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Publications (2)17 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: A new generation of diagnostic tests, the interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs), have been developed for the detection of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). Limited data are available on their use in HIV-infected persons. A cross-sectional study was carried out at 2 HIV clinics in Atlanta to assess the utility of two IGRA tests (T-SPOT.TB [TSPOT] and QuantiFERON-TB Gold in Tube [QFT-3G]) compared to the tuberculin skin test (TST). 336 HIV-infected persons were enrolled. Median CD4 count was 335 cells/microl and median HIV viral load was 400 copies/ml. Overall, 27 patients (8.0%) had at least 1 positive diagnostic test for LTBI: 7 (2.1%) had a positive TST; 9 (2.7%) a positive QFT-3G; and 14 (4.2%) a positive TSPOT. Agreement between the 3 diagnostic tests was poor: TST and TSPOT, [kappa = 0.16, 95% CI (-0.06, 0.39)], TST and QFT-3G [kappa = 0.23, 95% CI (-0.05, 0.51)], QFT-3G and TSPOT [kappa = 0.06, 95% CI (-0.1, 0.2)]. An indeterminate test result occurred among 6 (1.8%) of QFT-3G and 47 (14%) of TSPOT tests. In multivariate analysis, patients with a CD4 < or = 200 cells/microl were significantly more likely to have an indeterminate result [OR = 3.6, 95% CI (1.9, 6.8)]. We found a low prevalence of LTBI and poor concordance between all 3 diagnostic tests. Indeterminate test results were more likely at CD4 counts < or = 200 cells/microl. Additional studies among HIV-infected populations with a high prevalence of TB are needed to further assess the utility of IGRAs in this patient population.
    BMC Infectious Diseases 02/2009; 9:15. · 3.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Studies have shown that community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) causes S. aureus skin and soft-tissue infection in selected populations. To determine the proportion of infections caused by community-acquired MRSA, the clinical characteristics associated with community-acquired MRSA, and the molecular epidemiology of community-acquired MRSA among persons with community-onset S. aureus skin and soft-tissue infection. Active, prospective laboratory surveillance to identify S. aureus recovered from skin and soft-tissue sources. 1000-bed urban hospital and its affiliated outpatient clinics in Atlanta, Georgia. 384 persons with microbiologically confirmed community-onset S. aureus skin and soft-tissue infection. Proportion of infections caused by and clinical factors associated with community-acquired MRSA among persons with community-onset S. aureus skin and soft-tissue infection. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were used to epidemiologically classify community-onset S. aureus infections. Community-acquired MRSA was defined by MRSA isolates that either demonstrated a USA 300 or USA 400 pulsed-field type or had a susceptibility pattern showing resistance only to beta-lactams and erythromycin (for isolates not available for pulsed-field gel electrophoresis). Community-onset skin and soft-tissue infection due to S. aureus was identified in 389 episodes, with MRSA accounting for 72% (279 of 389 episodes). Among all S. aureus isolates, 63% (244 of 389 isolates) were community-acquired MRSA. Among MRSA isolates, 87% (244 of 279 isolates) were community-acquired MRSA. When analysis was restricted only to MRSA isolates that were available for pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, 91% (159 of 175 isolates) had a pulsed-field type consistent with community-acquired MRSA; of these, 99% (157 of 159 isolates) were the MRSA USA 300 clone. Factors independently associated with community-acquired MRSA infection were black race (prevalence ratio, 1.53 [95% CI, 1.16 to 2.02]), female sex (prevalence ratio, 1.16 [CI, 1.02 to 1.32]), and hospitalization within the previous 12 months (prevalence ratio, 0.80 [CI, 0.66 to 0.97]). Inadequate initial antibiotic therapy was statistically significantly more common among those with community-acquired MRSA (65%) than among those with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus skin and soft-tissue infection (1%). Some MRSA isolates were not available for molecular typing. The community-acquired MRSA USA 300 clone was the predominant cause of community-onset S. aureus skin and soft-tissue infection. Empirical use of agents active against community-acquired MRSA is warranted for patients presenting with serious skin and soft-tissue infections.
    Annals of internal medicine 04/2006; 144(5):309-17. · 13.98 Impact Factor