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Publications (6)27.15 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Sirt1 has been associated with various effects of calorie restriction, including an increase in lifespan. Here we show in mice that a central regulatory component in energy metabolism, the hypothalamic melanocortin system, is affected by Sirt1, which promotes the activity and connectivity of this system resulting in negative energy balance. In adult mice, the pharmacological inhibition of brain Sirt1 activity decreased Agrp neuronal activity and the inhibitory tone on the anorexigenic POMC neurons, as measured by the number of synaptic inputs to these neurons. When a Sirt1 inhibitor (EX-527) was injected either peripherally (i.p., 10 mg/kg) or directly into the brain (i.c.v., 1.5 nmol/mouse), it decreased both food intake during the dark cycle and ghrelin-induced food intake. This effect on feeding is mediated by upstream melanocortin receptors, because the MC4R antagonist, SHU9119, reversed Sirt1's effect on food intake. This action of Sirt1 required an appropriate shift in the mitochondrial redox state: in the absence of such an adaptation enabled by the mitochondrial protein, UCP2, Sirt1-induced cellular and behavioral responses were impaired. In accordance with the pharmacological results, the selective knock-out of Sirt1 in hypothalamic Agrp neurons through the use of Cre-Lox technology decreased electric responses of Agrp neurons to ghrelin and decreased food intake, leading to decreased lean mass, fat mass, and body weight. The present data indicate that Sirt1 has a central mode of action by acting on the NPY/Agrp neurons to affect body metabolism.
    Journal of Neuroscience 09/2010; 30(35):11815-25. · 6.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It is well known that adenine-based purines exert multiple effects on pain transmission. However, less attention has been given to the potential effects of guanine-based purines on pain transmission. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intraperitoneal (i.p.) and oral (p.o.) administration of guanosine on mice pain models. Additionally, investigation into the mechanisms of action of guanosine, its potential toxicity and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) purine levels were also assessed. Mice received an i.p. or p.o. administration of vehicle (0.1 mM NaOH) or guanosine (up to 240 mg x kg(-1)) and were evaluated in several pain models. Guanosine produced dose-dependent antinociceptive effects in the hot-plate, glutamate, capsaicin, formalin and acetic acid models, but it was ineffective in the tail-flick test. Additionally, guanosine produced a significant inhibition of biting behaviour induced by i.t. injection of glutamate, AMPA, kainate and trans-ACPD, but not against NMDA, substance P or capsaicin. The antinociceptive effects of guanosine were prevented by selective and non-selective adenosine receptor antagonists. Systemic administration of guanosine (120 mg x kg(-1)) induced an approximately sevenfold increase on CSF guanosine levels. Guanosine prevented the increase on spinal cord glutamate uptake induced by intraplantar capsaicin. This study provides new evidence on the mechanism of action of the antinociceptive effects after systemic administration of guanosine. These effects seem to be related to the modulation of adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors and non-NMDA glutamate receptors.
    British Journal of Pharmacology 03/2010; 159(6):1247-63. · 5.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Quinolinic acid (QA) is an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor agonist that also promotes glutamate release and inhibits glutamate uptake by astrocytes. QA is used in experimental models of seizures studying the effects of overstimulation of the glutamatergic system. The guanine-based purines (GBPs), including the nucleoside guanosine, have been shown to modulate the glutamatergic system when administered extracellularly. GBPs were shown to inhibit the binding of glutamate and analogs, to be neuroprotective under excitotoxic conditions, as well as anticonvulsant against seizures induced by glutamatergic agents, including QA-induced seizure. In this work, we studied the electrophysiological effects of guanosine against QA-induced epileptiform activity in rats at the macroscopic cortical level, as inferred by electroencephalogram (EEG) signals recorded at the epidural surface. We found that QA disrupts a prominent basal theta (4-10 Hz) activity during peri-ictal periods and also promotes a relative increase in gamma (20-50 Hz) oscillations. Guanosine, when successfully preventing seizures, counteracted both these spectral changes. MK-801, an NMDA-antagonist used as positive control, was also able counteract the decrease in theta power; however, we observed an increase in the power of gamma oscillations in rats concurrently treated with MK-801 and QA. Given the distinct spectral signatures, these results suggest that guanosine and MK-801 prevent QA-induced seizures by different network mechanisms.
    Experimental Neurology 11/2009; 221(2):296-306. · 4.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It is well known that adenine-based purines exert multiple effects on pain transmission. Recently, we have demonstrated that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administered guanine-based purines are antinociceptive against chemical and thermal pain models in mice. The present study was designed to further investigate the antinociceptive effects of guanosine in mice. Animals received an intrathecal (i.t.) injection of vehicle (0.1 mN NaOH) or guanosine (10 to 400 nmol). Measurements of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) purine levels and spinal cord glutamate uptake were performed. Guanosine produced dose-dependent antinociceptive effects against tail-flick, hot-plate, intraplantar (i.pl.) capsaicin, and i.pl. glutamate tests. Additionally, i.t. guanosine produced significant inhibition of the biting behavior induced by i.t. injection of glutamate (175 nmol/site), AMPA (135 pmol/site), kainate (110 pmol/site), trans-ACPD (50 nmol/site), and substance P (135 ng/site), with mean ID(50) values of 140 (103-190), 136 (100-185), 162 (133-196), 266 (153-461) and 28 (3-292) nmol, respectively. However, guanosine failed to affect the nociception induced by NMDA (450 pmol/site) and capsaicin (30 ng/site). Intrathecal administration of guanosine (200 nmol) induced an approximately 120-fold increase on CSF guanosine levels. Guanosine prevented the increase on spinal cord glutamate uptake induced by i.pl. capsaicin. This study provides new evidence on the mechanism of action of guanosine presenting antinociceptive effects at spinal sites. This effect seems to be at least partially associated with modulation of glutamatergic pathways by guanosine.
    European journal of pharmacology 05/2009; 613(1-3):46-53. · 2.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Allopurinol is a potent inhibitor of the enzyme xanthine oxidase, used primarily in the treatment of hyperuricemia and gout. It is well known that purines exert multiple effects on pain transmission. We hypothesized that the inhibition of xanthine oxidase by allopurinol, thereby reducing purine degradation, could be a valid strategy to enhance purinergic activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-nociceptive profile of allopurinol on chemical and thermal pain models in mice. Mice received an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of vehicle (Tween 10%) or allopurinol (10-400 mg kg(-1)). Anti-nociceptive effects were measured with intraplantar capsaicin, intraplantar glutamate, tail-flick or hot-plate tests. Allopurinol presented dose-dependent anti-nociceptive effects in all models. The opioid antagonist naloxone did not affect these anti-nociceptive effects. The non-selective adenosine-receptor antagonist caffeine and the selective A(1) adenosine-receptor antagonist, DPCPX, but not the selective A(2A) adenosine-receptor antagonist, SCH58261, completely prevented allopurinol-induced anti-nociception. No obvious motor deficits were produced by allopurinol, at doses up to 200 mg kg(-1). Allopurinol also caused an increase in cerebrospinal fluid levels of purines, including the nucleosides adenosine and guanosine, and decreased cerebrospinal fluid concentration of uric acid. Allopurinol-induced anti-nociception may be related to adenosine accumulation. Allopurinol is an old and extensively used compound and seems to be well tolerated with no obvious central nervous system toxic effects at high doses. This drug may be useful to treat pain syndromes in humans.
    British Journal of Pharmacology 02/2009; 156(1):163-72. · 5.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It is well known that adenine-based purines exert multiple effects on pain transmission. However, less attention has been given to the potential effects of guanine-based purines (GBPs) on pain transmission. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) guanosine and GMP on mice pain models. Mice received an i.c.v. injection of vehicle (saline or 10 muM NaOH), guanosine (5 to 400 nmol), or GMP (240 to 960 nmol). Additional groups were also pre-treated with i.c.v. injection of the A(1)/A(2A) antagonist caffeine (15 nmol), the non-selective opioid antagonist naloxone (12.5 nmol), or the 5'-nucleotidase inhibitor AOPCP (1 nmol). Measurements of CSF purine levels and cortical glutamate uptake were performed after treatments. Guanosine and GMP produced dose-dependent antinociceptive effects. Neither caffeine nor naloxone affected guanosine antinociception. Pre-treatment with AOPCP completely prevented GMP antinociception, indicating that conversion of GMP to guanosine is required for its antinociceptive effects. Intracerebroventricular administration of guanosine and GMP induced, respectively, a 180- and 1800-fold increase on CSF guanosine levels. Guanosine was able to prevent the decrease on cortical glutamate uptake induced by intraplantar capsaicin. This study provides new evidence on the mechanism of action of GBPs, with guanosine and GMP presenting antinociceptive effects in mice. This effect seems to be independent of adenosine and opioid receptors; it is, however, at least partially associated with modulation of the glutamatergic system by guanosine.
    Brain Research 09/2008; 1234:50-8. · 2.88 Impact Factor