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Publications (2)2.65 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of early orthodontic treatment with the Twin-block appliance for the treatment of Class II Division 1 malocclusion. This was a multi-center, randomized, controlled trial with subjects from 14 orthodontic clinics in the United Kingdom. The study included 174 children aged 8 to 10 years with Class II Division 1 malocclusion; they were randomly allocated to receive treatment with a Twin-block appliance or to an initially untreated control group. The subjects were then followed until all orthodontic treatment was completed. Final skeletal pattern, number of attendances, duration of orthodontic treatment, extraction rate, cost of treatment, and the child's self-concept were considered. At the end of the 10-year study, 141 patients either completed treatment or accepted their occlusion. Data analysis showed that there was no differences between those who received early Twin-block treatment and those who had 1 course of treatment in adolescence with respect to skeletal pattern, extraction rate, and self-esteem. Those who had early treatment had more attendances, received treatment for longer times, and incurred more costs than the adolescent treatment group. They also had significantly poorer final dental occlusion. Twin-block treatment when a child is 8 to 9 years old has no advantages over treatment started at an average age of 12.4 years. However, the cost of early treatment to the patient in terms of attendances and length of appliance wear is increased.
    American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics: official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics 06/2009; 135(5):573-9. · 1.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aims of this study were to assess whether early Twin-block appliance treatment improves the attractiveness of Class II profiles and to determine the orofacial features of a profile that most influence the perception of attractiveness. Silhouetted profiles of 20 treated patients and 20 untreated controls randomly selected from 174 subjects (ages, 8-10 years) of a randomized, controlled trial into the effectiveness of early Class II treatment were assessed by 30 children (ages, 10-11 years) and 24 teaching staff using a 5-point Likert scale. Independent samples t tests were used to compare attractiveness ratings between the treated and untreated groups. Linear regression was used to determine the features defining attractiveness. Early orthodontic treatment resulted in improved perceptions of facial profile attractiveness. Profiles were likely to be rated as attractive if the overjet was smaller (P = 0.001) and no teeth showed (P <0.05). Profile silhouettes of children who had received early orthodontic treatment for Class II malocclusion were perceived to be more attractive by peers than those of children who did not receive treatment.
    American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics: official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics 05/2009; 135(5):580-5. · 1.33 Impact Factor