographic outcome of 16 consecutive patients treated electively for de novo stenoses in the LM. The impact of SES implantation on major adverse cardiac events was evaluated. Mean age was 65 +/- 11 years. Unprotected LM was present in nine (56%), and eight patients (50%) received stents extending into both the left anterior descending and circumflex arteries for stenoses of the distal left main bifurcation. In-house mortality and reintervention rate was zero. One patient developed a non-Q-wave myocardial infarction related to the index procedure. At 1-year clinical follow-up, there were no deaths or further myocardial infarctions; one (6%) patient required target lesion revascularization. A total of 12 patients (75%) underwent 6-month angiographic follow-up with a late lumen loss of 0.04 +/- 0.65 mm and one focal restenosis (8% of patients). Elective SES implantation for LM disease was associated with zero mortality and a very low incidence of additional major adverse events at 1 year.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 07/2004; 62(3):292-6; discussion 297. DOI:10.1002/ccd.20064 · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The long-term efficacy of percutaneous coronary intervention for mildly obstructive coronary narrowings is limited by the occurrence of restenosis, limiting the applicability of this therapy for these lesions. The present study reports on a consecutive series of 20 patients treated with sirolimus-eluting stent implantation for 23 angiographically mild de novo lesions (defined as a diameter stenosis <50% by quantitative coronary angiography). At a mean follow-up of 399 +/- 120 days, the survival-free of major adverse events was 95%, with no patient requiring target lesion revascularization.
    The American Journal of Cardiology 07/2004; 94(1):112-4. DOI:10.1016/j.amjcard.2004.03.039 · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We evaluated the clinical and angiographic outcomes of patients presenting with restenosis after sirolimus-eluting stent (SES) implantation treated with repeated percutaneous intervention. A total of 24 consecutive patients have undergone repeated percutaneous intervention to treat post-SES restenosis (27 lesions). The restenosis was located within the stent in 93% of lesions. From the 27 lesions, 1 (4%) was re-treated with a bare stent, 3 (11%) were treated with balloon dilatation, and the remaining 23 lesions (85%) were treated with repeated drug-eluting stent implantation (SES in 12 lesions [44%], paclitaxel-eluting stents in 11 lesions [41%]). The event-free survival rate was 70.8% after a median follow-up of 279 days from the post-SES treatment. The overall recurrent restenosis rate was 42.9%. The risk of recurrent restenosis was increased for patients with hypercholesterolemia, previous angioplasty, failed brachytherapy, post-SES restenosis needing early (<6 months) treatment, and post-SES restenosis treated with balloon dilatation. The recurrent restenosis rate of originally de novo lesions re-treated with drug-eluting stents was 18.2%. Even though de novo lesions treated with SES at baseline and re-treated with drug-eluting stents had reasonably better outcomes than other lesion types and strategies, our study shows that the treatment of post-SES restenosis is currently suboptimal and warrants further investigation.
    Circulation 07/2004; 109(21):2500-2. DOI:10.1161/01.CIR.0000130173.63105.4E · 14.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to compare the mid-term clinical outcome of sirolimus-eluting stent (SES) implantation and vascular brachytherapy (VBT) for in-stent restenosis (ISR). We assessed the 9-month occurrence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) in 44 consecutive patients with ISR treated with SES implantation and 43 consecutive patients treated with VBT in the period immediately prior. Baseline clinical and angiographic characteristics of the two groups were similar. During follow-up, three patients (7%) died in the VBT group and none in the SES group. The incidence of myocardial infarction was 2.3% in both groups. Target lesion revascularization was performed in 11.6% of the VBT patients and 16.3% of the SES patients (P = NS). The 9-month MACE-free survival was similar in both groups (79.1% VBT vs. 81.5% SES; P = 0.8 by log rank). The result of this nonrandomized study suggests that sirolimus-eluting stent implantation is at least as effective as vascular brachytherapy in the treatment of in-stent restenosis.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 07/2004; 62(3):283-8. DOI:10.1002/ccd.20068 · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with a history of previous coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is associated with an increased rate of subsequent adverse events compared to those without prior CABG. We evaluated the impact of utilizing the sirolimus-eluting stent (SES) in this high-risk population. Since April 2002, SES implantation was utilized as the default strategy for all percutaneous procedures in our hospital. Consecutive patients with a history of previous CABG and de novo lesions (n=47) treated exclusively with SES, were compared to 66 patients who received bare stents in the 6-month period just before SES introduction. There were no significant differences between the groups (SES and bare stent) with respect to baseline clinical or lesion characteristics. The only difference between the groups related to the nominal diameter of stent utilized, which was smaller in the SES group than the bare stent group. (The maximum diameter of SES available was 3.0 mm). At 1 year, the cumulative incidence of major adverse events (defined as death, myocardial infarction, or target vessel revascularization) was significantly lower in the SES group than the bare stent group [8.5 versus 30.3%, hazard ratio 0.37 (95% confidence interval 0.15-0.91); P=0.03]. The utilization of the sirolimus-eluting stent for percutaneous intervention in a high-risk population with a history of previous CABG surgery is associated with a significant reduction in the rate of major adverse cardiac events at 1 year.
    Coronary Artery Disease 06/2004; 15(3):171-5. DOI:10.1097/00019501-200405000-00006 · 1.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sirolimus-eluting stents have been used in our institution for all percutaneous interventions, without clinical or anatomic exclusion criteria, as part of the Rapamycin-Eluting Stent Evaluated At Rotterdam Cardiology Hospital registry. We analyzed the incidence of (sub)acute stent thrombosis after sirolimus-eluting stent implantation in an unselected population of 510 consecutive patients. At 3-month follow-up, (sub)acute stent thrombosis was diagnosed in 2 patients (0.4%) 6 hours and 11 days after the procedure, respectively. These cases occurred in diabetic women with complex coronary lesions. Intravascular ultrasound examination showed inadequate stent expansion and uncovered distal dissection as possible mechanical explanations for the thrombosis.
    The American Journal of Cardiology 06/2004; 93(10):1271-5. DOI:10.1016/j.amjcard.2004.02.013 · 3.43 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
373.56 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013
    • Interbalkan European Medical Center
      Saloníki, Central Macedonia, Greece
  • 2003–2005
    • Erasmus MC
      • Department of Cardiology
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2003–2004
    • Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam
      • Department of Cardiology
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands